« Topics
1234...141516
rdd3,503 posts since 21 Jun 2001
Claire Byrne Live, though announced as such and billed as such in listings, went out with the Election 2020 titles and graphics in use and from the election set. Claire Byrne still presenting, but accompanied by David McCullagh.
bkman19901,530 posts since 29 Jan 2012
UTV Newsline
RTÉ One & RTÉ News Now will broadcast the 1st 2 full sessions of the 33rd Dail in full from tomorrow.

The 1st televised session will begin at 11:30am until 12:40pm presented by Catriona Perry.

The 2nd session of the 33rd Dail will begin at 4:00pm until 5:40pm presented by Sharon Ni Bheoláin.
Last edited by bkman1990 on 20 February 2020 4:37pm - 2 times in total
JKDerry2,457 posts since 15 Oct 2016
UTV Newsline
RTÉ One & RTÉ News Now will broadcast the 1st 2 full sessions of the 33rd Dail in full from tomorrow.

The 1st televised session will begin at 11:30am until 12:40pm presented by Catriona Perry.

The 2nd session of the 33rd Dail will begin at 2:30pm until 5:40pm presented by Sharon Ni Bheoláin.

Both sessions no doubt will achieve nothing of news, as we can bet the Dail will come to a grinding halt over nomination of Taoiseach and formation of a government right?
bkman19901,530 posts since 29 Jan 2012
UTV Newsline
There is not much change on RTÉ's presentation today. The only bit of it that is different today is the song used for the titles.

RTÉ's titles is from the U2 single 'Walk On'. It's the song written for Au San Suu Kyi when she was under house arrest in Burma.
JKDerry2,457 posts since 15 Oct 2016
UTV Newsline
What a waste of time this is for RTE News - we all know there will not be a Taoiseach nominated properly and certainly no government has been formed.

This Irish system seems truly weird to me, that the lower house has to nominate the Taoiseach of the day, whereas here in the UK< the leader of the largest party, usually with a majority is appointed Prime Minister by the Queen as they can control a majority in the Commons - why doesn't Ireland do this?

The President appoints the Taoiseach who can command a majority in the Dail, either by majority government, coalition or a confidence/supply agreement?
trance43 posts since 2 May 2019
What a waste of time this is for RTE News - we all know there will not be a Taoiseach nominated properly and certainly no government has been formed.

This Irish system seems truly weird to me, that the lower house has to nominate the Taoiseach of the day, whereas here in the UK< the leader of the largest party, usually with a majority is appointed Prime Minister by the Queen as they can control a majority in the Commons - why doesn't Ireland do this?

The President appoints the Taoiseach who can command a majority in the Dail, either by majority government, coalition or a confidence/supply agreement?


Not directly pres related, but indirectly I suppose since the procedure of the political developments is highly covered by the media in both countries:

The Irish system isn't totally different to the UK's. In 2010, Labour wasn't the largest party, it still had the possibility of forming a government and was involved in talks until the Con/Lib Dem coalition was confirmed. It was only after several days of coalition talks that Brown went to the Queen to resign and Cameron went to the Queen.

More on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2010_United_Kingdom_government_formation

The principle is essentially the same between two systems: in the UK the 'would be' PM informs the queen that they believe they have the confidence of the lower house, and so is appointed, and then must maintain that confidence of the house to remain in power (by not losing votes), whereas in Ireland, the 'would be' Taoiseach has confidence by direct vote of the lower house and then travels to the President.

Of course, the PM just exists by convention, whereas the Taoiseach has a role enshrined in the Irish constitution.

Either way, under both systems all the negotiations, votes and trips to heads of state are televised and reported on, just in a different order.
Brekkie33,948 posts since 4 Jan 2003
HTV Wales Wales Today
Lets face it - there was a little bit of interest, probably due to Brexit, in the Irish elections when they happened. When we found out we wouldn't get a result there and then both the media and most the general public moved on. Ultimately when a government is finally formed and a Taoiseach elected it'll probably be a footnote in the "other news" round up towards the end of the bulletin.
Stay Home. Protect the NHS. Save Lives.
cityprod2,073 posts since 3 Oct 2005
Westcountry Spotlight
Lets face it - there was a little bit of interest, probably due to Brexit, in the Irish elections when they happened. When we found out we wouldn't get a result there and then both the media and most the general public moved on. Ultimately when a government is finally formed and a Taoiseach elected it'll probably be a footnote in the "other news" round up towards the end of the bulletin.


And I'm afraid that's a sad indictment of our media's general attitude to stories that don't happen in the UK. This is potentially one of the most fascinating stories in Europe right now, and it merits little more than a footnote in a news roundup section of a bulletin. It's the first major general election and potential change of government since Brexit Day, and it probably deserves more than a "footnote".
4
TedJrr, AJB39 and 2 others
  • London Lite
  • Brekkie
gave kudos
BFGArmy633 posts since 15 Jan 2018
London London
Lets face it - there was a little bit of interest, probably due to Brexit, in the Irish elections when they happened. When we found out we wouldn't get a result there and then both the media and most the general public moved on. Ultimately when a government is finally formed and a Taoiseach elected it'll probably be a footnote in the "other news" round up towards the end of the bulletin.


And I'm afraid that's a sad indictment of our media's general attitude to stories that don't happen in the UK. This is potentially one of the most fascinating stories in Europe right now, and it merits little more than a footnote in a news roundup section of a bulletin. It's the first major general election and potential change of government since Brexit Day, and it probably deserves more than a "footnote".


Indeed while they're hardly alone in this, the BBC websites has had little to no mention of the Irish election fallout but at the moment has such big topics in its main news headlines as 'Inaccessible first floor property sells for £1' and 'Officers help deliver baby on lunch break'.
As I say though they're not alone in that - even watching CNN on an irregular basis, I'd happily never hear the words 'Diamond Princess' again. They're blimming obsessed with that ship.

I find these days Al Jazeera is my go-to if I actually want a proper international bulletin - they're not always perfect but you get much more of a global overview with them and much more breadth of stories.
2
TedJrr and cityprod gave kudos
peterh304 posts since 6 May 2012
Central (East) East Midlands Today
Technically as no formal single uk constitution exists, the role of prime minister is enshrined in the various acts and laws etc that act to form a constitution - do Irish tv follow the taosich to the president like the uk channels follows the pm to the queen after the election is resulted
TVLand185 posts since 9 Aug 2019
UTV Newsline
Leo Varadkar has officially resigned. He will, however, remain as “Care-taker Taoiseach” until a new government has been formed and a new Taoiseach elected.