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Charlie Wells3,798 posts since 26 Nov 2003 Moderator
Anglia (West) Look East (West sub-opt)
World News page now using Reith.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world

Looks like it's been rolled out to a few other sections of the news website including science, health, and in pictures. These sections also happen to be using the wider page layout, and the ones which haven't changed appear to be using the 1000px max-width.
"Listen, we've all got something to bring to this conversation, but from now on what I think you should bring is silence." - Rimmer
Justin398 posts since 9 Oct 2014
BBC World News
I'm not quite if this has ever been posted here -- it is pretty old (six years), but this multi-page article from The Register about the launch of News Online is a real fascinating look at how the BBC first got the ball rolling for online stuff. https://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/11/28/the_bbc_news_online_story
Quote:
Smartt was adamant the site wouldn't lazily publish stories direct from the wire feeds. Instead, he and Eggington wanted to tap into the vast amount of high-quality output generated by the BBC, particularly its World Service division, which broadcast to more than 40 countries. The BBC’s radio journalists used a VAX minicomputer with a system called BASYS (which DEC had acquired in 1992) that became Avid iNews – and also a Unix system called Edit. If the radio news scripts were in a computer somewhere, why couldn’t News Online use them?

Many radio production staff were located overseas, and there was no budget to fly them to London to teach them coding. The web news team wondered how to lift the journalists' work with minimal disruption.

The developers decided to add three simple instructions to the existing workflow: the correspondents or producer must add a headline to the radio script, they must spell correctly, and they must not leave in cueing information – such as advice for a continuity announcer on how to pronounce a name, or when to discard a given script.

“There were bad at headlines at first, and they would write a whole paragraph for them, but they got the hang of it,” said Karas. “But it worked. An editor sitting in Moscow who had never seen a web page was producing web pages.”

Well worth a read if you haven't seen it before, like me.
Last edited by Justin on 11 June 2019 9:41am - 3 times in total
New Zealand isn't that far away!
1
Night Thoughts gave kudos
Neil Jones5,565 posts since 23 Dec 2001
Central (West) Midlands Today
I noticed yesterday that the Business news feed had marked a legacy business story as "breaking news" - it was about BHS "closing", when the company actually fell into administration in 2016. I notice that the BHS website seems to have been relaunched (again) under a brand licence.
1
what gave kudos
Night Thoughts242 posts since 24 Jan 2016
London London
I'm not quite if this has ever been posted here -- it is pretty old (six years), but this multi-page article from The Register about the launch of News Online is a real fascinating look at how the BBC first got the ball rolling for online stuff. https://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/11/28/the_bbc_news_online_story
Quote:
Smartt was adamant the site wouldn't lazily publish stories direct from the wire feeds. Instead, he and Eggington wanted to tap into the vast amount of high-quality output generated by the BBC, particularly its World Service division, which broadcast to more than 40 countries. The BBC’s radio journalists used a VAX minicomputer with a system called BASYS (which DEC had acquired in 1992) that became Avid iNews – and also a Unix system called Edit. If the radio news scripts were in a computer somewhere, why couldn’t News Online use them?

Many radio production staff were located overseas, and there was no budget to fly them to London to teach them coding. The web news team wondered how to lift the journalists' work with minimal disruption.

The developers decided to add three simple instructions to the existing workflow: the correspondents or producer must add a headline to the radio script, they must spell correctly, and they must not leave in cueing information – such as advice for a continuity announcer on how to pronounce a name, or when to discard a given script.

“There were bad at headlines at first, and they would write a whole paragraph for them, but they got the hang of it,” said Karas. “But it worked. An editor sitting in Moscow who had never seen a web page was producing web pages.”

Well worth a read if you haven't seen it before, like me.


One unofficial motto used at News Online in its first few years referred to the rest of the BBC: "Whoever they are, tell them to f--- off." It served them well.

When Ashley Highfield was BBC Online boss, and rebranded the whole enterprise BBCi, he banned the word "online", which meant the news site effectively lost its name; one of the craziest of the many crazy decisions made at the time.
1
Justin gave kudos
Asa3,572 posts since 22 Mar 2001 Administrator
Meridian (South East) South East Today


Spoilsports. They'll be removing the volume up to 11 option next Very Happy
4
sda|, London Lite and 2 others
  • Warbler
  • paul_hadley
gave kudos
Charlie Wells3,798 posts since 26 Nov 2003 Moderator
Anglia (West) Look East (West sub-opt)
Worth noting the BBC regional news pages have begun switching a new wider layout featuring Reith...
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/england/birmingham_and_black_country
...As in the past Birmingham & Black Country is amongst the first regions to go live.
"Listen, we've all got something to bring to this conversation, but from now on what I think you should bring is silence." - Rimmer