The Gallery

A Red and Cream Tribute - BBC News 2000

Inspired by Bail's efforts, and of course the original designs...

MD
mdtauk London London
Pete posted:
chris posted:
Fascinating stuff. Which title sequence is she referring to with the sparkles off water and a globe full of glitter?


it's a bit clearer when you read the original thread on twitter. she's talking about the breakfast titles both with the fireworks and water / glitter.

fascinating although makes perfect sense that there are so many physical elements as part of the construction of the titles but you forget how long ago this actually was. it shows how incredibly ahead of their time in terms of design they were.

one thing that's not been cleared up yet however is... is the countdown meant to be sharp or blurry?

I could have asked SOOOO many more questions, but at some point you have to stop bothering a person Razz

I think someone saw my Twitch video, and that is how she came to find me on Twitter. But I am so thankful she was willing to answer my questions.
PE
Pete Founding member North Reporting Scotland
I could have asked SOOOO many more questions, but at some point you have to stop bothering a person Razz.


oh absolutely. it's totally highlighted how little info we have about the production of them compared to what would be available if they were made today
ELM 2011: I am sick of been persicuted by you immature TV Forumers!
MD
mdtauk London London
Pete posted:
I could have asked SOOOO many more questions, but at some point you have to stop bothering a person Razz.


oh absolutely. it's totally highlighted how little info we have about the production of them compared to what would be available if they were made today

I know Martin Lambie-Nairn has a few books out there where his work is covered, but not the BBC News designs, and not in the kind of details about the process of them being made.

I had made the assumptions about filmed elements, partly because of my belief that the digital tools at the time would not have been able to do the depth of field and fidelity the titles have - and because a lot of Lambie-Nairn's work was about compositing filmed elements.

Now, Flame is still around, currently owned by Autodesk, but it would have been Discreet Flame back then, and it would have used SGI workstations (like the N64 development hardware) which also had software used in the Advertising and TV Production sectors.

I watched a video about one such package called Paintbox
AndrewPSSP and DeMarkay gave kudos
BA
bilky asko Tyne Tees Look North (North East)
It's interesting to know that the suspicions you and Bail had were right about there being filmed elements.

In the unlikely event someone acquires a working Paintbox, here's the official training video from 1994:


Avatar Credit: © Independent Television News. Avatar Subject: Jonathan George Snow HonFRIBA

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