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Inspector Sands13,692 posts since 25 Aug 2004
BBC London has always had an identity crisis since it launched. There was the LDN nonsense as part of the tri-media catastrophe,

It was a catastrophe? It's now how every newsroom works nowadays so it can't have been that bad.
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With the pisspoor local radio station having as many rebrands over the last 49 years, it gives the impression the BBC at local level in London are clueless.

I make it 5 names in 49 years, two of them the same. Not that many when you compare it with LBC.... I make it 9 just on FM



The originally planned name of course was 'London Live', tying in with the short-lived name forthe radio station from 2000-01.

Wasn't there even a version of the generic regional titles with the flying maps produced for London Live that, obviously, was never used? I recall it popping up on here at one point.

Yes, it was produced at the same time as the other regional news titles in 2000, but then by the time the relaunch happened the name was changed and the superior BBC London titles were created instead.


Semi-interesting fact - the person who was in head of BBC London when London Live launched; Jane Mote, was also launch director of the channel called London Live
Last edited by Inspector Sands on 16 July 2019 10:56pm - 4 times in total
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Joe6,532 posts since 9 Oct 2005
Meridian (South) South Today
I think some people fail to comprehend the difficulty in getting consistent graphics across so many different pieces of equipment. I work on motion and static graphics regularly and trying to create convincing solutions for different software is hard enough, let alone different pieces of hardware of different ages in different parts of the country. (I would imagine) you cannot simply ‘load on’ graphics from somewhere else. I think that this becomes clear as soon as you do anything remotely similar.
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deejay2,898 posts since 5 Jan 2003
Central (South) Oxford
I think some people fail to comprehend the difficulty in getting consistent graphics across so many different pieces of equipment. I work on motion and static graphics regularly and trying to create convincing solutions for different software is hard enough, let alone different pieces of hardware of different ages in different parts of the country. (I would imagine) you cannot simply ‘load on’ graphics from somewhere else. I think that this becomes clear as soon as you do anything remotely similar.


Absolutely. Add in to that the issue of it all being designed and delivered in HD to regional centres who are (largely) still SD. The difficulty in precisely aligning things like the breakfast clock (let alone getting the font right) is not to be underestimated. Last time breakfast changed their clock I seem to remember it was arranged for an all-centres video feed one morning from Salford with just the keyed clock on the output so that each region could tinker until they were all satisfied.
Two minutes regions...
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Jamesypoo1,442 posts since 3 Apr 2005
Anglia (East) Look East
From a layman's point of view I appreciate the difficulty in getting all the various hardware and software systems to be (somewhat) cohesive and similar looking when they get to air, but it does strike me as inefficient to still be running in such a manner in 2019.

I know there have been various upgrades of differing degrees across the regional centres, but ITV managed to roll out graphics kit (I think Vizrt) in 2004-2006 and when they rebrand/update graphics they are able to roll it out (seemingly) easily and consistently across the estate.

The criticism here isn't for those on the front line trying to implement things and ask the impossible of this ageing kit, but of the beancounters or whoever is making the call to stick with this stuff and not bite the bullet and upgrade at least the gfx kit. I'm sure if you were to add up the time spent trying to reproduce the same look across different kit vs investing in something consistent to allow templates etc to easily be rolled out.
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deejay2,898 posts since 5 Jan 2003
Central (South) Oxford
ITV did reduce the number of studio centres significantly however, closing many historic sites and reducing the number of opt outs. While a few have resurfaced they are often recorded in other new facilities which they share with other opts.
The BBC hasn’t chosen to go down that route (though there was a plan at one point to share the BBC studios with ITV regions). The BBC still operate separate studio sites for each region it makes output for and it’s all live. The BBC has been looking at a long term plan to re-equip regions but wants to do it in as long-term and future proof way it can in order to deliver the best value. However the down side is that regional centres are making do with SD kit and infrastructure and increasingly ancient equipment.
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trevormon5 posts since 18 Sep 2018
London London
The BBC has been looking at a long term plan to re-equip regions but wants to do it in as long-term and future proof way it can in order to deliver the best value. However the down side is that regional centres are making do with SD kit and infrastructure and increasingly ancient equipment.


The trouble is that until all the BBC regions can actually get access to an HD transmission service the studio kit might as well stay SD. BBC London does have newish kit and is produced in HD from location material to studio output but doesn't get to the viewers in HD because there isn't the money to provide multiple HD opt outs for all the regions.

Ironically the first update to kit for regions is likely to be location cameras which will probably be 4K capable but end up being transmitted in SD, despite the BBC having had some kind of HD service since 2006.
mdtauk6,299 posts since 4 Jan 2003
London London
From a layman's point of view I appreciate the difficulty in getting all the various hardware and software systems to be (somewhat) cohesive and similar looking when they get to air, but it does strike me as inefficient to still be running in such a manner in 2019.

I know there have been various upgrades of differing degrees across the regional centres, but ITV managed to roll out graphics kit (I think Vizrt) in 2004-2006 and when they rebrand/update graphics they are able to roll it out (seemingly) easily and consistently across the estate.

The criticism here isn't for those on the front line trying to implement things and ask the impossible of this ageing kit, but of the beancounters or whoever is making the call to stick with this stuff and not bite the bullet and upgrade at least the gfx kit. I'm sure if you were to add up the time spent trying to reproduce the same look across different kit vs investing in something consistent to allow templates etc to easily be rolled out.

Equipment upgrades would be welcome, but there are staff that will need re-training, and possibly other local newsroom staff, which would need to adapt their workflows.

HD would be a good reason to move all of this forward, and if the SD satellite channels were to move to HD (with some kind of downscaling on the STB to avoid needing SD and HD channels) - it would require the retirement of all the Chyron and Quantel kits etc across all newsrooms - as well as digital ingestion, and new cameras.
London Lite10,475 posts since 4 Jan 2003
London London
The BBC has been looking at a long term plan to re-equip regions but wants to do it in as long-term and future proof way it can in order to deliver the best value. However the down side is that regional centres are making do with SD kit and infrastructure and increasingly ancient equipment.


BBC London does have newish kit and is produced in HD from location material to studio output but doesn't get to the viewers in HD because there isn't the money to provide multiple HD opt outs for all the regions.


Except for the 0627 bulletin on the NC during Breakfast.
Jamesypoo1,442 posts since 3 Apr 2005
Anglia (East) Look East
ITV did reduce the number of studio centres significantly however, closing many historic sites and reducing the number of opt outs. While a few have resurfaced they are often recorded in other new facilities which they share with other opts.
The BBC hasn’t chosen to go down that route (though there was a plan at one point to share the BBC studios with ITV regions). The BBC still operate separate studio sites for each region it makes output for and it’s all live. The BBC has been looking at a long term plan to re-equip regions but wants to do it in as long-term and future proof way it can in order to deliver the best value. However the down side is that regional centres are making do with SD kit and infrastructure and increasingly ancient equipment.

I know it's a bit like comparing chalk and cheese but I was talking about 2004-2006 when the blue and silver animating graphics were seen across much of the UK and by the time of the 2006 corporate rebrand ISTR pretty much everywhere except Plymouth had them?

At this time I don't think prerecords had become a thing and you still had 3 x Central programmes, 3 x Meridian programmes, 2 x Anglia programmes, 2 x Yorkshire programmes, TT & Border were separate so still a fairly hefty amount of programmes.

I know there is a long term plan (still) being worked on for BBC regions looking at lots of different options, but I would argue that regions "making do" for such long periods of time is far from efficient.
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