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MetalGearRex1,299 posts since 11 May 2016
London London
And here's a channel hop from the night it closed down. A quick flick through the channels before settling on a report on the closure from News 24. Those straps were ugly weren't they, is that Gill Sans Ultra Bold? Anyway, easy to forget just how much people thought digital switchover would be set back by ITV Digital closing, with David Elstein suggesting it shouldn't happen for another twenty years.
It got accelerated instead, because ITV Digital's demise allowed Freeview to take it's place. I guess Elstein expected a replacement subscription service to appear instead?

Yep. To be fair, all of the rumours at the time seemed to point to a future subscription service - Sky was rumoured to be starting a DTT alternative to their successful digital satellite service, but they decided to join up with the BBC and Crown Castle to create Freeview.

Elstein was proved wrong within a few years - most Freeview boxes were cheap as chips (some were as low as £20), and the takeup of those using Freeview became so quick, that DSO proved to be possible for a 2008 - 2012 timeframe.
"Winner Winner Chicken Dinner" - PUBG
VMPhil8,050 posts since 31 Mar 2005
Granada North West Today
To be fair to Elstein, he may also have been worried about the damage to people's perception of digital TV as a whole that the ITV Digital collapse could bring about.

Remember also that later in 2002 there was the threat of customers having to pay for or return their boxes - and a lot of people may have decided they were satisifed with the five channels on analogue and just returned to that instead of getting a dish installed or installing cable.

A Transdiffusion article from the time lays out the case for this:

Quote:

Between them Carlton and Granada paid up £2.8m for the million or so set top boxes and promptly gave them to the people with whom they had resided.

On the outset it may look like a nice gesture to make for not very much money, but goodwill hasn’t played that big a part in the ITV Digital saga and it wasn’t about to start now.

Both Carlton and Granada had good reasons for stumping up the cash and both involve the former subscribers.

After the closure of ITV Digital, over a million people were suddenly left without pay-TV. It’s estimated that at least 300,000 of those moved over to satellite or cable, although there are no exact figures.

However that left at least half a million people who didn’t bother and just stuck with the free-to-air channels that remained. However, with the launch of Freeview, many people may have taken the opportunity to assess what they watch and decide whether it would be worth the outlay for a new DTT adapter. Those that didn’t would have gone straight back to analogue.

In recent times ITV2 has made a bit of a mark for itself, building itself up to be the 6th biggest channel on DTT, behind the main five channels.

The potential decrease of tens, possibly hundreds of thousands of viewers could have dented its ratings and, more importantly, the amount of revenue it would have been able to raise by advertising and sponsorship.

Whether this risk was enough to warrant the spending of nearly £3m pounds, who knows? However, that was not the only concern.

Each ITV company pays a set amount to the Treasury each year for its license to broadcast. In recent years the government has offered the companies a reduction in these fees, depending on how many homes went digital. The so-called “digital dividend” saved Carlton and Granada £84m between them in the year to September 2002.

Any reduction in the number of digital homes would have seen the digital dividend decrease. At the time of its closure, ITV Digital accounted for around 14% of all digital homes, contributing around £11.8m to the digital dividend.

The reduction would have depended on how many homes gave up on digital. If around 250,000 households went back to analogue, it would cost the two companies £2.9m a year.

Obviously, no one knows how many people would have turned their backs on digital, but the chance to pay a few million (a small amount to both companies) to safeguard future rebates for a few years was obviously an attractive option.

And so Carlton and Granada can protect their balance sheets and former subscribers get to keep on watching digital television.
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VMPhil8,050 posts since 31 Mar 2005
Granada North West Today
Here's something I found on Vimeo whilst watching the 1997 Perfect Day video. A behind the scenes of the attempt in 2000 to record the song live with musicians around the country, as part of the BBC's Music Live festival. It has burned in English subtitles, so may have been produced for international broadcast?

Warning: contains Rolf Harris.

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FanOfTV9965 posts since 6 Nov 2017 new member
Granada North West Today
Here's something I found on Vimeo whilst watching the 1997 Perfect Day video. A behind the scenes of the attempt in 2000 to record the song live with musicians around the country, as part of the BBC's Music Live festival. It has burned in English subtitles, so may have been produced for international broadcast?

Warning: contains Rolf Harris.

https://vimeo.com/121355369


I Wonder if anyone (Other than JB1601) has captured anything from BBC Music Live.
The next programe is Pointless... It's the Jeremy Kyle show.
VMPhil8,050 posts since 31 Mar 2005
Granada North West Today
Harry Enfield's Brand Spanking New Show, the programme he made in 2000 for Sky One.

Steve Williams has posted previously that this was intended for Sky Premier which was initially supposed to be a 'British HBO' but the plan was scrapped, so shows like this went out on Sky One instead.



Harry Enfield in 2010 posted:
"I didn't think anybody would see it because it was on Sky. I've seen a bit of it recently, and it's got some really good characters in it, but they're all over the top, because I didn't have time to learn it. So I'm panicking trying to learn the words. I'm loud and shouty, and it's just painful."

Did he allow it to go out like that because it was for Sky? "Yeah. Yeah, definitely." And if it had been for the BBC? "I wouldn't have accepted the series. At the time I was just interested in editing Kevin and Perry, so I was not there in my head."


https://www.theguardian.com/theguardian/2010/sep/25/harry-enfield-interview
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Si-Co1,661 posts since 2 Oct 2003
Tyne Tees Look North (North East)
Philip Schofield shows viewers around the presentation area in 1985.

Was CBBC always presented from the BBC1 continuity booth in that era? I’m sure I remember Philip once saying something like “BBC1 is over there, BBC2 is over there, and we are in a sort of broom cupboard in between them” (a name which I assume stuck). Was this just “dramatic licence”?

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