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Fluffy Bunny Feet405 posts since 11 Mar 2003
I keep passing digital ads for this on the tube into work and I know it's probably not aimed at my age group but I just can't really see how this can be a success in the long term. They're naming shows like Law and Order UK and the recently axed Wild Bill as highlights. Everything seems to be stuff that is constantly repeated on Drama and ITV3 and the like and I'd have thought that that age range would rather just continue watching it on linear. With only a handful of original series a year that's unlikely to be enough to draw people onto the platform.


Also what's going on in the incredibly irritating TV ad where the guy is going "Bang. Bang. Bang." in time with the music? What is that from?


Well think of it as a replacement for DVDs. When was the last time you bought either a BBC or ITV DVD of one of their shows. They have to move (late) with the times.
Fluffy Bunny Feet405 posts since 11 Mar 2003
The prime marketing group would appear to be those new to streaming, with an affection to 'normal' television content, there'll be many in that grouping. The lack of certain platforms at launch will hit this aim.

I suspect that BT YouView will announce a no additional cost incorporation into it's base layer in the new year along with it's relaunch. There's a lot of content that's duplicated with SKY's NOW TV pass and I can see these offerings transferring on BTTV to that access route, the channels being removed from BTTV's base offering. Substituting BritBox would be a suitable and effective offering in their places.

I'm still bemoaning the lack of significant quality documentary from BBC FOUR (ie those produced in OU partnership) though.

We'll see.

There's also Rights issues that need agreeing - if a doco was co-produced it's not automatically the broadcasters' property and it takes time to negotiate all the relevant deals.
London Lite11,092 posts since 4 Jan 2003
London London

There's also Rights issues that need agreeing - if a doco was co-produced it's not automatically the broadcasters' property and it takes time to negotiate all the relevant deals.


Indeed, which is why Line of Duty isn't on Britbox. It's still on Netflix UK. Kew Media distribute that show on behalf of World Productions, so it'll be a deal between ITV SVoD and Kew to get that on the platform rather than the BBC I would have thought?

There are some overlapping BBC Studios content which are both on Britbox and Netflix, Fawlty Towers springs to mind.
Brekkie33,058 posts since 4 Jan 2003
HTV Wales Wales Today
Just feels like streaming is going the way premium sports did - you used to have to subscribe to one service to get most of what you wanted, and now you have to subscribe to three or four.
I preferred the internet when it had a sense of humour.
London Lite11,092 posts since 4 Jan 2003
London London
Just feels like streaming is going the way premium sports did - you used to have to subscribe to one service to get most of what you wanted, and now you have to subscribe to three or four.


It's the way of the world. The likes of the BBC and ITV want more of the SVoD revenue pie, in the same way the EPL realised they could make more money by selling rights to other providers.

Keeping it Britbox based, their sub is cheaper than the two screens HD sub at Netflix, a new release on DVD and certainly less than a BBC DVD box set of which titles are increasingly being added.
Last edited by London Lite on 5 January 2020 12:04am
DVB Cornwall8,821 posts since 4 Dec 2003
Westcountry Spotlight
It's simply scale of demand, up to now producers haven't had the level of demand for streaming services globally due to poor internet streams and lack of equipment. Things have changed dramatically in the last two years on two fronts.

1. Most major countries now have a significant internet services which provide the majority (and yes I acknowledge there are those that don't) with speeds sufficient to stream at least one HD stream with additional basic browsing and audio services running concurrently. Many potential users have the ability to do much more than that too.
2 The number of Smart TVs and STBs hitting the market too is considerable, indeed virtually all TVs now on the market provide access to the popular services AND (crucially) are capable of being updated, either via firmware update or via deployment of apps, to handle new services within a reasonable timeframe of launch.

Up to now, that's led to bulk one stop services like Netflix and Amazon holding all the cards. Now the market has expanded due to the reasons highlighted above, unique offerings such as Disney+, AppleTV+ and Peacock have become viable and attactive so they don't need to pay third parties to flog content for them. It increases the bottom line once the infrastructure is built or acquired and maintained.

Bizarrely though a number of these single product services will be reliant on Amazon via Amazon Web Services for the storage and serving of content in their early days before they move to self hosted products.

Britbox does need to improve though to match the navigation of the other current offerings and probably the others to come too.
2
Brekkie and London Lite gave kudos
Fluffy Bunny Feet405 posts since 11 Mar 2003
Well think of it as a replacement for DVDs. When was the last time you bought either a BBC or ITV DVD of one of their shows. They have to move (late) with the times.


Last year actually. I might be old fashioned but I personally prefer the DVDs over streaming...


I'm with you about DVDs and Bluray as I prefer the physical copy but it's not the way the world is going...
Neil Jones5,847 posts since 23 Dec 2001
Central (West) Midlands Today
Well think of it as a replacement for DVDs. When was the last time you bought either a BBC or ITV DVD of one of their shows. They have to move (late) with the times.


Last year actually. I might be old fashioned but I personally prefer the DVDs over streaming...


I'm with you about DVDs and Bluray as I prefer the physical copy but it's not the way the world is going...


I don't deny it. Doesn't mean I have to use it.

It may well be that "old" methods of distribution like DVDs will come back into fashion much like Vinyl and to a lesser extent cassette tape has done.
London Lite11,092 posts since 4 Jan 2003
London London
I've got two large boxes of DVD's. I have no intention of getting rid of them as they'll come in handy if the internet goes down and there's nothing on Freeview to watch.

For Joe Public, either subscribing to one of these SVoD platforms, running a personal hard drive movie selection using Plex or buying films digitally is more convenient these days. At one time, Poundland could easily shift their £1 DVD/£2 BluRay selection of second hand classics, now they're largely gathering dust.

I still like CD's though, they're easy enough to convert to MP3 to listen on my phone, especially if they're cheaper than the digital download.