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noggin14,378 posts since 26 Jun 2001
City dwellers real can't seem to grasp the poor BB speeds even in many towns never mind rural locations. We get no more than about 10Mb which is not satisfactory for viewing its forever buffering. The infrastructure just isn't there most of where I live is copper wires, street after street


Being a city dweller, I wish I could get 10Mb, we only get 5Mb, and that's on a good day. It's a treat to visit my parents in their tiny little Norfolk village miles away from any notable population which gets 28Mb.


My in-laws get fibre-to-the-premises in their little village. 100Mbs or 1000Mbs are options - though I think they went for the 50Mbs lowest cost tier...
Markymark6,883 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
What are FTTC and FTTP. Not heard those terms before


FTTC Fibre to the Cabinet A fibre runs from the exchange to the street cabinet that’s typicaly 0 to 1000 metres from your house. The connection from the cabinet to your house is still copper

FTTP Fibre to The Premises. The fibre cable runs directly from exchange into your house ( Huge benefits of course)

Further reading

https://www.thinkbroadband.com/guides/fibre-fttc-ftth-broadband-guide
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noggin14,378 posts since 26 Jun 2001
What are FTTC and FTTP. Not heard those terms before


FTTC = Fibre to the Cabinet. Basically your existing phone line is still used to carry the broadband signal, but rather than it travelling all the way from the exchange over your phone line, your phone line is routed through a street cabinet with a fibre connection and a bunch of broadband kit in it (similar to the kit that would have been at the exchange). Your voice phone line goes back to the exchange just as it always did, but your broadband connection only has to travel a much shorter journey (to the cabinet) - and as broadband speeds drop with distance on copper/aluminium wires - speeds are higher this way.

FTTP = Fibre to the Premises. You have a new fibre optic cable connection all the way to your home, with a fibre optic modem installed in your house. This can offer 1Gbs connection speeds - or higher. But requires new cables to be laid to every home - which isn't anywhere near as cheap as re-using existing phone lines.

Virgin Media uses a third way. They have a network of coax cables to carry TV signals - and allocate some of the frequency band of these cables to carry broadband (the connection TO you is actually carried using the same modulation system as TV signals are carried). They call it fibre, but it doesn't involve fibre coming into your home...
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Pete9,031 posts since 18 Jun 2001
STV North Reporting Scotland
Virgin Media uses a third way. They have a network of coax cables to carry TV signals - and allocate some of the frequency band of these cables to carry broadband (the connection TO you is actually carried using the same modulation system as TV signals are carried). They call it fibre, but it doesn't involve fibre coming into your home...


How far does the fibre reach with Virgin? How fast can the coax reach? Obv they're currently providing 300mbit service over the same cables that used to provide 10 thanks to advances in the backhaul, changes in modulation, and newer modems but how fast can the coax theoretically reach?
ELM 2011: I am sick of been persicuted by you immature TV Forumers!
noggin14,378 posts since 26 Jun 2001
Virgin Media uses a third way. They have a network of coax cables to carry TV signals - and allocate some of the frequency band of these cables to carry broadband (the connection TO you is actually carried using the same modulation system as TV signals are carried). They call it fibre, but it doesn't involve fibre coming into your home...


How far does the fibre reach with Virgin? How fast can the coax reach? Obv they're currently providing 300mbit service over the same cables that used to provide 10 thanks to advances in the backhaul, changes in modulation, and newer modems but how fast can the coax theoretically reach?


I guess there is a trade-off between how many residences you run from the same feeder (i.e. how many separate RF slots you need to allocate to each consumer vs how many channels you us vs how granular your network is)

If you want to know the full capacity of a Virgin Media Coax - assuming you got rid of all the TV - then you have around 50 x 8MHz muxes (I think we use 8MHz for cable here) slots used just for TV - which will give you 50Mbs each mux - so that is around 2.5Gbs of bitrate for the digital TV services ignoring what they currently allocate for IP.

AIUI they allocate data using the same modulation scheme as the TV muxes - so 50Mbs=1 mux, 100Mbs=2 muxes etc. so the more muxes each consumer is allocated, the more granular the coax distribution has to be (as fewer people can share the same feed)

(That's unless Virgin are now using DOCSIS 3.1 which doesn't use DVB-C muxes for IP)