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MA
manclad Granada North West Today

Really!? How on earth would that work in practice, and how would your deal with the sudden severe imbalance it would create? (putting aside the issue that dropping 20 tonnes of engine from the sky isn't a terribly good idea)


The aircraft would lurch violently to one side, alerting the pilots of a missing engine (until recently, the physical detachment of an engine was not alerted by any alarm in the cockpit. The aerodynamic behaviour of the aircraft would be the pilots’ first indication of a problem).

They would control the aircraft using the flight control surfaces with heavier rudder inputs to compensate for the single remaining engine on one side, which would - logically - attempt to make the aircraft turn in the air. Hard rudder in the opposite direction will bring the aircraft back on course.

Well, you did ask.............

Wolf Blitzer
CNN
Atlanta


Come on. It's another 6 weeks to go until April 1st

Engines fall do off unintentionally, of course

https://www.flightglobal.com/engine-falls-off-nationwide-airlines-737-200/77087.article


You mock but when an engine begins to disintegrate uncontrollably, it is better for the engine to detach and fall away. The position of the engines are usually such that it will cause minimal damage to the control surfaces if it does detach. It’s also one of the reasons why when engines are located on the back of the fuselage (not too common in new designs these days) the vertical stabiliser is a ‘T tail’.
MA
Markymark Meridian (Thames Valley) South Today

In certain scenarios, namely an uncontained engine failure as seen here, the engines are actually designed to detach should it begin to vibrate or disintegrate to an extent where it’s better for it to go.


Really!? How on earth would that work in practice, and how would your deal with the sudden severe imbalance it would create? (putting aside the issue that dropping 20 tonnes of engine from the sky isn't a terribly good idea)


It doesn't necessarily have to happen in the sky either - it sometimes happens whilst still on the runway.



The aircraft would lurch violently to one side, alerting the pilots of a missing engine (until recently, the physical detachment of an engine was not alerted by any alarm in the cockpit. The aerodynamic behaviour of the aircraft would be the pilots’ first indication of a problem).

They would control the aircraft using the flight control surfaces with heavier rudder inputs to compensate for the single remaining engine on one side, which would - logically - attempt to make the aircraft turn in the air. Hard rudder in the opposite direction will bring the aircraft back on course.

Well, you did ask.............

Wolf Blitzer
CNN
Atlanta


Come on. It's another 6 weeks to go until April 1st

Engines fall do off unintentionally, of course

https://www.flightglobal.com/engine-falls-off-nationwide-airlines-737-200/77087.article


You mock but when an engine begins to disintegrate uncontrollably, it is better for the engine to detach and fall away. The position of the engines are usually such that it will cause minimal damage to the control surfaces if it does detach. It’s also one of the reasons why when engines are located on the back of the fuselage (not too common in new designs these days) the vertical stabiliser is a ‘T tail’.


Are you telling me engines are mounted with explosive bolts?

I'd love to see official reading matter on this topic from Boeing, Airbus, the FAA, CAA or equivalent?
--
Avatar credit: © BBC, ITA, BREMA 1967
VA
valley

Really!? How on earth would that work in practice, and how would your deal with the sudden severe imbalance it would create? (putting aside the issue that dropping 20 tonnes of engine from the sky isn't a terribly good idea)


It doesn't necessarily have to happen in the sky either - it sometimes happens whilst still on the runway.



Come on. It's another 6 weeks to go until April 1st

Engines fall do off unintentionally, of course

https://www.flightglobal.com/engine-falls-off-nationwide-airlines-737-200/77087.article


You mock but when an engine begins to disintegrate uncontrollably, it is better for the engine to detach and fall away. The position of the engines are usually such that it will cause minimal damage to the control surfaces if it does detach. It’s also one of the reasons why when engines are located on the back of the fuselage (not too common in new designs these days) the vertical stabiliser is a ‘T tail’.


Are you telling me engines are mounted with explosive bolts?

I'd love to see official reading matter on this topic from Boeing, Airbus, the FAA, CAA or equivalent?

I believe some aircraft use shear pins, I'm fairly sure the only place you'd find explosive bolts on an aircraft would be on some aircraft which use that for emergency landing gear deployment.

Blimey, this thread is getting off-topic...
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MA
Markymark Meridian (Thames Valley) South Today
[quote="valley" pid="1293302"]

It doesn't necessarily have to happen in the sky either - it sometimes happens whilst still on the runway.



