The Newsroom

Newsnight

CH
chris Granada North West Today
Putting aside whether or not Cummings broke the law, her assertion that the public mood is "one of fury, contempt and anguish", is pure comment, and not fact. And quite honestly who the hell is anyone to state as fact the public mood in a political situation?
I remember listening to an edition of Feedback, where they got I believe Nick Robinson and the "Head of News", whoever they were, to outline how the BBC reports its stories, and one of the main points made were that the BBC "does not, should not, and will not use emotive and strong language" and they gave examples such as calling someone a "liar". I think it's clear here that Emily didn't follow this.


Which parts do you consider to be emotive?

The liar thing is an interesting debate that cropped up last year where an industry exec said lies should be called out more. I think from Channel 4 but I can’t find it currently.
WH
Whataday Founding member Wales Wales Today
chris posted:
Which parts do you consider to be emotive?


Quote:
1. Dominic Cummings broke the rules
2. The country can see that Dominic Cummings broke the rules
3. The country is shocked that the government cannot see that Dominic Cummings broke the rules
4. The longer the government backs Cummings, the more angry the response will be
5. Dominic Cummings always understood the public mood previously .
6. Dominic Cummings tagged the label of ‘elite’ on those that disagreed.
7. The label of ‘elite’ is lazy .
8. The public mood is one of fury, contempt and anguish
9. He made those that kept to the rules feel like fools .
10. Those that kept to the rules struggled to do so.
11. He has allowed many more people to assume they can now flout the rules.
12. The Prime Minister knows this as fact.
13. The Prime Minister has had a dramatic early warning from the polls.
14. There is a deep national disquiet .
15. The Prime Minister has chosen to ignore all the above.
16. The Prime Minister’s motivation for the defence of Dominic Cummings is blind loyalty.
CI
cityprod West Country (West) Spotlight
As I said, this is about much more than whether or not Cummings broke the rules.

This is what the opening monologue stated as fact :

1. Dominic Cummings broke the rules


He did. Durham Police have basically confirmed it. No problems there.

Quote:
2. The country can see that Dominic Cummings broke the rules


Yep. 71% according to YouGov. And that's pretty much a cross party consencus with even Moderate Conservatives feeling that way.

Quote:
3. The country is shocked that the government cannot see that Dominic Cummings broke the rules


Of course the country is shocked. A lot of people would have heard the name for the first time when Boris Johnson became PM. They don't know his history and his reputation. Only those of us who do, were not shocked by all this, and that's a small percentage.

Quote:
4. The longer the government backs Cummings, the more angry the response will be


We're seeing signs of this already. Even though it's way more likely to blow over than to turn into Boris Johnson's Poll Tax moment, there's enough strength of feeling there for it to turn into Boris Johnson's Poll Tax moment, if he doesn't play his cards right, and so far, he hasn't.

Quote:
5. Dominic Cummings always understood the public mood previously.


As much as this one pains me, he has been a better judge of public mood before, and knew how to capitalise on it. "Always" might be a little bit of a push, but if all you know of him, is that he was on the winning side in the Brexit referendum, then yes, up til now.

Quote:
6. Dominic Cummings tagged the label of ‘elite’ on those that disagreed.


He did. That's factual.

Quote:
7. The label of ‘elite’ is lazy.


It is lazy. It's been one of the right wing's favourite ways to demonise criticism, by claiming it is part of "liberal elitism" for many many years now. It's practically a right wing trope.

Quote:
8. The public mood is one of fury, contempt and anguish


There's been contempt for politicians and political advisers pretty much since I was a kid, so that's accurate. And yes, there's been plenty of fury and anguish over all this on social media. Nothing wrong there.

Quote:
9. He made those that kept to the rules feel like fools.


Yep, he did. Agagin, plenty of people saying on social media, that they feel this way, so again nothing wrong there.

Quote:
10. Those that kept to the rules struggled to do so.


Yep. Everything's been a struggle in these past 2 months or so.

Quote:
11. He has allowed many more people to assume they can now flout the rules.


Considering the name of Dominic Cummings keeps cropping up now as a reason why people are flouting lockdown rules, then yes, this is accurate.

Quote:
12. The Prime Minister knows this as fact.


Boris Johnson may be a buffoon, but he's not totally stupid. I have no doubt he does know this. We're already seeing the evidence from police forces about point 11, so it would be highly unlikely he hasn't been told of this.

Quote:
13. The Prime Minister has had a dramatic early warning from the polls.


Yes he has. In the two most recent opinion polls, the Conservative's lead has dropped from 12pts, to 6pts. Even Boris Johnson's approval/disapproval rating is currrently between +6 & -1, depending on polling company. That's a definite warning shot across his political bows.

Quote:
14. There is a deep national disquiet.


Yes. When your own supporters are split on the matter, pretty evenly, and you've got opposition opinion massing against your position, that's pretty deep.

Quote:
15. The Prime Minister has chosen to ignore all the above.


By not insisting on his resignation and publically backing him, then yeah, he is ignoring all the above.

Quote:
16. The Prime Minister’s motivation for the defence of Dominic Cummings is blind loyalty.


As Arthur Conan Doyle in the guise of his literary creation Sherlock Holmes once said, when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however unlikely, must be the truth. The political calculation is that he should go, the history of these things indicates that when an adviser becomes the story, they go, the public mood is he should go, that only leaves blind loyalty, as to why he is staying.

