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VMPhil8,277 posts since 31 Mar 2005
Granada North West Today
Did anybody ever find out what News 24 was showing prior to that announcement?

It didn't exist yet. Went on the air three months later.

I think Larry was referring to the news of the Queen Mother?

Although it's also interesting to wonder how News 24, instead of World, would have covered the Diana story. Would they have been as capable? How serious would the news have to be for them to put their jackets back on? (I'm only half-joking)
madmusician777 posts since 2 Jun 2006
Anglia (East) Look East
Within Roger Mosey's new book, he discusses briefly his experience in putting the 5 Live coverage together. He says that they were caught out somewhat by it being a Bank Holiday weekend and that there were rotas with some presenters having one week off, others the following week off, but with both sets being off over the middle weekend (which this was). Apparently one un-named presenter came in from a dinner party, but had consumed so much wine that they were plainly unfit to go on the air, so they were sent back home in a taxi! They got through to Eddie Mair on his mobile phone, but he was abroad.

There was a wonderful article that appeared on one of these threads with real behind-the-scenes detail of how the print and broadcast media dealt with it. I can't track it down now (and it wasn't linked from that 2007 thread, perhaps there was a 2012 thread that had the story in?). It included wonderful anecdotes like a harassed producer at the BBC thrusting a printer at a man who he had never seen before (and assumed was a new junior member of staff), telling him "just make this work for me, please". It turned out to be a very senior figure in the news operation, who was reasonably new to the role. There was also a story about two sub-editors from the Telegraph who got the front page of the paper changed after they couldn't track down anybody else senior to make the decision.

In many ways, this particular news story is once-in-a-lifetime because it came just at the advent of the internet and our current method of communication. You wouldn't have problems tracking down journalists in the office now, nor would putting rolling news on BBC One be such a big deal. But in 1997, it was a foretaste to the rolling news coverage of the future, with a bit of the old austere BBC mixed in with it.
VMPhil8,277 posts since 31 Mar 2005
Granada North West Today
There was a wonderful article that appeared on one of these threads with real behind-the-scenes detail of how the print and broadcast media dealt with it. I can't track it down now (and it wasn't linked from that 2007 thread, perhaps there was a 2012 thread that had the story in?). It included wonderful anecdotes like a harassed producer at the BBC thrusting a printer at a man who he had never seen before (and assumed was a new junior member of staff), telling him "just make this work for me, please". It turned out to be a very senior figure in the news operation, who was reasonably new to the role. There was also a story about two sub-editors from the Telegraph who got the front page of the paper changed after they couldn't track down anybody else senior to make the decision.



Is it this Independent article? Published on the one year anniversary of her death. It was Nik Gowing who had trouble with the printer according to this:

Quote:
In the midst of all this, Gowing's desktop printer broke down. Looking for some technical support, he spotted a chap with a beard and wearing jeans, wandering through the newsroom. Gowing demanded his aid in fixing the printer. The bearded man looked surprised but did oblige. And that is how Gowing first met Richard Ayre, deputy chief executive of BBC News.

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/diana-the-story-of-the-story-1195339.html
1
madmusician777 posts since 2 Jun 2006
Anglia (East) Look East
There was a wonderful article that appeared on one of these threads with real behind-the-scenes detail of how the print and broadcast media dealt with it. I can't track it down now (and it wasn't linked from that 2007 thread, perhaps there was a 2012 thread that had the story in?). It included wonderful anecdotes like a harassed producer at the BBC thrusting a printer at a man who he had never seen before (and assumed was a new junior member of staff), telling him "just make this work for me, please". It turned out to be a very senior figure in the news operation, who was reasonably new to the role. There was also a story about two sub-editors from the Telegraph who got the front page of the paper changed after they couldn't track down anybody else senior to make the decision.



Is it this Independent article? Published on the one year anniversary of her death. It was Nik Gowing who had trouble with the printer according to this:

Quote:
In the midst of all this, Gowing's desktop printer broke down. Looking for some technical support, he spotted a chap with a beard and wearing jeans, wandering through the newsroom. Gowing demanded his aid in fixing the printer. The bearded man looked surprised but did oblige. And that is how Gowing first met Richard Ayre, deputy chief executive of BBC News.

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/diana-the-story-of-the-story-1195339.html

YES - that's the one! Many thanks Smile