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Steve in Pudsey10,352 posts since 4 Jan 2003
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
I guess this is designed for Instagram/YouTube where this kind of audience is already well used to watching stuff with "limited" production values and delivered by people who aren't exactly experienced presenters, so for the target demographic I think it's fine.

I'm surprised Radio 1 Newsbeat hasn't already done something like this - particularly since the demise of BBC Three and 60 Seconds. They already have the expertise in making news accessible to this demographic.
Write that down in your copybook now.
JAS844,133 posts since 26 Aug 2010
Yorkshire Look North (E.Yorks & Lincs)
This seems to be inspired by Sky News, The Guardian, NBC News and others’ attempts to broadcast news through Snapchat and Instagram. There’s plenty of competition so it’ll be interesting to see how they differentiate.

Sky have also been making the "First News Live" programme for primary school children for quite a while now.
https://live.firstnews.co.uk/
I've heard of the First News children's newspaper, but I didn't know they were directly competing with Newsround by having a programme.
Jon8,042 posts since 11 Apr 2005
Central (West) Midlands Today
This seems to be inspired by Sky News, The Guardian, NBC News and others’ attempts to broadcast news through Snapchat and Instagram. There’s plenty of competition so it’ll be interesting to see how they differentiate.

Sky have also been making the "First News Live" programme for primary school children for quite a while now.
https://live.firstnews.co.uk/
I've heard of the First News children's newspaper, but I didn't know they were directly competing with Newsround by having a programme.

Well they’re not directly competing, are they?
London Lite10,796 posts since 4 Jan 2003
London London


Having now watched the bulletin in full, I agree that the presenter probably could do with pausing slightly between sentences. However, I don't agree that Newsround should be modelled. Newsround is aimed at 6-10 year-olds, whereas this is for 14-17 year-olds. The presenters of Newsround sound pretty patronising,


Patronising? Have you ever watched a full bulletin? Those young presenters on NR have a difficult job writing and producing copy to an audience where news isn't the most important thing in their lives and when they do have to explain some very serious news to kids, they do that exemplary. It's a challenging job for a journalist to provide news for that demographic which actually goes up to 12 year olds (it used to be 15 when CBBC catered to teenagers).

Going back to The Rundown. Does it really need the presenter to be in-vision? They could easily narrate the bulletin and let the pictures and captions tell the story.
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Capybara112 posts since 24 Jul 2018
Granada North West Today

Going back to The Rundown. Does it really need the presenter to be in-vision? They could easily narrate the bulletin and let the pictures and captions tell the story.

I must admit, I did find it a bit bizarre that the presenter's head and neck seemed to be popping up out of the headline.
Aspiring continuity announcer.
itsrobert6,387 posts since 23 Mar 2001
Granada North West Today


Having now watched the bulletin in full, I agree that the presenter probably could do with pausing slightly between sentences. However, I don't agree that Newsround should be modelled. Newsround is aimed at 6-10 year-olds, whereas this is for 14-17 year-olds. The presenters of Newsround sound pretty patronising,


Patronising? Have you ever watched a full bulletin? Those young presenters on NR have a difficult job writing and producing copy to an audience where news isn't the most important thing in their lives and when they do have to explain some very serious news to kids, they do that exemplary. It's a challenging job for a journalist to provide news for that demographic which actually goes up to 12 year olds (it used to be 15 when CBBC catered to teenagers).


Yes, I have. Quite recently, in fact. I do think their tone is quite patronising - it certainly never used to be. My point was that ITV's own research showed a desire for a news bulletin that treated adolescents seriously. That's because Newsround talks to the audience like they're very young. Which is fine for its demographic, but totally inappropriate for people around the age of 16 or 17.

P.S. I note in your quoting of my post that you snipped off "which is fine for their audience, but I don't think that would work at all for older adolescents" - which qualified my point.
London Lite10,796 posts since 4 Jan 2003
London London


Having now watched the bulletin in full, I agree that the presenter probably could do with pausing slightly between sentences. However, I don't agree that Newsround should be modelled. Newsround is aimed at 6-10 year-olds, whereas this is for 14-17 year-olds. The presenters of Newsround sound pretty patronising,


Patronising? Have you ever watched a full bulletin? Those young presenters on NR have a difficult job writing and producing copy to an audience where news isn't the most important thing in their lives and when they do have to explain some very serious news to kids, they do that exemplary. It's a challenging job for a journalist to provide news for that demographic which actually goes up to 12 year olds (it used to be 15 when CBBC catered to teenagers).


Yes, I have. Quite recently, in fact. I do think their tone is quite patronising - it certainly never used to be. My point was that ITV's own research showed a desire for a news bulletin that treated adolescents seriously. That's because Newsround talks to the audience like they're very young. Which is fine for its demographic, but totally inappropriate for people around the age of 16 or 17.


Newsround hasn't changed that much bar presenter changes. It continues to be a beacon of public service broadcasting, alas more unloved on a digital channel rather than on BBC1, yet The Rundown isn't quite yet the finished product, which includes the delivery of the presenter. Getting the news right is 85% of the product, getting teenagers to watch it on the adult skewed ITV News Instagram is another.
Steve in Pudsey10,352 posts since 4 Jan 2003
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
This is where I go into old git mode, because I can't let the suggestion that Newsround hasn't changed much go without comment.

Compare and contrast the same day's John Craven's Newsround and BBC Early Evening News from 1982. I'm struggling to see much fundamental difference between the two programmes other than the selection of stories and Newsround explaining things in more detail.



