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Neil DG2,458 posts since 4 Jan 2003
Granada North West Today
Two points:

1. 2018 is a long way away. I wonder what the reasoning behind the news being released now is.

2. The official press release isn't being properly reported by various news sites - it's Sky Q which will go dish free, not Sky+. With Sky Q currently being the premium product, I wonder if they will extend this 'down' to more regular customers (in the way Sky+ once was).

Press release: https://corporate.sky.com/media-centre/news-page/2017/award-winning-sky-q-to-launch-without-a-satellite-dish-%E2%80%93-bringing-sky-tv-to-millions-more-homes
Jake454 posts since 10 Jan 2006
Central (East) East Midlands Today
Two points:

1. 2018 is a long way away. I wonder what the reasoning behind the news being released now is.

2. The official press release isn't being properly reported by various news sites - it's Sky Q which will go dish free, not Sky+. With Sky Q currently being the premium product, I wonder if they will extend this 'down' to more regular customers (in the way Sky+ once was).

Press release: https://corporate.sky.com/media-centre/news-page/2017/award-winning-sky-q-to-launch-without-a-satellite-dish-%E2%80%93-bringing-sky-tv-to-millions-more-homes


Isn't Sky Q the standard box for new customers now?
The TV Forum Team
This topic has been moved from The Newsroom .
Bail3,445 posts since 30 Mar 2001 Moderator
Meridian (South) South Today
I've moved this over as its more technical than anything.

On a related note, assuming a switch over to "IPTV" happened today and all OTA ceased (and in this hypothetical situation, everyone has "reasonable" connection speeds) Could the main networks actually cope with an entire population steaming 4K content? That seems like a massive amount of bandwidth?
Bail.
London Lite7,077 posts since 4 Jan 2003
London London
Worth noting that Sky are only offering the IPTV Sky Q service for those who can't have a dish. Those who can will still be offered the satellite option.

This will enable Sky to offer their service to customers who can't have a dish because of landlord, planning or because of obstructions, targeting those who have Virgin or one of the IPTV services.
Omnipresent161 posts since 25 Jul 2012
London London
Like launching Sky Arts, Sky Atlantic and Now TV, this seems clearly aimed at capturing marginal subscription revenue from customers who wouldn't otherwise choose Sky.

Given the technical limitations of streaming I don't see it being a wholesale replacement of satellite in the medium term.
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