So I ask, what was so agregious about that 1 minute opening? Just that it felt to you like opinion journalism, even though it wasn't? Just that you don't believe the BBC should doing this on a news programme, to which I reply, Newsnight is and always has been a current affairs programme, not a news programme. What was so wrong about it?
WH
Whataday Founding member Wales Wales Today
So I ask, what was so agregious about that 1 minute opening? Just that it felt to you like opinion journalism, even though it wasn't?


It was presented in the style of a newspaper leader, I am immovable from that position. Had she only cited specific opinion polls, that would have been factual (for what the polls are worth). Describing the mood of the entire nation in such emotive terms is opinion. To call the labelling of the 'elite' lazy is opinion.

On this occasion it may be your opinion. It may also be my opinion but that doesn't make it solid fact.
Cando, LondonViewer and AndrewPSSP gave kudos
CI
cityprod West Country (West) Spotlight
So I ask, what was so agregious about that 1 minute opening? Just that it felt to you like opinion journalism, even though it wasn't?


It was presented in the style of a newspaper leader, I am immovable from that position. Had she only cited specific opinion polls, that would have been factual (for what the polls are worth). Describing the mood of the entire nation in such emotive terms is opinion. To call the labelling of the 'elite' lazy is opinion.

On this occasion it may be your opinion. It may also be my opinion but that doesn't make it solid fact.


Erm, where is the redundant emotion there? Where has been emotion been added to the story. Every emotional reference in the story is not added to induce emotion, it's reporting on what emotions are being felt. Emotive language would be language added to a story to make it have more emotional resonnance. That's not what this is. Every emotion referenced in the story is descriptive, not emotive.
SP
Steve in Pudsey Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
Can I remind those who are rushing to condemn Emily Maitlis personally that the opening to Newsnight is scripted?

While she may have had a big input into writing it, the Producer and/or Editor would have approved it and should be doing a lot of the can carrying here.
Write that down in your copybook now.
JW
JamesWorldNews STV Central World News
So, the BBC is to appoint a manager to oversee and ensure employees don’t flout impartiality standards on social media.

I know this is not Coronavirus related per se, but how is such a manager going to be able to “manage” this? The corporation has thousands of employees, most of whom are regularly encouraged to engage with the public on social media. In this day and age, every news anchor will tell us her/his twitter handle at the end of every bulletin or, sometimes, twenty times during the course of a shift.

This signals a fundamental lack of trust (in its staff) by the BBC.

We witness dire opposite extremes here: the entire Government moves to support one advisor and saves him from the sack; whereas at the BBC, one intro to a daily news bulletin enforces a clamp down on every employee with in the organisation!

It’s bizarre.
@JamesWorldNews | #StayHomeSaveLives
MA
Markymark Meridian (Thames Valley) South Today
Can I remind those who are rushing to condemn Emily Maitlis personally that the opening to Newsnight is scripted?

While she may have had a big input into writing it, the Producer and/or Editor would have approved it and should be doing a lot of the can carrying here.


Actually, the buck stops (as far as the programme is concerned) solely with the editor, simple as that. Seems that another thing that has vanished in recent years is proper leadership and accountabilty lines. You see the lack of it everywhere these days.
DE
derek500 West Country (West) Points West
Bbc correction / clarification on the Newsnight / Maitlis statement from the other day. It clarifies that the problem with the monologue was that it claimed to represent public opinion as being shocked Cummings broke rules - and so cld have been perceived as partial. See below pic.twitter.com/5L2iXHMm6j

https://twitter.com/Edsbrown/status/1266281185186996225
DO
dosxuk Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
What are the chances of that clarification getting any where near as much distribution as the original statement?

If they'd said at the start their problem was the reference to polling data then they'd have saved themselves a lot of bad press.
LV
LondonViewer London London
So, the BBC is to appoint a manager to oversee and ensure employees don’t flout impartiality standards on social media.

I know this is not Coronavirus related per se, but how is such a manager going to be able to “manage” this? The corporation has thousands of employees, most of whom are regularly encouraged to engage with the public on social media. In this day and age, every news anchor will tell us her/his twitter handle at the end of every bulletin or, sometimes, twenty times during the course of a shift.

This signals a fundamental lack of trust (in its staff) by the BBC.

We witness dire opposite extremes here: the entire Government moves to support one advisor and saves him from the sack; whereas at the BBC, one intro to a daily news bulletin enforces a clamp down on every employee with in the organisation!

It’s bizarre.

I’d have the whole lot of them off Twitter if it was up to me. I wouldn’t be paying journalists to populate twitter with content.
1. News & politics on twitter are toxic. See reactions to Laura K tweets as an example.
2. Gives journalists a warped view of the world as they tweet in a Twitter bubble.
3. Inevitably damages brand reputation of the organisation at some point.
4. Lack of editorial control over opinions expressed by journalists tweeting under an organisation by line.

What’s the benefits? Makes the journalists a bit more celeb. Drives traffic to a site if they tweet a link back.
It’s all a little bit self indulgent, in my opinion.
DV
DVB Cornwall West Country (West) Spotlight
Totally disagree, Twitter is a clear channel for information to be posted on. Broadcasters and I include senior reporters via their accounts, more than ever need to populate it with material to balance the loonies on it. Removing their content makes the situation more toxic.

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