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Ne1L C827 posts since 11 Sep 2011
Hello

Having seen professional monitors being used in my local chemists I have a question. Can they be used as a monitor from home viewing?

For example could I plug a fire tv stick into an hdmi socket and use one that way?

Many thanks in advance for the replies

Neil
Markymark6,602 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
Hello

Having seen professional monitors being used in my local chemists I have a question. Can they be used as a monitor from home viewing?

For example could I plug a fire tv stick into an hdmi socket and use one that way?

Many thanks in advance for the replies

Neil


Not sure what you mean by professional monitors, in a chemists they will be digital signage monitors. If they have an HDMI socket ( which they almost certainly will if they are up to 6-7 years old) them yes, should be fine. The only slight problem is whether they are 16:9 aspect ratio, they might not be, so stuffing 1920x 1080 or 1280x720 into them may not result in quite the right image, it might have black bars and/or suffer geometric distortion
dosxuk4,163 posts since 22 Oct 2005
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
There are "commercial" grade monitors, which are the ones used for digital signage and the like, generally means you can leave them on 24 hours a day without ruining then (most domestic TV's are only rated for a couple of hours continuous use for things like heat dissipation), they're designed to be used in multiple orientations (portrait / landscape / in the middle) and don't have tuners (which attracts a different tax level). They also often have remote control options over RS232 or IP.

But yes, you can just plug anything you want into an HDMI port.
Whataday9,842 posts since 13 Sep 2001
HTV Wales Wales Today
We have a large flatscreen monitor in the office that came from a shop unit and it's definitely a monitor rather than a big TV, It has the same sort of refresh rate as old school PC monitor (and therefore would flicker if viewed through a camera). I am led to believe it's more appropriate because it doesn't burn like an regular TV does when left on for a long time.

It's pre-HDMI but didn't have the normal input you'd expect on the back of a TV. Its main input was VGA. It's being used as a CCTV monitor now.
noggin14,271 posts since 26 Jun 2001
Also beware that some monitors aimed at computing or digital signage, although they have HDMI inputs, may not support 50Hz sources. (Just like many TVs sold in the US don't)

Whilst 50Hz support is universal on pretty much every TV sold in Europe it isn't guaranteed on monitors aimed at computers or digital signage displays.

That said, a lot of professional large-screen displays from companies like Sony, sold in Europe, are slightly modified versions of consumer TVs (and often still include tuners). The main differences are usually that they include a legacy RS232 port or similar for remote control from AV integration systems in meeting rooms etc (rather than just IR and consumer IP control)