Requests

Copyright free

Tv tunes (December 2019)

This site closed in March 2021 and is now a read-only archive
16
16ratnettfi
Hello. I was wondering. If I had a TV theme tune, how could I make it sound different so it's copyright free and my own.
NJ
Neil Jones Founding member
https://www.gov.uk/copyright posted:
You get copyright protection automatically - you don’t have to apply or pay a fee. There isn’t a register of copyright works in the UK.

You automatically get copyright protection when you create:

original literary, dramatic, musical and artistic work, including illustration and photography
original non-literary written work, such as software, web content and databases
sound and music recordings
film and television recordings
broadcasts
the layout of published editions of written, dramatic and musical works


All of this being said, you can publish it the Creative Commons route - https://creativecommons.org/about/program-areas/arts-culture/arts-culture-resources/legalmusicforvideos/ - you'd basically give up the copyright and anybody can use it.

As to "how you make it sound different", that depends if you're using an existing source.
You can sometimes sail really close to the wind on the sound-alike stakes - I suppose it comes down to whether one could misinterpret your creation as the original recording, so if you write a song that sounds remarkably similar to Yellow Submarine both in music, sound - basically if you played them side by side and it was hard to tell them apart, that may be an issue. Otherwise, YMMV.
16
16ratnettfi
Great, thank you. Here is an example of 4 theme tunes that have been recreated by other people. So they must own their version. Im wondering how i could do something similar.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4RY0iO-mVzc
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yfp-5zs-Fqo
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9vIr5WE3agM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ZB93Gmfqss
NJ
Neil Jones Founding member
I'm going to argue those are derivatives and/or "sound alikes" or at an absolute stretch covers. I mean you recognise it as EastEnders, even though it sounds horrible.

K-Tel records are good examples of this when they release compilation albums with the key phrase "re-recorded with one or more members of the original band", and those tracks are reproductions. I'll be honest, I'm not entirely sure how the K-Tel model works but I think they get the new recording as an "asset" that they can flog.

I got the impression from your post you were looking at something original.
16
16ratnettfi
So how easy would it be to create something like that on Audacity?
NJ
Neil Jones Founding member
So how easy would it be to create something like that on Audacity?


You're not going to be creating any music with Audacity, it's an audio file editing program. You can make MP3 files with it, it doesn't create music on its own.

Since I suspect I can guess where this thread's going to go, the next question is going to be: Without Googling, do you know anything whatsoever about making music? Music scales? Notes? Music keys? Can you read sheet music? Without googling, do you know what the difference is between the white keys on a piano or keyboard and the black keys and what happens when you press keys on the far right and far left as you sit at these instruments? Can you string a composition together?

If you answered no to any/most of these questions, then I think you have a lot of learning to do beforehand. There are programs and methods online that you can use to "make" music but you need some theory behind it first, otherwise you generate some monstrosity that makes a yowling cat sound pleasant.

Note: "knowing anything about music" does not involve actively listening to any current Top 40 single.
DO
dosxuk
If the question is actually "can I take someone else's work, edit it a bit in audacity (e.g. speed it up, trim it a bit, add noise), and then claim it's my song and not subject to copyright any more" the answer is simply "No".

Newer posts