Granted, Newsround's target audience changed and is focussed towards younger kids than it was in my day, but having watched both of today's editions the programme itself is certainly a lot more lightweight than it once was.

I don't think patronising is the word I would use, what news there was on the programme was delivered in a perfectly acceptable way, but on both the breakfast and teatime editions today there was only one news story, followed by some pointless viewer submitted videos (that are definitely not news), and an and finally.

There is a big gap between this and "grown up" news that was never there when I was its target demographic.

As a now 40 year old, I watch the John Craven bulletin and I don't think I would necessarily realise it was aimed at kids if I didn't know.

None of this is necessarily a criticism of the current Newsround, times change, but something to fill that gap between Newsround and News - especially now 60 Seconds has gone - is not a bad idea.
Last edited by Steve in Pudsey on 20 September 2019 10:01pm
Write that down in your copybook now.
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London Lite10,796 posts since 4 Jan 2003
London London
This is where I go into old git mode, because I can't let the suggestion that Newsround hasn't changed much go without comment.

Compare and contrast the same day's John Craven's Newsround and BBC Early Evening News from 1982. I'm struggling to see much fundamental difference between the two programmes other than the selection of stories and Newsround explaining things in more detail.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RGi9NlJE6iU

Granted, Newsround's target audience changed and is focussed towards younger kids than it was in my day, but the programme itself is certainly a lot more lightweight than it once was.

I don't think patronising is the word I would use, what news there was on the programme was delivered in a perfectly acceptable way, but on both the breakfast and teatime editions today there was only one news story, followed by some pointless viewer submitted videos (that are definitely not news), and an and finally.

There is a big gap between this and "grown up" news that was never there when I was its target demographic.

As a now 40 year old, I watch the John Craven bulletin and I don't think I would necessarily realise it was aimed at kids if I didn't know.

None of this is necessarily a criticism of the current Newsround, times change, but something to fill that gap between Newsround and News - especially now 60 Seconds has gone - is not a bad idea.


However I'd debate that John had a unique way of delivering news to children, despite the lack of gimmicks. John was the USP in those days, rather than having child-centric sets and presentation, yet kids watched in their droves in the 70s and 80s including myself.

The current Newsround hasn't really changed editorially since CBBC was relaunched as a stand alone channel, times have changed obviously and there isn't the Harry Potter plugs that they had in the noughties, yet the core elements of having a 20 or young 30 something presenter delivering the news in an accessible manner is still there targeting tweens.
Markymark7,219 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
This is where I go into old git mode, because I can't let the suggestion that Newsround hasn't changed much go without comment.

Compare and contrast the same day's John Craven's Newsround and BBC Early Evening News from 1982. I'm struggling to see much fundamental difference between the two programmes other than the selection of stories and Newsround explaining things in more detail.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RGi9NlJE6iU

Granted, Newsround's target audience changed and is focussed towards younger kids than it was in my day, but the programme itself is certainly a lot more lightweight than it once was.

I don't think patronising is the word I would use, what news there was on the programme was delivered in a perfectly acceptable way, but on both the breakfast and teatime editions today there was only one news story, followed by some pointless viewer submitted videos (that are definitely not news), and an and finally.

There is a big gap between this and "grown up" news that was never there when I was its target demographic.

As a now 40 year old, I watch the John Craven bulletin and I don't think I would necessarily realise it was aimed at kids if I didn't know.

None of this is necessarily a criticism of the current Newsround, times change, but something to fill that gap between Newsround and News - especially now 60 Seconds has gone - is not a bad idea.


However I'd debate that John had a unique way of delivering news to children, despite the lack of gimmicks. John was the USP in those days, rather than having child-centric sets and presentation, yet kids watched in their droves in the 70s and 80s including myself.

The current Newsround hasn't really changed editorially since CBBC was relaunched as a stand alone channel, times have changed obviously and there isn't the Harry Potter plugs that they had in the noughties, yet the core elements of having a 20 or young 30 something presenter delivering the news in an accessible manner is still there targeting tweens.


Well I've not watched Newsround for 40 years, which is when I ceased being a child. JC was a bit like your twenty something teacher at school, who fell into the camp of being 'alright' and not like the miserable older gits, so consequently you absorbed and respected what was being said.
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peterrocket1,375 posts since 5 Sep 2001
It's a UK version of NBC's popular 'Stay Tuned' Snapchat news show... but what works in the US may not be the same here.

Remember, TV Forum isn't the target audience.
TIGHazard538 posts since 3 Jan 2014
Tyne Tees Look North (North East)


Having now watched the bulletin in full, I agree that the presenter probably could do with pausing slightly between sentences. However, I don't agree that Newsround should be modelled. Newsround is aimed at 6-10 year-olds, whereas this is for 14-17 year-olds. The presenters of Newsround sound pretty patronising,


Patronising? Have you ever watched a full bulletin? Those young presenters on NR have a difficult job writing and producing copy to an audience where news isn't the most important thing in their lives and when they do have to explain some very serious news to kids, they do that exemplary. It's a challenging job for a journalist to provide news for that demographic which actually goes up to 12 year olds (it used to be 15 when CBBC catered to teenagers).

Going back to The Rundown. Does it really need the presenter to be in-vision? They could easily narrate the bulletin and let the pictures and captions tell the story.


I don't envy them at all, My strongest memory of Newsround is them explaining 7/7 the day of, or the day after it happened.

And then CBBC had that one-off drama a year or so later which followed a group of Muslim (or Sikh) kids on the day. "I'm not letting any of your kind on my bus" is a line that sticks with me.