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Rich Tea434 posts since 16 Apr 2017
Anglia (West) Look East
Why are the clouds often cut off behind the presenter on BBC Weather reports?


Annoying isn't it. I'm sure when the new graphics started that they weren't doing this and it's something that began happening some while after. It does not make the chart look very pleasing on the eye does it.
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Rich Tea434 posts since 16 Apr 2017
Anglia (West) Look East
I'd wondered about this too. Surely it can't be too hard to stitch images from more than one satellite together. Its not like there isn't satellite imagery from over the Atlantic .


Precisely! Thumbs up

We are often shown a fully detailed satellite image of our entire side of the northern hemisphere with all cloud formations showing.
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bilky asko5,179 posts since 9 Sep 2006
Tyne Tees Look North (North East)
I'd wondered about this too. Surely it can't be too hard to stitch images from more than one satellite together. Its not like there isn't satellite imagery from over the Atlantic.


The old maps also did this, but they blurred the edges so it wasn't as jarring. The area extended further on a wider shot, but I presume this is because the wider data is only available at a lower resolution.
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Hatton Cross2,980 posts since 4 Jan 2003
Central (West) Midlands Today
Glad it's not me then.
Odd thing is, with some presenters the clouds extend all way to the left hand side (IIRC Stav and Carol) but with other they have the blue block of doom behind them.

Personal choice, so they are 'not lost in the clouds' maybe?
My user name might look like Hatton Cross, but it's pronounced Throatwobbler Mangrove.
Rich Tea434 posts since 16 Apr 2017
Anglia (West) Look East
Glad it's not me then.
Odd thing is, with some presenters the clouds extend all way to the left hand side (IIRC Stav and Carol) but with other they have the blue block of doom behind them.

Personal choice , so they are 'not lost in the clouds' maybe?


Interesting point in wondering how much personal choice these forecasters/presenters actually have in how they provide the TV bulletin on screen. Are there any other personal touches that have been noticed by particular people in the forecasts they do for instance?
Steve in Pudsey9,469 posts since 4 Jan 2003
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
I've noticed that the forecast Look North puts on Facebook on a morning varies in usefulness depending on who is on duty.

Often the forecast stops at 5pm (because nobody is interested in whether they need a brolly for the journey home), but I noticed that Lisa Gallagher does let the graphics run on into the evening.
Write that down in your copybook now.
Rkolsen2,326 posts since 20 Jan 2014
BBC World
I'd wondered about this too. Surely it can't be too hard to stitch images from more than one satellite together. Its not like there isn't satellite imagery from over the Atlantic.


The satellite imagery (assuming you don’t mean a camera shot of the sky) if it’s being delivered in data form should easily be manageable and meshed by the weather computer. So I assume no stiching as well.
Last edited by Rkolsen on 24 August 2018 8:13am
Don’t let anyone treat you like you’re a VO/SOT when you’re a PKG.
RichSwitch11 posts since 8 Sep 2017
Meridian (South) South Today
I’ve noticed several times on BBC Afternoon Live, the graphics have not loaded so the weather presenter has had to deliver a forecast stood in front of a screen with a list of whatever is loading up. It was very rarely this happened with the Met Office. I can only think two things: 1. Whatever system the presenters link their forecast graphics to does not have enough memory/processing power to cope; or 2. Meteogroup’s Weather Presenter system itself is crud.
Luckily Simon McCoy usually entertains us. Probably useful for the purposes of Christmas VT out-takes if they still produce those.
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