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DVB Cornwall7,725 posts since 4 Dec 2003
Westcountry Spotlight
David Bond is named as the new BBC Sports Editor

The BBC has appointed Daily Telegraph sports editor David Bond as its new sports editor to succeed Mihir Bose.

Bond will take up his role in 2010, a year which includes the World Cup.

He will provide analysis and context to the major sports news stories and events across the BBC's news and sports services on TV, radio and online.

more ...

BBC News
Stitch08501 posts since 24 Nov 2007
East Midlands Today
It's been a while since Bose left hasn't it? Who stepped into his role before this appointment?


Nobody as far as I can tell - the Sports Editors blog has been dormant since his departure. James Pearce seems to have covered most of the big stories for TV, but he's still been titled Sports News Correspondent.
deejay2,778 posts since 5 Jan 2003
Central (South) Oxford
The BBC seem to be going through a phase of assuming that journos are journos and that the disciplines for writing for print and writing for television are much the same. Actually, the wider problem within the Beeb is that once again there is an assumption that journalists shouldn't specialise in one medium - that it should be fine for one person to be sent on a story and file for television, radio and the web. This seems totally logical on paper and an utterly sensible use of resources. While it can work some of the time, it can also lead to huge battles between programmes for lives, first dibbs on the reporter and so on and huge stress on the individual out in the field. Who do they file for first? Bi-Media working (as it was then called) was introduced under John Birt and it's never really gone away, despite it being separated officially in more recent years. Now it's back on the agenda again, under the auspices of MultiMedia - central newsgathering, probably in preparation for the move back to W1, is all combined again and in the regions, many people work across at least two media.

It will be very intresting to see how this new Sports News Editor works on screen - his predecessor never looked particularly comfortable. I'm still thoroughly spooked by Robert Peston ...
Two minutes regions...
Bob Paisley434 posts since 9 Aug 2005
London London
The BBC seem to be going through a phase of assuming that journos are journos and that the disciplines for writing for print and writing for television are much the same. Actually, the wider problem within the Beeb is that once again there is an assumption that journalists shouldn't specialise in one medium - that it should be fine for one person to be sent on a story and file for television, radio and the web. This seems totally logical on paper and an utterly sensible use of resources. While it can work some of the time, it can also lead to huge battles between programmes for lives, first dibbs on the reporter and so on and huge stress on the individual out in the field. Who do they file for first? Bi-Media working (as it was then called) was introduced under John Birt and it's never really gone away, despite it being separated officially in more recent years. Now it's back on the agenda again, under the auspices of MultiMedia - central newsgathering, probably in preparation for the move back to W1, is all combined again and in the regions, many people work across at least two media.

It will be very intresting to see how this new Sports News Editor works on screen - his predecessor never looked particularly comfortable. I'm still thoroughly spooked by Robert Peston ...


Although I agree with a lot of what you say - I sense that this appointment (like similar appointments made in the past - ie: Peston, Jeff Randall, Mihir Bose) is a symptom of the BBC's inherant inferiority complex when it comes to Fleet Street.

I think there's a general sense in journalism that print journalists are 'proper' journalists and that broadcast journalists are fly-by-night pretty boys and pretty girls who turn up late for any story and follow the print agenda. Print journalists are seasoned hacks who turn up exlusives and know how to do a proper job. I think that's why the Beeb keep bringing in newspaper men to pick up some original scoops.

This latest appointment seems to follow that trend. Having said that, I would hope that following the Bose debacle they may have made sure this chap knows how to speak out loud and stand in front of a camera.
Brekkie29,992 posts since 4 Jan 2003 Recently warned
HTV Wales Wales Today
It's been a while since Bose left hasn't it? Who stepped into his role before this appointment?


Nobody as far as I can tell - the Sports Editors blog has been dormant since his departure. James Pearce seems to have covered most of the big stories for TV, but he's still been titled Sports News Correspondent.

Mihir Bose never posted to the blog anyway - remember he was effectively sports editor for BBC News. Roger Mosey (and now Barbara Slater) are the actual sports editors at the BBC.

In many ways, this role is redundant really and I don't think a direct replacement is that justified.
Shouldn't that have been posted in the "John Logie Baird has Invented Television" thread?
House3,168 posts since 13 Mar 2007
Tyne Tees Look North (North East)
Roger Mosey (and now Barbara Slater) are the actual sports editors at the BBC.

In many ways, this role is redundant really and I don't think a direct replacement is that justified.


That doesn't really work though as "editors" on television news are more about the actual output rather than strategy. Roger Mosey and Barbara Slater were both appointed Director of Sports, a managerial role. Roger Mosey has become head of 2012 planning...
guardian.co.uk posted:
He will oversee the corporation's sport and cultural plans for what will be the biggest event the UK has ever hosted - and the biggest ever BBC production.


...hardly the same role as Mihir Bowes had. Equally I highly doubt that Stephanie Flanders or Nick Robinson are actually in charge of the BBC's economical and political direction... even if they do have some involvement.

The role of Sports/ Home/ Economics/ Business/ Politics editor at the BBC is more about reporting - being the senior person the beeb can call on when big stories break - and breaking big stories (through their many contacts and influence), as well as looking at the actual content that is going to make it to screen.


You don't really think Nick R gets to decide what direction the reporting will go over the next four years? Or how much reporting will be shown on BBC NC, BBC One, BBC Radio etc.?