« Topics
1234
Steve in Pudsey7,967 posts since 4 Jan 2003
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
Not just BBC trucks, all (portable?) satellite earth stations licensed in the UK are prefixed UKI.

That includes flyaway suitcase sized kit, SNG trucks and massive trailer mounted dishes like the original UKI-1.

I think VSAT is licensed in a different way and may not use the same numbering scheme, although some trucks are capable of working both over VSAT and conventional uplink technologies so probably would need a UKI number for the latter.
Write that down in your copybook now.
Rkolsen1,185 posts since 20 Jan 2014
BBC World
Not just BBC trucks, all (portable?) satellite earth stations licensed in the UK are prefixed UKI.

That includes flyaway suitcase sized kit, SNG trucks and massive trailer mounted dishes like the original UKI-1.

I think VSAT is licensed in a different way and may not use the same numbering scheme, although some trucks are capable of working both over VSAT and conventional uplink technologies so probably would need a UKI number for the latter.

Thanks.
thegeek3,985 posts since 1 Jan 2002
London London
I noticed on Twitter in the past that BBC SNG trucks have the prefix UKI. Correct me if I'm wrong but I'm guessing UKI is an acronym for United Kingdom and Ireland?

Just United KIngdom - Irish dishes are prefixed IRL.

Transportable Earth Stations are generally country code + number, Fixed Earth Stations are country code + sitename + number. The BBC's main national trucks were the 'triples' - UKI-777, UKI-888 and UKI-999 - you may have occasionally seen their colour bars slip out on air - though I'm not sure if they've been replaced with recent upgrades. TV Centre's dishes were UKI-TVC1 up to about TVC13. When you get a big event (like a general election) which uses a lot of trucks, then it's not uncommon to see bookings from trucks prefixed F, E, D and DNK.

The point of them is so that you can identify yourself when lining up a transmission. Satellite space is tightly controlled. Each transponder will be leased out to a broadcaster or telco for fixed or occasional use, and with occasional use (ie ad-hoc transmissions), it's very important to check everything's right before bringing up a carrier - getting it wrong could interfere with other transmissions, or at worst, damage the satellite. That means the uplink operator has to call up the satellite operator, identify themselves, the channel they want to access, and be 'talked up' onto the bird - initially with an unmodulated, reduced-power transmission, to reduce the chances of interference in case the transmit chain is on the wrong frequency.

For Eutelsat's satellites, then their own CSC will do the line-ups, but if the company leasing the space is considered to be competent enough, then they can do their own line-ups: so the BBC's leased space on Eutelsat 7A and 10A are managed by their own Satellite Operations department.

Here's a pdf with more information than you probably wanted about satellite line-up procedures
6
Rkolsen1,185 posts since 20 Jan 2014
BBC World
I've heard about the BBC Raven for a while and realize it's purpose as a way to ingest files and play them out. However I read that they've been installed in their ENG/SNG trucks for use. How exactly are the Ravens used in these instances - do they just ingest footage into the hard drive and then connect it to the BBC archive or is the device used to edit and perhaps playback a package on air?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/internet/entries/41dd1a42-aac5-36ee-b9c8-ed361f935003
harshy5,367 posts since 24 Mar 2001
I noticed on Twitter in the past that BBC SNG trucks have the prefix UKI. Correct me if I'm wrong but I'm guessing UKI is an acronym for United Kingdom and Ireland?

Just United KIngdom - Irish dishes are prefixed IRL.

Transportable Earth Stations are generally country code + number, Fixed Earth Stations are country code + sitename + number. The BBC's main national trucks were the 'triples' - UKI-777, UKI-888 and UKI-999 - you may have occasionally seen their colour bars slip out on air - though I'm not sure if they've been replaced with recent upgrades. TV Centre's dishes were UKI-TVC1 up to about TVC13. When you get a big event (like a general election) which uses a lot of trucks, then it's not uncommon to see bookings from trucks prefixed F, E, D and DNK.

The point of them is so that you can identify yourself when lining up a transmission. Satellite space is tightly controlled. Each transponder will be leased out to a broadcaster or telco for fixed or occasional use, and with occasional use (ie ad-hoc transmissions), it's very important to check everything's right before bringing up a carrier - getting it wrong could interfere with other transmissions, or at worst, damage the satellite. That means the uplink operator has to call up the satellite operator, identify themselves, the channel they want to access, and be 'talked up' onto the bird - initially with an unmodulated, reduced-power transmission, to reduce the chances of interference in case the transmit chain is on the wrong frequency.

For Eutelsat's satellites, then their own CSC will do the line-ups, but if the company leasing the space is considered to be competent enough, then they can do their own line-ups: so the BBC's leased space on Eutelsat 7A and 10A are managed by their own Satellite Operations department.

Here's a pdf with more information than you probably wanted about satellite line-up procedures

I found a page which has the name of the satellite trucks in use and what it or has been used for
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/inwinter/dx/eutelsat_uki_reg.htm
1
Steve in Pudsey7,967 posts since 4 Jan 2003
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
I noticed on Twitter in the past that BBC SNG trucks have the prefix UKI. Correct me if I'm wrong but I'm guessing UKI is an acronym for United Kingdom and Ireland?

Just United KIngdom - Irish dishes are prefixed IRL.

Transportable Earth Stations are generally country code + number, Fixed Earth Stations are country code + sitename + number. The BBC's main national trucks were the 'triples' - UKI-777, UKI-888 and UKI-999 - you may have occasionally seen their colour bars slip out on air - though I'm not sure if they've been replaced with recent upgrades. TV Centre's dishes were UKI-TVC1 up to about TVC13. When you get a big event (like a general election) which uses a lot of trucks, then it's not uncommon to see bookings from trucks prefixed F, E, D and DNK.

The point of them is so that you can identify yourself when lining up a transmission. Satellite space is tightly controlled. Each transponder will be leased out to a broadcaster or telco for fixed or occasional use, and with occasional use (ie ad-hoc transmissions), it's very important to check everything's right before bringing up a carrier - getting it wrong could interfere with other transmissions, or at worst, damage the satellite. That means the uplink operator has to call up the satellite operator, identify themselves, the channel they want to access, and be 'talked up' onto the bird - initially with an unmodulated, reduced-power transmission, to reduce the chances of interference in case the transmit chain is on the wrong frequency.

For Eutelsat's satellites, then their own CSC will do the line-ups, but if the company leasing the space is considered to be competent enough, then they can do their own line-ups: so the BBC's leased space on Eutelsat 7A and 10A are managed by their own Satellite Operations department.

Here's a pdf with more information than you probably wanted about satellite line-up procedures

I found a page which has the name of the satellite trucks in use and what it or has been used for
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/inwinter/dx/eutelsat_uki_reg.htm


At the risk of taking this too far off-topic (I'll do an RTP and ask the mods to split this off) we know about UKI-1, the BBC's original uplink vehicle that was mounted on its own trailer and is still occasionaly used for receiving awkward feeds in the field.

But what was the IBA's truck-based uplink that was shipped to Jersey for Telethon 90?

Write that down in your copybook now.