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Rkolsen1,380 posts since 20 Jan 2014
BBC World


Finally, don't tell people that the warnings are "life or death" and "you will die" if you go outdoors, then do stuff like this:



Is anyone impressed by this BS any more?

In the UK of course, people would turn to local radio as their main source of info during emergencies, and regional TV news for localised emergencies as well. Anything bigger, and it would be national news - so yet again, proves we don't have a gap that needs filled by ultra-local TV.


A lot of times the reporters and crews are trained in these situations. They know their actions and often times are directed / authorized by local authorities to stay in certain locations. The crews also know when to pack it up and move to higher ground.
Mouseboy331,900 posts since 10 Feb 2014
WSB 2 - Atlanta providing live coverage of a Tornado within the Metro Atlanta. Debris is being lofted into the air and is being picked up by their radar.
WXIA 11 Alive (NBC)
WAGA FOX 5
WGCL CBS 46
are all in rolling coverage.
http://www.wsbtv.com/live-stream


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Last edited by Mouseboy33 on 30 November 2016 7:21pm - 2 times in total
I said what I said!
Rkolsen1,380 posts since 20 Jan 2014
BBC World
This isn't exactly severe weather related but still neat. With the Super Bowl coming up in Houston many of the local broadcasters are broadcasting from Discovery Green which is a park where a lot of the events leading up to the Super Bowl are taking place. Telemundo Houston (KTMD) , despite not airing the game, appears to be broadcasting all their evening newscasts from there. In most instances when a show goes on the road or is outside broadcast the meteorologist is stuck back in the studio. But due to advances in technology the meteorologist now can control their graphics and telestrate from the field using a tablet. So Telemundo built "augmented reality" graphics to be used outdoors.


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Brekkie gave kudos
Mouseboy331,900 posts since 10 Feb 2014
I might wrong but I dont think Ive seen hand tracking used for weather forecasting anywhere else. Its been used in North America and primarily the US for a few years now. The technology has improved over the years and seems to be getting better. Some meteorologists seem to like while others stay away from it. Some use it for certain elements. Those that like it use it mainly during on air analysis in severe weather coverage. As it allows on the meterologist to manipulate maps and data on the fly on air instead of running back and forth to the desk. This could be done off air but the connection with the viewer is lost. And the coverage is less compelling without a face to go with it.
Kinda Cool if you've never seen it used before. Here are some examples

Last edited by Mouseboy33 on 15 February 2017 5:00pm
I said what I said!