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WW Update4,310 posts since 6 Feb 2007
I think that's the big problem - the broadcasters want to turn this into a personality contest like it is in the US.


But televised political debates are not just an American phenomenon. They take place in virtually all European countries, regardless of their political system. In fact, the UK was a latecomer to the game.

Of course, having a debate without a vote to go along with it is unusual.
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Cando and BM11 gave kudos
BM11543 posts since 2 Jun 2017
London London
I think that's the big problem - the broadcasters want to turn this into a personality contest like it is in the US.


But televised political debates are not just an American phenomenon. They take place in virtually all European countries, regardless of their political system. In fact, the UK was a latecomer to the game.

Of course, having a debate without a vote to go along with it is unusual.

And arranged very quickly - In Denmark in 2015 the first debate was about a day or two after the election was called.
noggin13,891 posts since 26 Jun 2001
I think that's the big problem - the broadcasters want to turn this into a personality contest like it is in the US.


But televised political debates are not just an American phenomenon. They take place in virtually all European countries, regardless of their political system. In fact, the UK was a latecomer to the game.

Of course, having a debate without a vote to go along with it is unusual.

And arranged very quickly - In Denmark in 2015 the first debate was about a day or two after the election was called.


Indeed. Though it's a lot easier in most countries where the main broadcasters usually still have studios...
1
Rkolsen gave kudos
Mr Q685 posts since 17 Apr 2003
BBC World
I think that's the big problem - the broadcasters want to turn this into a personality contest like it is in the US.


But televised political debates are not just an American phenomenon. They take place in virtually all European countries, regardless of their political system. In fact, the UK was a latecomer to the game.

Of course, having a debate without a vote to go along with it is unusual.

And arranged very quickly - In Denmark in 2015 the first debate was about a day or two after the election was called.

I think it was the same day the election was called. There's a strong culture of public discussion and debate in Denmark - and not just at election time. Just a few weeks ago, all the party leaders (of those represented in parliament) showed up for a televised debate on Europe.

But politics in Denmark is also less of a blood sport than in countries like the UK. When one compares Prime Minister Questions in the UK with its Danish equivalent, it's easy to observe a difference in tone and maturity.
1
BM11 gave kudos
BM11543 posts since 2 Jun 2017
London London
It looks like going by the schedule that only Channel 4 is doing a special program on the day of the Brexit vote (I suppose that could change) as they have an extended edition of Channel 4 news on Tuesday from 7pm-9pm.

Probably only be newsflashes on BBC and ITV if the vote happens. But if at 8.45 the Prime Minster resigns I cant see the BBC going to a newsflash then showing Mrs Wilson while such a major story happens.
Steve in Pudsey9,474 posts since 4 Jan 2003
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)

But televised political debates are not just an American phenomenon. They take place in virtually all European countries, regardless of their political system. In fact, the UK was a latecomer to the game.

Of course, having a debate without a vote to go along with it is unusual.

And arranged very quickly - In Denmark in 2015 the first debate was about a day or two after the election was called.


Indeed. Though it's a lot easier in most countries where the main broadcasters usually still have studios...


I guess the difficulty is finding a studio/venue which can accommodate an audience, which might be easiest done at short notice by bumping the planned Question Time panel and using the venue and pre-vetted (for balance) audience.

If it's just a straight debate with no/minimal audience it could probably be done in Studio B and branded as a Newsnight Debate or similar.

Or take the approach Yorkshire did whenever they were short of a studio - frame it as a discussion down the pub and do it on the Woolpack set Smile
Last edited by Steve in Pudsey on 9 December 2018 11:35am
Write that down in your copybook now.
News96573 posts since 20 Dec 2013
Look North (Yorkshire)
I still believe see the actual vote happening in time for the 10:00pm news bulletins-Regardless of normal practice, Tuesday is going a long day for the news Channels and possibly Wednesday too with the aftermath.

ETA:Channel 4 have scored an own goal there as i bet you anything the vote won't be til anywhere between 9:00 and 11:00pm.