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Ne1L C343 posts since 11 Sep 2011
Hi everyone.

I'm thinking of subscribing to sky q but want to know if its possible to have the actual box in one part of the room and use remote control extenders to operate it e.g. with

I'm asking this because I'm not interested in the sky q mini box and I want to keep the server seperate.
bilky asko4,709 posts since 9 Sep 2006
Tyne Tees Look North (North East)
Hi everyone.

I'm thinking of subscribing to sky q but want to know if its possible to have the actual box in one part of the room and use remote control extenders to operate it e.g. with

I'm asking this because I'm not interested in the sky q mini box and I want to keep the server seperate.


Would you mind reformulating the question so it is understandable by humans?
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Rkolsen1,482 posts since 20 Jan 2014
BBC World
Hi everyone.

I'm thinking of subscribing to sky q but want to know if its possible to have the actual box in one part of the room and use remote control extenders to operate it e.g. with

I'm asking this because I'm not interested in the sky q mini box and I want to keep the server seperate.


Are you essentially saying that for example you'd want to place the box in say a cabinet (that would block the remote signal) and mount your TV on the wall? Sky Q's remote appears to be Bluetooth based (or they option a Bluetooth version) so it shouldn't be a problem.

Although I'm in the US I have a TiVo with a Bluetooth remote. I've used it 30 some feet away (it probably could go furthur) so say if I'm in the hall or a different room and the volumes turned up I can hear the TV or change the channel.
Ne1L C343 posts since 11 Sep 2011
I'll try and explain step by step:

1. Install Sky Q as normal and connect to tv set

2. Unplug tv set and take it to the other side of the room leaving Sky q as server

3. Connect tv set to sky mini box and use sky mini box to record and playback using the mini as "master" and the sky Q as "slave"

The reason I'm doing this is there are far too many cables in my current setup and as a side note i'm also looking at repositioning my router

Many thanks Very Happy
UKnews461 posts since 26 Apr 2011
Yes that will work, although the Q box will still technically be the ‘master’ as it holds all the recordings and streams them to the mini box (via Ethernet or WiFi).

Be aware if you ever want to get 4K the Sky mini boxes don’t have the hardware to support that. You’ll be able to record 4K programmes (if you have the 2TB box and relevant subscription) but they won’t play back on the mini box, only on the main Q box.

The standard remote for the Q box is Bluetooth, but they also supply an IR remote. The mini box is supplied with an IR remoge wnd doesn’t support the Bluetooth ‘touch’ remote - which is actually very good once you get used to it.
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UKnews461 posts since 26 Apr 2011
That’s pretty poor that if you subscribe to 4k then you should be possible to watch everywhere, this is sky not believing in better!

No, it’s about keeping the cost of the hardware down and making it work reliably (in that it’ll be easier to reliably stream 1080p over WiFi than it will 4K), along with the fact that most people will only have one 4K set and it’ll be connected to the main Q box. It is a bit of a problem that if you record or download 4K content you can’t watch it downscaled on the mini boxes. Otherwise it’s a very good system.
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noggin12,539 posts since 26 Jun 2001
Loving the discussion. How much more difficult will it be to stream 4K via wifi than 1080p?


Depends entirely on the bitrate of the UHD (aka 4K) material and the quality of the WiFi (and the congestion of your WiFi environment).

It is quite easy to stream UHD stuff at Netflix's low max bitrate of ~15Mbs (because they are 24-25p and pre-encoded) in a nice quiet rural environment with only one WiFI network and with the WiFi router/access point nice and close with only plasterboard walls in the way.

It is much more difficult to stream UHD stuff at a continuous live broadcast rate of ~25-30Mbs (with live encoding and 50p) in a busy urban area with 40+ WiFi networks in range, sharing frequencies, and with your router at the other end of your house or flat with thick stone or brick walls in the way of the router.