« Topics
1234...212223
Rkolsen2,008 posts since 20 Jan 2014
BBC World
Well if AG is used correctly it is brilliant. The Weather Channel in Atlanta has been using for a few years now in their various studios. And I think its a great way of explaing complex weather, than just the vague weather by certain broadcasters (ie "its going to be blustery windy weather with showery rains"....gonna to need to know more that!)
Tornado
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mclPB06sCYY
Storm Surge
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=meKVxT5Hc2A


They’ve had some interesting demonstrations. Some are powered by Viz and the others by TWC MAX ecosystem.

One I saw recently was about clearing the snow off the roof of your car. For example if there’s a length of four feet of snow that’s four inches thick it weighs over 100 lbs. And if your driving down the highway and it falls off the car behind it is hit by 10 tons of force.

1
Mouseboy33 gave kudos
Mouseboy332,206 posts since 10 Feb 2014
I love how OTT Boston's WHDH is. Its the sister station of Miami's WSVN. They have been dealing with horrific Nor'Easters for the last few weeks so they have been pulling out all the stops. The piece of OTT "brilliance" appears
*
I said what I said!
Rkolsen2,008 posts since 20 Jan 2014
BBC World
I love how OTT Boston's WHDH is. Its the sister station of Miami's WSVN. They have been dealing with horrific Nor'Easters for the last few weeks so they have been pulling out all the stops. The piece of OTT "brilliance" appears
*


See the person in the middle taking a selfie?
Mouseboy332,206 posts since 10 Feb 2014
Well Boston is experiencing its 3rd NorEaster in 1 week. Absolutely increadible. WHDH Boston, the tabloid sister station of infamous WSVN Miami, has been doing extended coverage. They have more time for increased coverage as they are now and unaffiliated independent station. YOu can watch the coverage here and see how they use their NewsPlex studio and video walls. The live pictures of the winter storm are quite incredible. BUt also how local officials are responding to the storm.
https://whdh.com/on-air-live-stream/
I said what I said!
Le Neko144 posts since 29 Aug 2016
At 1:23 in the video, a weather report on Portuguese news channel RTP Informação (now RTP 3) in 2012 during the Jornal das 14 .

Now fact me 'til I fart!
Rkolsen2,008 posts since 20 Jan 2014
BBC World
I've been surprised that stations or regions in the UK don't run crawls for severe weather during normal programming where it is common place in the US. Here's an example of a fairly advanced ticker that appears at the top of the screen that includes a live radar image, description of the warning and a county by county breakdown of the alert and when it expires. Sometimes an additional line appears when there are multiple warnings for a singular area.



Hopefully this is not taken down. I cropped out most of the video and removed the audio.
Hatton Cross2,760 posts since 4 Jan 2003
Central (West) Midlands Today
(as posted above, whilst I was typing this out...)

Yes, but the Met Office issues colour coded weather alerts in advance over here - and it's reported on the main network news (BBC One, ITV, C4, C5, Sky News and BBC News channel - and the last twos own tickers scroll the weather warnings as well), BBC/ITV regional news, and national/local weather forecasts for TV, Radio and On-line, plus retweets via social media all mention it with increasingly manic hysteria - so you've got to have your head in a tub of readymix concrete not to know there's something ominious on the way with the weather.

It's not uncommon for captions about the weather, though.
I can remember seeing a couple of lower thirds from BBC Midlands, appearing over a network programme back in the 1980's during a unusually strong wind and heavy snows. Schools were closed, public transport winding down, and the caption was directing people to their local BBC Local Radio station were the 'snow desks' were all fired up and ready to go with the latest information.

And to be honest, local radio (mainly BBC, but commercial radio - does as well, when it's forecast to be bad) is still the go to place for people to find out where the drifts and road closures are.
Crawlers, tickers and lower/upper thirds would just be repeating information already given out.
Another Hatton Cross Comment
Parts of this post have been edited but does not affect the outcome. Portions Recorded. All Rights Reserved. (c) MMXVIII
WW Update4,064 posts since 6 Feb 2007
This is how HR, one of the regional ARD broadcasters in Germany, handles weather warnings. When severe weather threatens the viewing region, a special bug appears on the upper right of the screen; it directs viewers to check a special teletext page (most TV sets in Germany are teletext-compatible) for detailed information:

*
*
Images: hr.de
Last edited by WW Update on 21 March 2018 12:56am
2
Mouseboy33 and Le Neko gave kudos
Rkolsen2,008 posts since 20 Jan 2014
BBC World
This is how HR, one of the regional ARD broadcasters in Germany, handles weather warnings. When severe weather threatens the viewing region, a special bug appears on the upper right of the screen; it directs viewers to check a special teletext page (most TV sets in Germany are teletext-compatible) for detailed information:

*
*
Images: hr.de


Stations also do those here as well. They have to legally run a ticker during severe weather warnings.

*
(as posted above, whilst I was typing this out...)

Yes, but the Met Office issues colour coded weather alerts in advance over here - and it's reported on the main network news (BBC One, ITV, C4, C5, Sky News and BBC News channel - and the last twos own tickers scroll the weather warnings as well), BBC/ITV regional news, and national/local weather forecasts for TV, Radio and On-line, plus retweets via social media all mention it with increasingly manic hysteria - so you've got to have your head in a tub of readymix concrete not to know there's something ominious on the way with the weather.

It's not uncommon for captions about the weather, though.
I can remember seeing a couple of lower thirds from BBC Midlands, appearing over a network programme back in the 1980's during a unusually strong wind and heavy snows. Schools were closed, public transport winding down, and the caption was directing people to their local BBC Local Radio station were the 'snow desks' were all fired up and ready to go with the latest information.

And to be honest, local radio (mainly BBC, but commercial radio - does as well, when it's forecast to be bad) is still the go to place for people to find out where the drifts and road closures are.
Crawlers, tickers and lower/upper thirds would just be repeating information already given out.


The national weather service issues advisories, watches and warnings and stations are to dissseminate the information. If you a radio station covers a large area it may be a while for the inform to get out.

Some stations do things such as “First Alert Weather Days” to warn you in advance that conditions maybe bad. Sometimes first alert are called for days in advanced or the day of.

Broadcast television is our go to to thing here when it comes to weather issues and closing. If it’s bad enough radio will usually simulcast TV. With things like snow there’s still something special to kids (and adults) to see that the school district or offices are closed at the bottom of the screen. Even though there are text message and robocall alerts television is still the most effective way to get the message across the quickly and probably most frequently.