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itsrobert6,325 posts since 23 Mar 2001
weirdfish posted:
Inspector Sands posted:
weirdfish posted:
Is the BBC in the news game or not? That's what it comes down to. If all you do is wait for official sources then you are in PR not news.


But they're not waiting for official sources (there are very few 'official' sources of news) they're just waiting for verified reliable sources.

Unlike most other stories it took place in a remote location, the only eye-witnesses or people who knew for definite what was going on were: Robin Cook (dead), his wife (distraught), the passer by who called the emergency services (not a reliable source and not really in a position to do anything) and the emergency services themselves (who can't release such information). If all you're hearing is rumour they aren't proper sources

It amazes me that people are still confused about the BBCs response when there is a concise description of how the news broke, from someone who was in the newsroom yesterday afternoon is on page 4 of this thread.


I still can't believe that the BBC couldn't stand this story up for an hour after when Sky and ITVNC could.

Also, when they knew he was dead why didn't they report it?


They did report it - and before Sky and ITV, might I add. The only reason it didn't come out sooner was because it was embargoed until all family was informed. You wouldn't exactly want to switch your TV on and find out that your father had died, would you?
weirdfish15 posts since 27 Oct 2004
itsrobert posted:
weirdfish posted:
Inspector Sands posted:
weirdfish posted:
Is the BBC in the news game or not? That's what it comes down to. If all you do is wait for official sources then you are in PR not news.


But they're not waiting for official sources (there are very few 'official' sources of news) they're just waiting for verified reliable sources.

Unlike most other stories it took place in a remote location, the only eye-witnesses or people who knew for definite what was going on were: Robin Cook (dead), his wife (distraught), the passer by who called the emergency services (not a reliable source and not really in a position to do anything) and the emergency services themselves (who can't release such information). If all you're hearing is rumour they aren't proper sources

It amazes me that people are still confused about the BBCs response when there is a concise description of how the news broke, from someone who was in the newsroom yesterday afternoon is on page 4 of this thread.


I still can't believe that the BBC couldn't stand this story up for an hour after when Sky and ITVNC could.

Also, when they knew he was dead why didn't they report it?


They did report it - and before Sky and ITV, might I add. The only reason it didn't come out sooner was because it was embargoed until all family was informed. You wouldn't exactly want to switch your TV on and find out that your father had died, would you?


Why agree to an embargo? News is news. Do you think the news media would agree to an embargo is someone more important died - like the PM, U.S. President or something? Why agree over an ex-Foreign Secretary, ex-Leader of the House? Immediate family wouldn't have been shocked or likely to be watching as they were either en route to the hospital or at the hospital.
weirdfish15 posts since 27 Oct 2004
Hymagumba posted:
oh my god, would it affect your day THAT MUCH to know someone died a few hours before. It's politeness, plain and simple.


You may well be right Hymaguma: it is politeness. It's just not news.
ctb38 posts since 7 Jul 2005
weirdfish posted:

You may well be right Hymaguma: it is politeness. It's just not news.


With that line of thought, you would fit in well working for a tabloid newspaper.
itsrobert6,325 posts since 23 Mar 2001
weirdfish posted:
itsrobert posted:
weirdfish posted:
Inspector Sands posted:
weirdfish posted:
Is the BBC in the news game or not? That's what it comes down to. If all you do is wait for official sources then you are in PR not news.


But they're not waiting for official sources (there are very few 'official' sources of news) they're just waiting for verified reliable sources.

Unlike most other stories it took place in a remote location, the only eye-witnesses or people who knew for definite what was going on were: Robin Cook (dead), his wife (distraught), the passer by who called the emergency services (not a reliable source and not really in a position to do anything) and the emergency services themselves (who can't release such information). If all you're hearing is rumour they aren't proper sources

It amazes me that people are still confused about the BBCs response when there is a concise description of how the news broke, from someone who was in the newsroom yesterday afternoon is on page 4 of this thread.


I still can't believe that the BBC couldn't stand this story up for an hour after when Sky and ITVNC could.

Also, when they knew he was dead why didn't they report it?


They did report it - and before Sky and ITV, might I add. The only reason it didn't come out sooner was because it was embargoed until all family was informed. You wouldn't exactly want to switch your TV on and find out that your father had died, would you?


Why agree to an embargo? News is news. Do you think the news media would agree to an embargo is someone more important died - like the PM, U.S. President or something? Why agree over an ex-Foreign Secretary, ex-Leader of the House? Immediate family wouldn't have been shocked or likely to be watching as they were either en route to the hospital or at the hospital.


I'm sorry, but that is a very insensitive comment. Say you were the Prime Minister's son and was holidaying in the south of France. Your father is killed in a road crash and an eyewitness calls up the BBC to tell them that the PM has been killed. The BBC put it on the air straight away, and you just happen to be watching BBC World. How would you like to be informed that your father has been killed via a television set?
Charlie Wells3,784 posts since 26 Nov 2003 Moderator
keeping-watch posted:
There was no embargo on the Cook news


And you can bet if anyone found out for sure Blair was dead - they'd go straight to air with it immediately

I suspect they would wait until the relatives had been informed first. Often or not 'credible sources' will not confirm such news until this has happenned.
Gavin Scott8,284 posts since 23 Mar 2001
itsrobert posted:
'm sorry, but that is a very insensitive comment. Say you were the Prime Minister's son and was holidaying in the south of France. Your father is killed in a road crash and an eyewitness calls up the BBC to tell them that the PM has been killed. The BBC put it on the air straight away, and you just happen to be watching BBC World. How would you like to be informed that your father has been killed via a television set?


Come on Rob, get a grip. If you are the PM or another figure in public life then you can bet the news would make it to air in next to no time.
itsrobert6,325 posts since 23 Mar 2001
Gavin Scott posted:
itsrobert posted:
'm sorry, but that is a very insensitive comment. Say you were the Prime Minister's son and was holidaying in the south of France. Your father is killed in a road crash and an eyewitness calls up the BBC to tell them that the PM has been killed. The BBC put it on the air straight away, and you just happen to be watching BBC World. How would you like to be informed that your father has been killed via a television set?


Come on Rob, get a grip. If you are the PM or another figure in public life then you can bet the news would make it to air in next to no time.


Don't be so sure, Gavin. No matter who you are in the world, you deserve decency and respect. To find out that a family member or close friend has died via television must be a very harrowing experience. Even the most public figure in the land and his family deserve respect.
Marcus1,289 posts since 2 Jul 2001
Gavin Scott posted:
itsrobert posted:
'm sorry, but that is a very insensitive comment. Say you were the Prime Minister's son and was holidaying in the south of France. Your father is killed in a road crash and an eyewitness calls up the BBC to tell them that the PM has been killed. The BBC put it on the air straight away, and you just happen to be watching BBC World. How would you like to be informed that your father has been killed via a television set?


Come on Rob, get a grip. If you are the PM or another figure in public life then you can bet the news would make it to air in next to no time.


Rob is right. There may be many rumors but any conformation of death would not come until the close relatives had been informed. The exception would be if the news leaked out, say from a hospital spokesman, as was the case with Diana. When John Smith died the news not confirmed until his daughter, backpacking in Asia, had been located and told.