You mock but when an engine begins to disintegrate uncontrollably, it is better for the engine to detach and fall away. The position of the engines are usually such that it will cause minimal damage to the control surfaces if it does detach. It’s also one of the reasons why when engines are located on the back of the fuselage (not too common in new designs these days) the vertical stabiliser is a ‘T tail’.


Are you telling me engines are mounted with explosive bolts?

I'd love to see official reading matter on this topic from Boeing, Airbus, the FAA, CAA or equivalent?

I believe some aircraft use shear pins , I'm fairly sure the only place you'd find explosive bolts on an aircraft would be on some aircraft which use that for emergency landing gear deployment.

Blimey, this thread is getting off-topic...


Ok, now we're getting somewhere 👍

https://aviation.stackexchange.com/questions/24935/have-jet-engines-ever-sheared-off
--
Avatar credit: © BBC, ITA, BREMA 1967
GL
glondon London London

It doesn't necessarily have to happen in the sky either - it sometimes happens whilst still on the runway.



You mock but when an engine begins to disintegrate uncontrollably, it is better for the engine to detach and fall away. The position of the engines are usually such that it will cause minimal damage to the control surfaces if it does detach. It’s also one of the reasons why when engines are located on the back of the fuselage (not too common in new designs these days) the vertical stabiliser is a ‘T tail’.


Are you telling me engines are mounted with explosive bolts?

I'd love to see official reading matter on this topic from Boeing, Airbus, the FAA, CAA or equivalent?

I believe some aircraft use shear pins, I'm fairly sure the only place you'd find explosive bolts on an aircraft would be on some aircraft which use that for emergency landing gear deployment.

Blimey, this thread is getting off-topic...


I may as well add my two cents. I've worked in aviation (on the other side of the cockpit door!) for 25 years. I seem to remember being told during my very first training that in the case of a ditching/landing on water, the engines are designed to shear off. Not sure about mid-air though!
LivefromORL, Markymark and JamesWorldNews gave kudos
MA
manclad Granada North West Today


Are you telling me engines are mounted with explosive bolts?

I'd love to see official reading matter on this topic from Boeing, Airbus, the FAA, CAA or equivalent?

I believe some aircraft use shear pins, I'm fairly sure the only place you'd find explosive bolts on an aircraft would be on some aircraft which use that for emergency landing gear deployment.

Blimey, this thread is getting off-topic...


I may as well add my two cents. I've worked in aviation (on the other side of the cockpit door!) for 25 years. I seem to remember being told during my very first training that in the case of a ditching/landing on water, the engines are designed to shear off. Not sure about mid-air though!


Engines under the wing are actually an hinderance when ditching. True, the engines will come off but that’s a result of the engines scooping copious amounts of water and the resultant drag. That’s why ditching relies upon a whole lot luck as witnessed on the Hudson, the A320 had underslung engines so the calm river and the contact with the water was key to the success. Aircraft with engines on the rear fuselage are at an advantage for any ditching really though.

So yes, the engines do generally come off in a ditching if underslung but that’s more a result of the actual impact.

I should have said actually, I too work on the ‘blunt’ end of the flightdeck door.
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MA
Meridian AM Meridian (South) South Today
No Quest Means Business. They are sticking with the CNN US breaking coverage of Tiger.
AJ
AJB39
Understandable on this occasion. Tiger Woods is a huge sports star, known right around the world. It’s looks like a really bad accident. I hope he’ll be ok.
MA
Meridian AM Meridian (South) South Today
Yeah, hopefully.

CNNI's Don Riddell and Alex Thomas contributing now.
HE
headliner101 West Country (West) Points West
And Riddell was back on CNN moments ago. First time to see him on Domestic actually. But at least we can see CNN have a 'diverse' portfolio of news over these past few days.
MA
manclad Granada North West Today
And Riddell was back on CNN moments ago. First time to see him on Domestic actually. But at least we can see CNN have a 'diverse' portfolio of news over these past few days.


A long way from Yorkshire Television.
GL
glondon London London
The United States has just passed 500,000 deaths from Coronavirus, according to Johns Hopkins University.

CNN announced this special, hosted by Jake Tapper, to air later tonight:




There was a segment on CNN Newsroom with John Vause yesterday morning remembering the 500,000 that lost their lives. Another sign that CNNI has become an international station for American viewers. Here we have a program that is broadcast around the world (but not in the US) and no mention of the 2 million others that have passed. Guess they don't warrant a mention because they weren't American.
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