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Neil Jones6,468 posts since 23 Dec 2001
Central (West) Midlands Today
That's not to say that everything still going out live needs to do so, for example its almost unbelievable that most, if not all, of the shopping channels are still broadcasting live (many 24/7).



Must admit that in curiosity of this point you make I also checked out the lower numbers on the EPG last night to see if all those "babes" were still writhing away naked expecting punters to call them and they were all there doing their late night stuff as they presumably usually do. Clearly they are key workers then!


Were they not twerking from home?


Last time I checked most of these channels looked like they'd already been forced through a webcam and blown up to SD resolution...
Markymark8,226 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today

Some entertainment programming is just as important too just to keep the morale of the nation up too - and to be fair to the main broadcasters at least it's probably costing them more to keep the likes of This Morning going than it would closing it down.


Yes, but the staff working on those shows should have a totally free choice whether to leave their homes to work on them. There's key workers, and there's key workers in this crisis.
thegeek5,524 posts since 1 Jan 2002
London London

I'm more concerned by the gimmick of the presenter, presenting from home, using what is clearly a proper broadcast set up, and lighting. Unless of course C4's presenters are now fully skilled engineers and lighting directors. I can't believe it doesn't involve several people in there to set it all up?


One producer and one cameraman using LiveU.

And the presenter, so three people in the confined space of an average British living room. I don't get it?

The cameraman can lock off the shot and go and have a cuppa in the kitchen?

I understand the concerns - I know folk who are doing their best to still make programming but at a safe distance from colleagues or working from home as best as possible.
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UKnews gave kudos
MrUdagawa62 posts since 20 Nov 2019
Tyne Tees London

One producer and one cameraman using LiveU.

And the presenter, so three people in the confined space of an average British living room. I don't get it?

The cameraman can lock off the shot and go and have a cuppa in the kitchen?

I understand the concerns - I know folk who are doing their best to still make programming but at a safe distance from colleagues or working from home as best as possible.


Agreed. These things are done via LiveU and can be done with one engineer keeping easily more than two metres away. Once lights are set up they don't need adjusting. Producer can work remotely too. So essentially it's just one person going into the presenter's home. And this sort of set up tends to be only done for high profile presenters who are leading a show, the rest are via skype or whatever - as Peston's clearly was. I personally think Peston would have worked better with Peston anchoring via LiveU.
Markymark8,226 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today

One producer and one cameraman using LiveU.

And the presenter, so three people in the confined space of an average British living room. I don't get it?

The cameraman can lock off the shot and go and have a cuppa in the kitchen?

I understand the concerns - I know folk who are doing their best to still make programming but at a safe distance from colleagues or working from home as best as possible.


Hang on though, households are not supposed to host visitors ?
noggin14,946 posts since 26 Jun 2001
And the presenter, so three people in the confined space of an average British living room. I don't get it?

The cameraman can lock off the shot and go and have a cuppa in the kitchen?

I understand the concerns - I know folk who are doing their best to still make programming but at a safe distance from colleagues or working from home as best as possible.


Hang on though, households are not supposed to host visitors ?


Yes - though that advice is primarily to avoid socialising - where a 2m exclusion rule won't be enforced rigidly, you may share crockery and glassware and food etc. and may relax your safety. (A lot of people have a sense that 'home is safe' at the moment)

It is possible to risk assess and mitigate the risk of a minimal crew filming in a single, isolated room in your house, at a safe distance and with the correct hygiene protocols in place.

HOWEVER - the audience perception of doing that may not be a good idea, even if the risk is minimal.

Chances are that The Steph Show will be deemed a public service programme on a public service broadcaster, and there will be support for it being broadcast.