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Jonathan H837 posts since 17 May 2004
StuartPlymouth posted:
Lewis c posted:
But a BA Trident stalled on take off and crashed in a field near Staines back in 1972 there were NO survivors .

36 years is along time without an accident at the world's busiest airport!

Forgive me. I know I'm being picky. Heathrow is the world's busiest international airport. There. I feel better now. Wink
Lewis c913 posts since 4 Jan 2003
StuartPlymouth posted:
Lewis c posted:
But a BA Trident stalled on take off and crashed in a field near Staines back in 1972 there were NO survivors .

36 years is along time without an accident at the world's busiest airport!


Yes i know that Rolling Eyes

If you read my post i was replying to BBC Worlds post who said " it was unthinkable that such a thing would happen at LHR BA's base" I was ONLY saying it happend back in 1972 .Give me strength Shocked
Seb1,239 posts since 13 Sep 2005
StuartPlymouth posted:
[

BBC fared badly I think, although by the time it got to "Newsnight" they had picked up on the engine failure story.


Actually News 24 were one of the first to break the story in the afternoon, definitely before 4pm when one of their reporters had spoken to an airport worker who had supposedly spoken to the pilot. However because BA's line on the matter was not to comment on rumour or speculation, the BBC seeming didn't put too much emphasis on this as being gospel truth, which seems reasonable.
Brekkie31,391 posts since 4 Jan 2003
BBC WORLD posted:
Did BBC or ITN anchor the Ten from the scene? I would like to think that they did, given that the incident only occurred a few moments from their HQ's.



I don't think the BBC did - what i saw of the Ten o'clock News had George Aligiah in the studio covering the story.


As others have said though, Mark Austin was there at 6.30pm and Julie Etchingham at 10pm for ITV.


"only moments from their HQs" though is the key point to this story - if it had happened at Manchester or Birmingham or elsewhere, it wouldn't have got anywhere near as much coverage.
gilsta531 posts since 8 Apr 2006
BBC News website top stories were very inappropriate for a time yesterday evening, the top story was obviously about the crash - "Plane Crashes on Landing..." but the second story said "PM Touches Down for China Visit". I couldn't think of a more insensitive way to say Gordy Brown had arrived in China given the days events.
Connews844 posts since 29 Oct 2006
gilsta posted:
BBC News website top stories were very inappropriate for a time yesterday evening, the top story was obviously about the crash - "Plane Crashes on Landing..." but the second story said "PM Touches Down for China Visit". I couldn't think of a more insensitive way to say Gordy Brown had arrived in China given the days events.


You think that is inappropriate?

*

Laughing

Facking Google.
JamesWorldNews7,877 posts since 22 Aug 2004
Brekkie Boy posted:
[

"only moments from their HQs" though is the key point to this story - if it had happened at Manchester or Birmingham or elsewhere, it wouldn't have got anywhere near as much coverage.


My point exactly, BB.
BBC LDN1,527 posts since 6 Jan 2003
Gosh, I never even realised that TV Forum has integrated adverts in the post area; I can't even remember the last time I visited the forum without being signed in!
Tom0735 posts since 16 Dec 2007
StuartPlymouth posted:
BBC WORLD posted:
Did BBC or ITN anchor the Ten from the scene? I would like to think that they did, given that the incident only occurred a few moments from their HQ's.

ITV/ITN anchored from Heathrow for the early evening news. The newly re-launched "News at Ten" was left with a smug Trevor McDonald on his own at 10pm, with a wind-swept Julie stuck on the same crane 20ft above the ground that their advertised "on the spot reporter" had been on only 3 hours before.

BBC fared badly I think, although by the time it got to "Newsnight" they had picked up on the engine failure story. ITV/ITN had coverered it better in terms of possible explanations though (and believe me, that's unusual for me to think that), they had done quite alot of background research when BBC were just messing about doing reports from passengers.

This wasn't just a change in what was on News at Ten, this was evident on the 6:30 bulletin. Is this a real change in editorial control we are seeing?


The news happened to have been broken to me when BBC News was on in the background. After the report, I had no idea what had happened except a plane had fell out of the sky and everyone had survived. I didn't hear anything of it until the ITV Evening News and News at Ten, and they explained it so much better and News at Ten were great with the simulations and explanations.