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Pete9,053 posts since 18 Jun 2001
Well the Palestinian Women Show can be taped on any random date and watched again.

Would be interesting if it was given to someone else - it would be a very C4 *ooh aren't we alternative* thing to do.

Were the BBC allowed to offer as they were with five?
noggin14,704 posts since 26 Jun 2001
Hymagumba posted:
Well the Palestinian Women Show can be taped on any random date and watched again.

Would be interesting if it was given to someone else - it would be a very C4 *ooh aren't we alternative* thing to do.

Were the BBC allowed to offer as they were with five?


Didn't think the BBC were allowed to bid for the Five contract - did they?
cat2,590 posts since 4 Jan 2003
AFAIK, it used to (and may still) be that the BBC were only drafted in to provide news for another channel when another suitable news provider could not be found. Presumably if there were no bids, or a dispute meant that a news provider wasn't in place by the time the contract expired. As such, the channel was left unable to provide its public service remit of x-amount of daily news.

I remember reading at the time of the ITN/Sky ITV News bid, that if they couldn't agree on a deal by the time the ITN contract expired that the BBC would be legally obliged to provide news on ITV to ensure that ITV could fulfil their licence agreements with the Government.
Londoner7,265 posts since 4 Jan 2003
More on More4 News:
Broadcast posted:
8am: More4 News bulletins will "democratise the news," by airing reports taken from international broadcasters.

Martin Fewell, the deputy editor of C4 News who has been overseeing the development of the 30-minute weeknight bulletin, said if More4 had been up and running in July, Brazilian news clips would have been shown following the tube shooting of Jean Charles de Menezes.

"I don't think we had an opportunity to see how the story was reported from a Brazilian perspective," said Fewell who is in charge of the More4 News until Will Thorne, currently deputy editor of the BBC's Six O'Clock News, joins as editor next month. "It's all about trying to open up the news agenda a bit."

However the bulletin, airing on weeknights at 8pm from 10 October, will not try to compete with its sibling, Channel 4 News, which broadcasts an hour earlier. Both are produced by ITN, which has the option of re-versioning the day's top-line stories and asking guests from C4 News to remain for the later bulletin.

A series of "video columnists" are also being employed to offer fresh views on the day's news.

Over time new interactive elements aiming to "democratise the news" will also be introduced. Fewell hopes to "move beyond the fairly two-dimensional relationship of people texting in, or emailing in their comments about the news. "Bringing members of the public into the studio, holding online debates and allowing viewers to submit their own stories are all ideas being considered.

More4 News will use the same studio as C4 News but will have a different lighting design and graphical look.
Jonathan H837 posts since 17 May 2004
cat posted:
Hardly original thinking. CNN World Report has been doing that for the past 20 years.


They didn't say it was original, did they? Although for a domestic UK news service, it probably is a largely new idea isn't it?
NickyS1,570 posts since 1 Apr 2001
None of this is confirmed - but I heard through the grapevine they will have a panel of about 20 regular contributors who will appear to give a view on certain stories - these will not be balanced in a traditional sense so you will have a certain person's view on a story - i suppose like Fox give a certain view. And I assume that as long as that's clear they don't have any problems with Ofcom.
HBox155 posts since 16 Nov 2004
NickyS posted:
None of this is confirmed - but I heard through the grapevine they will have a panel of about 20 regular contributors who will appear to give a view on certain stories - these will not be balanced in a traditional sense so you will have a certain person's view on a story - i suppose like Fox give a certain view. And I assume that as long as that's clear they don't have any problems with Ofcom.


Hmm, I prefer news to be broadcast primarily in an un-biased as it comes way. Otherwise you risk tainting and corrupting it with a person's opinion. Opinions in a small amount aren't bad, but they shouldn't be allowed to overpower the news.
Jonathan H837 posts since 17 May 2004
HBox posted:
NickyS posted:
None of this is confirmed - but I heard through the grapevine they will have a panel of about 20 regular contributors who will appear to give a view on certain stories - these will not be balanced in a traditional sense so you will have a certain person's view on a story - i suppose like Fox give a certain view. And I assume that as long as that's clear they don't have any problems with Ofcom.


Hmm, I prefer news to be broadcast primarily in an un-biased as it comes way. Otherwise you risk tainting and corrupting it with a person's opinion. Opinions in a small amount aren't bad, but they shouldn't be allowed to overpower the news.


Fair enough, but shouldn't the news operations of 'lesser' channels be free to explore more distinctive ways of presenting and commentating on news? Otherwise we'd end up with all news programmes looking the same. For example, who'd have thought you could get a concise and intelligent summary of the stories of the day in just one minute? But 60 Seconds on BBC Three does it very well. If you want bog-standard, straight-talking news, head for one of the main terrestrial broadcasters.

I guess as long as opinion is always expressed as such, there's not really a problem. I've always found it interesting how, in the UK, we (rightly) expect our television news to be thoroughly impartial, and yet we fully accept that the vast majority of our newspaper news is not.
TedJrr204 posts since 11 Sep 2005
cat posted:
...... by the time the ITN contract expired that the BBC would be legally obliged to provide news on ITV to ensure that ITV could fulfil their licence agreements with the Government.


No, its ITV that would have been obliged to honour its own licence terms, the BBC would have had no obligation to bail them out. ITV would have had to bring the operation in-house, or contract with another third party.

You always get this brinkmanship with ITN contract renawals, but (honestly) whe else is ever going to supply C4 and ITV?
Moz5,542 posts since 4 Jan 2003
Londoner posted:
There's a glimpse of the More4 News logo/graphics in the Radio Times - p8

Thanks, but as I don't happen to have a copy here that's not very useful. Any chance you could scan it in?