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Inspector Sands10,999 posts since 25 Aug 2004

No offense but what do you expect on a tour of a US based TV company. It's worth noting that the first electronic television was successfully demonstrated in San Francisco.

Yes its the distinction between television and electronic television that confuses the issue. American Philo Farnsworth is credited with the latter which is the system that succeeded

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And supposedly the oldest transmitting station is WRGB in 1928.

Oldest but it certainly wasn't the first. There had been transmissions of TV in the UK, US and Japan before that.

It's one of those technologies with lots of firsts as it's development took place in many places at roughly the same time
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noggin12,353 posts since 26 Jun 2001

No offense but what do you expect on a tour of a US based TV company. It's worth noting that the first electronic television was successfully demonstrated in San Francisco.

Yes its the distinction between television and electronic television that confuses the issue. American Philo Farnsworth is credited with the latter which is the system that succeeded


And it gets quite interconnected too. Baird had - I believe - licensed Farnsworth's Image Dissector electronic camera technology as a potential live source for his TV system - which otherwise relied on a mix of flying spot cameras and intermediate film... (ISTR that a fire caused Baird to lose quite a lot of equipment - including his Image Dissector cameras?)

AIUI the image dissector had a lot of practical issues - mainly around sensitivity, Zworykin's development of an electronic camera (not entirely his own work - it used technology partially developed by others) gave rise to the electronic camera that became the basis of the first cameras used on the Marconi 405 line system the BBC launched their 1936 service using.

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And supposedly the oldest transmitting station is WRGB in 1928.

Oldest but it certainly wasn't the first. There had been transmissions of TV in the UK, US and Japan before that.

It's one of those technologies with lots of firsts as it's development took place in many places at roughly the same time


Yes - it was always when not if TV was going to happen I think. It was an idea that arrived before the reality had actually developed - but it was clearly going to be 'a thing'.

It's amazing that in 10 years we went from something that was essentially an all mechanical, narrow-band, 32 line system to an an all electronic, wide-band, 405 line (377 line active) system that was so much better it was actually described at launch as 'high definition' (!)
Last edited by noggin on 17 July 2017 10:02am
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Inspector Sands gave kudos
Hatton Cross2,293 posts since 4 Jan 2003
Central (West) Midlands Today
Instead of embedding a ton of pictures check out these photos from NBC insider / editor / photographer Dennis Degan' showing the studio complete and under construction.


And confirms the neon peacock is placed at different field of vision depths so will look expanded out at different angles on shots on the jib.
ITV "Occasionally it gives us something good, but for the most part, it is pathetic and puerile". Lord Taylor, House Of Commons, 1959.
Mouseboy331,900 posts since 10 Feb 2014
WFOR 4 CBS - Miami is getting a O&O CBS mandate set. Light and bright with a wooden floor.
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Looks like a smaller version of the design used at O&O KCBS 2 Los Angeles.
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I said what I said!
mark1,582 posts since 27 Jun 2001
London London
A long but very enlightening - not to mention disturbing - Bloomberg Businessweek article about Sinclair Broadcasting, one of the biggest TV station groups in the US:

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2017-07-20/the-sinclair-revolution-will-be-televised-it-ll-just-have-low-production-values?utm_source=tvnewsinsider.com&utm_campaign=TVNewsInsiderLink&utm_medium=referral

I had no idea that they require their stations to run pro-Trump political commentary.

They already own stations in cities like Seattle and DC, and they're in the process of buying Tribune, which owns stations like KTLA in Los Angeles, WGN in Chicago and WPIX in New York.
Rkolsen1,384 posts since 20 Jan 2014
BBC World
A long but very enlightening - not to mention disturbing - Bloomberg Businessweek article about Sinclair Broadcasting, one of the biggest TV station groups in the US:

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2017-07-20/the-sinclair-revolution-will-be-televised-it-ll-just-have-low-production-values?utm_source=tvnewsinsider.com&utm_campaign=TVNewsInsiderLink&utm_medium=referral

I had no idea that they require their stations to run pro-Trump political commentary.

They already own stations in cities like Seattle and DC, and they're in the process of buying Tribune, which owns stations like KTLA in Los Angeles, WGN in Chicago and WPIX in New York.

Just so you know I live in their flagship / home market and the station buries their political must runs. The must runs typically air between two minute commercial breaks between their 10 & 11 pm newscasts. They make no announcement. The fake set chroma set (just a green screen) and graphics (that don't match their stations look) make it look like an law office or mortgage advertisement.

Edit : Here's a link to one of the must runs: http://behindtheheadlines.net/72017-y2k/
Last edited by Rkolsen on 20 July 2017 10:49pm
Mouseboy331,900 posts since 10 Feb 2014
I personally have always found Sinclair one of the most digusting vile operations in broadcasting today. Worse than Fox. Because they are deceptive how they do things. I feel bad for the local stations that have churn out this mandated garbage. If the Tribune deal goes through.... imagine the uproar and grumbling behind the scenes at the legacy stations like WGN KTLA and KPIX when they have to air that rubbish in very liberal large cities.

Ive had a side-eye on Sinclair for years. But I really enjoyed John Olivier's brilliant 20min take down that Hatton mentioned above.

The Daily Show has spawned several "correspondents" that have gone on to do briliant political satire programmes. LastWeekTonight with John Oliver and Full Frontal with Samantha Bee are both fantastic. Love them both.

Rant over...
Last edited by Mouseboy33 on 21 July 2017 5:13pm
I said what I said!
mark1,582 posts since 27 Jun 2001
London London
I can see why they want a foothold in markets like New York, LA and Chicago, but I can't see them being particularly welcome there. And, while WPIX isn't in great shape, they have a lot to lose when it comes to stations like KTLA and WGN.

Hopefully they'll play it safe with those stations, like Fox has done with KTVU in San Francisco.
Hatton Cross2,293 posts since 4 Jan 2003
Central (West) Midlands Today
Note to UK readers - the link to Last Week Tonight as posted (and thanks to) Mouseboy 33 - is, thanks to HBO geoblocking unavailable here..

That's except for viewers with a VPN... Wink
ITV "Occasionally it gives us something good, but for the most part, it is pathetic and puerile". Lord Taylor, House Of Commons, 1959.