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lxflyer446 posts since 25 Jul 2013
UTV Newsline


Has it ? You mean The Gulf War Version 1, where there was 'Scud FM' using R4's FM network, the precursor to Radio 5 Mk 2, (what we have today)
I was more thinking about the BBC World Service which launched in 1932.


BBC World Service radio, has never been a rolling news station, at least not in the last three or four decades, it has on the hour news bulletins, but so does Radio 2, Capital, Heart FM, etc etc. That doesn't make them rolling news stations, any more than World Service Radio


You clearly don't listen to it very often.

Yes there are hourly bulletins, and there are also half-hourly headlines.

There is Newsday which is broadcast from 03:00 to 08:30 every day, World Update from 10:00 to 11:00, Outside Source from 11:00 to 12:00, and Newshour at both 14:00 and 21:00. Throw in five 30 minute editions of the Newsroom between 17:00 and 00:30.

That to me is not far off a rolling news service, given those programmes alone count for 12 hours of broadcasting.
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Inspector Sands13,762 posts since 25 Aug 2004
The World Service has got more newsy over the last decade or so, the days of music programmes and episodes of Just a Minute are long gone. My understanding is that they re-organised the English language services a few years ago creating a service of just news programmes and another with short bulletins at the top of the hour and feature programming. The idea being that the mix between the two changed according to the time of day in a particular region. So for example in the European morning it would take the news service but the Americas would get the more featurey one in the middle of their night. Then outside peak Europe would get more features and then the Americas would switch to news for their morning
Markymark6,957 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today


Has it ? You mean The Gulf War Version 1, where there was 'Scud FM' using R4's FM network, the precursor to Radio 5 Mk 2, (what we have today)
I was more thinking about the BBC World Service which launched in 1932.


BBC World Service radio, has never been a rolling news station, at least not in the last three or four decades, it has on the hour news bulletins, but so does Radio 2, Capital, Heart FM, etc etc. That doesn't make them rolling news stations, any more than World Service Radio


You clearly don't listen to it very often.

Yes there are hourly bulletins, and there are also half-hourly headlines.

There is Newsday which is broadcast from 03:00 to 08:30 every day, World Update from 10:00 to 11:00, Outside Source from 11:00 to 12:00, and Newshour at both 14:00 and 21:00. Throw in five 30 minute editions of the Newsroom between 17:00 and 00:30.

That to me is not far off a rolling news service, given those programmes alone count for 12 hours of broadcasting.


Ok, fair point, no I've not listened in recent years, and checking the schedules just now, yes, it is very 'newsy' these days. Certainly wasn't when I used to listen to it while abroad ( these days I simply listen to UK radio via the internet of course, rather than struggle holding a SW radio against the hotel room window !)
watchingtv2,271 posts since 6 Mar 2010
Anglia (East) Look East
I have just received the new update to youview. It now has a BBC News App, assumingly top stories VT's automatically linked to creaste what feels a is nearly a news channel of the future. The app even started with a sting.
My contribution is small but you are welcome.
noggin14,438 posts since 26 Jun 2001
I have just received the new update to youview. It now has a BBC News App, assumingly top stories VT's automatically linked to creaste what feels a is nearly a news channel of the future. The app even started with a sting.


Sounds like the Smart TV and NowTV app - linked video clips (which you can skip through) with overlaid locally rendered graphics that you can expand or contract?

Great replacement for the Red Button news loop the BBC used to offer, but not a replacement for a breaking news service.
radiolistener679 posts since 8 Aug 2010


Has it ? You mean The Gulf War Version 1, where there was 'Scud FM' using R4's FM network, the precursor to Radio 5 Mk 2, (what we have today)
I was more thinking about the BBC World Service which launched in 1932.


BBC World Service radio, has never been a rolling news station, at least not in the last three or four decades, it has on the hour news bulletins, but so does Radio 2, Capital, Heart FM, etc etc. That doesn't make them rolling news stations, any more than World Service Radio


You clearly don't listen to it very often.

Yes there are hourly bulletins, and there are also half-hourly headlines.

There is Newsday which is broadcast from 03:00 to 08:30 every day, World Update from 10:00 to 11:00, Outside Source from 11:00 to 12:00, and Newshour at both 14:00 and 21:00. Throw in five 30 minute editions of the Newsroom between 17:00 and 00:30.

That to me is not far off a rolling news service, given those programmes alone count for 12 hours of broadcasting.


Every time I've listened to the World Service there was some lousy, boring documentary about someone moaning in Africa. I found the output utterly patronising.
Brekkie31,796 posts since 4 Jan 2003 Banned for 1 week
HTV Wales Wales Today
I have just received the new update to youview. It now has a BBC News App, assumingly top stories VT's automatically linked to create what feels a is nearly a news channel of the future. The app even started with a sting.

That's been available for years - and certainly been on the Youview box I've had a few months both as an app and via the connected red button. As I've said before it does it's job but does feel somewhat unloved compared to the BBC Sport app. A more user friendly interface and adding live streaming of events such as press conferences wouldn't be too big a step for it, but those live events would still need presenters to guide you through them IMO and put them into context, and also certainly when it comes to political speeches broadcast in such a way that they don't go unchallenged.
I preferred the internet when it had a sense of humour.
noggin14,438 posts since 26 Jun 2001
I have just received the new update to youview. It now has a BBC News App, assumingly top stories VT's automatically linked to create what feels a is nearly a news channel of the future. The app even started with a sting.

That's been available for years - and certainly been on the Youview box I've had a few months both as an app and via the connected red button. As I've said before it does it's job but does feel somewhat unloved compared to the BBC Sport app. A more user friendly interface and adding live streaming of events such as press conferences wouldn't be too big a step for it, but those live events would still need presenters to guide you through them IMO and put them into context, and also certainly when it comes to political speeches broadcast in such a way that they don't go unchallenged.


Big issue with live event streaming is compliance. Someone would have to watch it continuously. Which would cost money.
DTV1,182 posts since 27 Feb 2012
Meridian (South) South Today
but those live events would still need presenters to guide you through them IMO and put them into context, and also certainly when it comes to political speeches broadcast in such a way that they don't go unchallenged.


I think there's a solution here, don't get rid of the News Channel. I know rationalism is a novel concept for BBC executives, but it's occasions like those you've outlined that the News Channel is great for - along with providing an in depth rolling news service for most of the day (although there are some blocks of programming between 09:15 and 11:00 that they could do with out). The BBC News Channel is the second most cost effective (viewer:budget ratio) BBC domestic channel and that rises to most cost effective if you take newsgathering costs, that would happen anyway, out. The running cost of the BBC News Channel is just over that of the services the BBC could cut without a major dent in any remit (i.e. the three extra radio services). You'd still need a presenting and gallery team on standby in case of a piece of major domestic news, you'd still be using all the newsgathering resources and closing the News Channel is as good as surrendering to Murdoch - Sky News is really the only area where Sky and the BBC have any real competition - in Sport Sky beat the BBC and everywhere else the BBC is ahead - but the BBC are still ahead of Sky in nearly every area - trust, impartiality perception, viewership, quality etc. so to quit while your ahead is one of the most ridiculous things the BBC could possibly do.
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