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BBI45816 posts since 2 Aug 2015
Central (East) East Midlands Today
Louise has done quite a few Sunday shows.

It’s a programme not a show

See the clip of Huw Edwards on the occasion when a power cut took the Six of air, he referred to the Six as "the show". If that is, then Breakfast certainly would be.

If you look at en.oxforddictionaries.com, A 'Show' can be defined as ' A light entertainment programme on television or radio ', whilst a 'Programme' can be defined as ' A presentation or item on television or radio, especially one broadcast regularly between stated times '.

However, on the thesaurus section of the same website, synonyms of a 'Programme' can include, but are not limited to: broadcast, production, show , presentation, transmission, performance, telecast, simulcast, videocast, podcast .

Either way, this seems to be a slightly silly debate, especially considering that the term a person uses to refer to a show/programme, can also vary on the person's idiolect.
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Inspector Sands13,599 posts since 25 Aug 2004
I've never liked 'radio show' as a term. It's non visual, there's nothing being shown

I would suggest that the use of "Programme" to refer to the entire output of a station - eg BBC Light Programme, Third Programme - is missing from that definition, which makes the authority of the rest of it debatable Smile

I suppose that derives from a programme of events, like a theatre programme
Rkolsen2,722 posts since 20 Jan 2014
BBC World
I would suggest that the use of "Programme" to refer to the entire output of a station - eg BBC Light Programme, Third Programme - is missing from that definition, which makes the authority of the rest of it debatable Smile


You could use Show to refer to a specific episode while program to refer to the entire series (every show - not in the UK sense).
Don’t let anyone treat you like you’re a VO/SOT when you’re a PKG.
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