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deejay2,778 posts since 5 Jan 2003
Central (South) Oxford
In any case the story selection and writing style was quite different to normal operations, so it did take a decent amount of time to put together from the newsroom side.


Really ?! 30 seconds worth of colloquial copy ! ?

If so, it's no wonder the regions can't cope with 'breaking news' !


Well excuse me.

The style for this update was very prescriptive. It was designed to reach an audience that didn’t normally engage with any other BBC news output, so couldn’t therefore be a simple cut and paste from the 1800 headlines. The guidelines were two stories, both of regional significance and with good pictures, but not necessarily the 1830 lead. (1830 may have led for example on a rather dry ongoing court case - right for the 1830, wrong for the 2000). Then a regional weather forecast. It was far more ‘Newsbeat’ in writing style than classic regional news, and therefore required thought.

It’s far harder to write good 10” copy that tells the whole story than a standard 25” package intro.

And when I’ve worked in a region dealing with breaking local news, everyone in me experience has risen to the challenge. It doesn’t happen often, especially during an opt, but when it does, ive always felt it was dealt with professionally.
Two minutes regions...
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Markymark5,896 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
In any case the story selection and writing style was quite different to normal operations, so it did take a decent amount of time to put together from the newsroom side.


Really ?! 30 seconds worth of colloquial copy ! ?

If so, it's no wonder the regions can't cope with 'breaking news' !


Well excuse me.

The style for this update was very prescriptive. It was designed to reach an audience that didn’t normally engage with any other BBC news output, so couldn’t therefore be a simple cut and paste from the 1800 headlines. The guidelines were two stories, both of regional significance and with good pictures, but not necessarily the 1830 lead. (1830 may have led for example on a rather dry ongoing court case - right for the 1830, wrong for the 2000). Then a regional weather forecast. It was far more ‘Newsbeat’ in writing style than classic regional news, and therefore required thought.

It’s far harder to write good 10” copy that tells the whole story than a standard 25” package intro.

And when I’ve worked in a region dealing with breaking local news, everyone in me experience has risen to the challenge. It doesn’t happen often, especially during an opt, but when it does, ive always felt it was dealt with professionally.


I take on board what you say, and clearly you have first hand experience of being close to the process, but surely being able to summarise something complex and/or dull for a different audience or readership is a basic journalistic requirement ? I can remember having to rewrite broadsheet articles in tabloid style in English classes at secondary school
Brekkie30,005 posts since 4 Jan 2003 Recently warned
HTV Wales Wales Today
It's probably a more common skill in newsrooms than it was 10 years ago, distilling stories down to 140 characters for Twitter is bread and butter for most journalists nowadays.

Well, distilling a story down to a misleading 140 characters purely for clickbait seems to be the skill most "journalists" use now.
Shouldn't that have been posted in the "John Logie Baird has Invented Television" thread?
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Alex Plain-Later (previously Austin Tatious) 913 posts since 1 Jan 2016
HTV West Points West
I have always assumed that when the BBC wanted to rename Inside Ulster with a non-geographic brand, they arrived at the non-word that is "Newsline" simply by (almost) ripping-off UTV's former* "Newstime" brand (*I think/assume that UTV had already ditched the "Newstime" name before BBC Newsline ever came along?).

NewsLINE also sounds like it should be the name of their newsroom phone number (for viewers to call if they have a story), rather than the name of the actual TV news bulletins.

But how did UTV themselves ever arrive at such a mind-bogglingly twee sounding (and non-word) name to begin with?! Despite having the word "news" within it, "Newstime" somehow sounds decidedly un-newsy (or at least not serious and/or grown-up news, more like dumbed-down news aimed at either idiots or children. Or both).

It is only beaten by ITV Border's long-standing "Lookaround" brand (yet another non-word!) for inexplicable twee-ness.

Utterly bizarre. Confused
I is well eloquent, innit.
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