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elmarko1,081 posts since 27 Jul 2010
STV Central Reporting Scotland
No, I was watching KTLA and it zoomed out wide, but ABC7 had the entire thing with him going down, getting up, and going down again.

Also, Stu Mundel is the nicest guy, follows me on Twitter now weirdly. Always good to talk to and posts some nice behind the scenes stuff - recommended!

(Also if you ask nicely he'll give you a shout out from the helicopter Wink )
Mouseboy332,771 posts since 10 Feb 2014
I watched the end of the chase as well on KABC site and I was a bit suprised they were so tight on the suspect. Especially when they saw him digging around in that bag. I had a feeling it wasnt going to end well at all. Oh LA. What a mess you are.
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https://youtu.be/1g18oiI2WIU
Rkolsen3,030 posts since 20 Jan 2014
BBC World News
There apparently was a motorcycle chase here in Baltimore today that lasted for an hour. Unfortunately it ended when the woman driving lost control at a backed up traffic light. Apparently she slid under the car and the motorcycle reportedly flew 40 feet.

Also with this horrific tower block fire going on in London I'm wondering why the news helicopters haven't been deployed. The current vantage points are a bit far back. But with the long lenses they helicopters can get up close while being a safe distance away. Praying that there aren't any fatalities.
Don’t let anyone treat you like you’re a VO/SOT when you’re a PKG.
Markymark7,469 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
Presumably because it was night time. No doubt there will be chopper pictures this morning. Flying a helicopter at night over a residential area is only going to attract complaints.


And expensive, and as discussed with other recent events, there's a tiny audience overnight, I'm not sure
it would have been terribly appropriate to have seen the trapped occupants in any form of close up too ?

I switched on BBC Breakfast just after 07:00hrs one of the choppers were providing pictures.
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noggin14,679 posts since 26 Jun 2001
Presumably because it was night time. No doubt there will be chopper pictures this morning. Flying a helicopter at night over a residential area is only going to attract complaints.


There was at least one helicopter over the scene from soon after the fire broke out (I could see the fire from where I live) - so I doubt noise was a major consideration in this case (though it may be an overarching one).
noggin14,679 posts since 26 Jun 2001

Also with this horrific tower block fire going on in London I'm wondering why the news helicopters haven't been deployed. The current vantage points are a bit far back. But with the long lenses they helicopters can get up close while being a safe distance away. Praying that there aren't any fatalities.


I'm not sure you need close-up pictures to see an entire tower block engulfed in flames.

Sure they are one way of telling the story and providing a 'live holding feed' - but the US obsessions with helicopter coverage is always a bit bemusing this side of the pond.

As we know - and many of us feared - there have been fatalities, and some very distressing pictures of people trapped in their flats have been broadcast (which is a questionable decision)
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Markymark7,469 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
Presumably because it was night time. No doubt there will be chopper pictures this morning. Flying a helicopter at night over a residential area is only going to attract complaints.


There was at least one helicopter over the scene from soon after the fire broke out (I could see the fire from where I live) - so I doubt noise was a major consideration in this case (though it may be an overarching one).


Any (and every) helicopter over the scene would also have been interpreted by some who were trapped as a rescue effort, so having a TV one there is just compounding and extending the distress even further.
Hatton Cross3,370 posts since 4 Jan 2003
Central (West) Midlands Today
Here's a question. Pretty quickly a major incident was called on this tragic incident.

As it happened 'in the middle of the night' so to speak, does that in newsrooms put out an alert to more senior editors, to come in and help out?
I know places like Sky and the BBC have experienced editors rostered on overnight shifts in any case, but would the numbers swelled slightly to cover this, once the enormity was unfolding?
My user name might look like Hatton Cross, but it's pronounced Throatwobbler Mangrove.
Inspector Sands14,142 posts since 25 Aug 2004
Not sure what happens in terms of staffing but in such an event it's more important to have extra producers rather than senior editors. They're the ones who actually process and produce the content that's seen on air
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