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London Lite9,652 posts since 4 Jan 2003
London London
Another theory I have is that Sky may be negotiating with the likes of NBC Universal (soon to be sister companies). Viacom and UKTV for HD versions of their channels. Currently all in SD for their linear versions. This would make the HD charge more viable if they can offer those channels in 1080p in addition to the Sky branded output.
noggin13,794 posts since 26 Jun 2001
I'd imagine a dishless Sky service to work pretty much like BT's, where you'll have to take Sky Broadband in order to use the service. In effect it'll become cable television, which Anyone who's used an IPTV service (and I mean the fly by night suppliers you pay for, rather than dodgy KODI add-ons) will have experienced the frustration you get once there's a big footy match or a major PPV fight.


Yep - that wouldn't be an issue with UDP Multicast IPTV as it isn't delivered over the internet, and won't be sharing bandwidth (other than your individual broadband connection) with anyone else. This is why BT Broadband has few issues delivering UHD football via their broadband system, but OTT providers fall over frequently on popular live events.

With OTT you have to send individual, separate, and unique streams from CDN servers over the internet to each and every individual viewer. With a UDP multicast style solution you distribute one stream to everyone (a bit like a TV transmitter does) and that is made available at ISP level to people connected to that particular ISP, but not sent via the public internet in the same way.
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noggin13,794 posts since 26 Jun 2001
I'd imagine a dishless Sky service to work pretty much like BT's, where you'll have to take Sky Broadband in order to use the service. In effect it'll become cable television, which Anyone who's used an IPTV service (and I mean the fly by night suppliers you pay for, rather than dodgy KODI add-ons) will have experienced the frustration you get once there's a big footy match or a major PPV fight.


Even NOW TV had major issues during football matches (and Game of Thrones) in the early days. I suspect this time round they'll want to iron out any issues before launching such a service which is premium this time round.


Yep - Now TV is a standard OTT unicast service so suffers from the same scaling issues as other OTT providers. DirecTV on Apple TV in the US uses a similar technique, but most IPTV solutions already in use in Europe that are working as 'cable replacement' systems (and in some cases appear to viewers as if they have cable) are using multicast instead of OTT.

It's also worth remembering that OTT unicast costs you 'per bit streamed' (unless you own your own CDN - which is what the BBC is doing partially - then you just pay for your own CDN infrastructure instead). If you can get multicast implemented, then you don't increase your costs for a given area as your number of viewers increases, just as with conventional broadcast.

It is - of course - possible that Sky are looking at a DirecTV-style OTT unicast solution though - which would be ISP-agnostic, but it seems a shame not to do what BT have done pretty successfully.
Last edited by noggin on 30 September 2018 3:24pm
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noggin13,794 posts since 26 Jun 2001
Isn't Virgin Media effectively multicast IPTV, albeit using their own cables and infrastructure?


No - Virgin Cable is DVB-C RF over Coax to the home, with broadband delivered by DOCSIS over Coax I believe. It may well be that the RF, as well as IP, services are distributed to nodes via fibre, as RF-over-Fibre is a popular technology.

DOCSIS used to use DVB-C muxes to carry the IP data from Virgin to consumers, with a different system used for the reverse connection, but the newer DOCSIS may use its own data standard now - rather than DVB-C QAM muxes. The 'lumps' you bought Virgin broadband speed in were effectively how many DVB-C muxes from the node to your home you had reserved AIUI.
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DVB Cornwall7,685 posts since 4 Dec 2003
Westcountry Spotlight
Widespread reports around of Now TV Content being compromised and losing definition on some Roku and Roku Derived (Now TV) boxes following a combination of changes to the Roku software and the Now TV app software on the boxes. I've had it once on the 4K device in which the picture drops to what looks like a poor 256*144 picture. I recovered by ensuring that the Now TV app had closed completely and doing a full restart of the box. The component software seemed to link together then.
DVB Cornwall7,685 posts since 4 Dec 2003
Westcountry Spotlight
T3 Online reporting that Downloads are coming for catchup content across Movies, Entertainment and Hayu before the end of the year on mobile devices. Some restrictions on content and limits to the number of downloads of individual items. Still nothing about HD though.
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DVB Cornwall7,685 posts since 4 Dec 2003
Westcountry Spotlight
What offers will have Now TV have on Black Friday 2018?
Two months of Entertainment for the price of one - £7.99, was £15.98
Two months of Sky Cinema for the price of one - £9.99, was £19.98
Two months of Kids for the price of one - £3.99, was £7.98
Two months of Entertainment and Sky Cinema for the price of one - £17.98, was £35.96
12 months of Entertainment - £45, was £95
12 months of Sky Cinema - £55, was £115
12 months of Entertainment + Sky Cinema - £99, was £215
Nine months of Sky Sports - £179, was £305
12 months of Kids - £15, was £47

(The Sun)
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