Mass Media & Technology

4K 3D televisions

Where can I find a good one?

BA
bilky asko Tyne Tees Look North (North East)
As others have said, your only bet to get both UHD and 3D together is to get a projector. The Optoma UHD51 is one example I can find with a quick search - £1299.00 on Amazon at the moment (plus the cost of a screen if you're wanting the best experience). Note that the 3D is limited to 1080p though.

Avatar Credit: © Independent Television News. Avatar Subject: Jonathan George Snow HonFRIBA
DA
davidhorman Channel Channel Islands

It a lot easier to get 76mm inter ocular when you are rendering a cgi movie..
And the doing are render at say 200mm for theatric presentation ...


Oh I see, you were talking about production rather than broadcast/projection. Not all movies are CGI (yet...) though, and I don't see why the inter-ocular distance should be different for TV vs film production. Don't both end up being displayed at a similar range of visual angles? Or is just a matter of different styles, that you'd want 3D Eastenders (good grief, what a thought) to look different from 3D Avatar ?
JO
johnnyboy Founding member Tyne Tees Look North (North East)
As others have said, your only bet to get both UHD and 3D together is to get a projector. The Optoma UHD51 is one example I can find with a quick search - £1299.00 on Amazon at the moment (plus the cost of a screen if you're wanting the best experience). Note that the 3D is limited to 1080p though.


Thanks for advice, bilky.

Do you have any experience of what projectors are like in a standard home? I have watched various reviews on YouTube including the excellent Techmoan's and the variety of opinions has left me in an unsure place about them compared to standard televisions.
OFCOM's queen bitch
NJ
Neil Jones Founding member Central (West) Midlands Today
I believe you require a very dark room to get the most out of a projector, as natural daylight will wash the image out too much to the point of virtually invisible regardless of whether you project the picture onto the wall or a screen. (some cheaper projectors may struggle in a room with curtains drawn at the height of a summers day, obviously subverted at this time of year). I think its all to do with the lux output, but of course they are almost certainly going to be quite expensive, and of course more money when the bulb packs up after a few thousand hours.
TE
Technologist London London

It a lot easier to get 76mm inter ocular when you are rendering a cgi movie..
And the doing are render at say 200mm for theatric presentation ...


Oh I see, you were talking about production rather than broadcast/projection. Not all movies are CGI (yet...) though, and I don't see why the inter-ocular distance should be different for TV vs film production. Don't both end up being displayed at a similar range of visual angles? Or is just a matter of different styles, that you'd want 3D Eastenders (good grief, what a thought) to look different from 3D Avatar ?

It's the distance to the screen which sets what goes on .... as well as Angles
NG
noggin Founding member
As others have said, your only bet to get both UHD and 3D together is to get a projector. The Optoma UHD51 is one example I can find with a quick search - £1299.00 on Amazon at the moment (plus the cost of a screen if you're wanting the best experience). Note that the 3D is limited to 1080p though.


Thanks for advice, bilky.

Do you have any experience of what projectors are like in a standard home? I have watched various reviews on YouTube including the excellent Techmoan's and the variety of opinions has left me in an unsure place about them compared to standard televisions.


I believe you require a very dark room to get the most out of a projector, as natural daylight will wash the image out too much to the point of virtually invisible regardless of whether you project the picture onto the wall or a screen. (some cheaper projectors may struggle in a room with curtains drawn at the height of a summers day, obviously subverted at this time of year). I think its all to do with the lux output, but of course they are almost certainly going to be quite expensive, and of course more money when the bulb packs up after a few thousand hours.


Projectors are really only a good idea for secondary displays when you want to watch movies. Most people I know use them alongside large flat panel OLED, LCD or Plasma displays, only using the projector for movie nights etc.

Basic rule of thumb is that the bigger the projected image size the brighter the projector needs to be, and in all cases your black levels are set by your ambient light levels (you can't project black light...) so you need similar ambient light levels to the cinema to get similar results (i.e. near total black out). Good quality screens can improve the brightness of the bright bits, but they won't do much for the dark bits - that needs good quality viewing conditions. There are a reason many people put their home cinema rooms in windowless basements Smile
bilky asko and johnnyboy gave kudos

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