Inspector Sands' posts

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Inspector Sands13,691 posts since 25 Aug 2004

Twitter (and other social media) Gold Thread


The caption before indicates it was an independent production (and with a 1989 date clearly very early on in the generic era), and has been seen down the years all sorts of unusual variants of logos have appeared on indie produced shows, on both ITV and the BBC. Quite possible the indy knocked up that endcap themselves.

Yes though Anglia never actually used it on air did they? So maybe the production company were sent that logo before Anglia knew what they were going to do with it
Inspector Sands13,691 posts since 25 Aug 2004

End credit oddities

It looks like Neil Shand co-wrote Carrotts material and also wrote one or more of the sketches too. The former he's down as 'associate' the latter as writer.


Script or Programme associate as has been said is usually a term for writer when they don't want to call them a writer for whatever reason. A good example is I'm Sorry I Haven't a Clue where Iain Pattinson has been 'Programme Associate' for about 30 years even though he's written the chairman's script for almost every episode in that time
Inspector Sands13,691 posts since 25 Aug 2004

Geo Targeted ads

The Global Player Alexa skill has access to the location provided by the device, so if you have the right weather forecast Global know exactly where you are. They usually use it to provide the right local station, for example if I say "play Heart" to my Echo it defaults to playing Heart Cambridge rather than the national feed.

That's strange, whenever I listen to Radio X on Alexa it says to set my postcode on the Alexa App, although looking it's just a permission thing
Inspector Sands13,691 posts since 25 Aug 2004

BBC regional news - Now with added Reith

I think Tunbridge Wells might have been the last, but that was replacing the Omnibus system they launched with in 2001.

The other region that got that was London, who never got Quantel but instead cobbled together something Mac based for a bit and then ended up sharing the systems used by the other studios at BH
Last edited by Inspector Sands on 19 August 2019 7:15pm
Inspector Sands13,691 posts since 25 Aug 2004

BBC regional news - Now with added Reith

I suspect the equipment installed is the same planned in the 2000’s for Sutton Harbour.

No, the BBC bought one production system (made by Quantel?) for each region in the early 2000s. Plymouth definately used theirs although I think they were the last because of the aborted plans to relocate.


What they got a few years ago when they had a big refurb had systems in use in BH like Mosart and of course it was HD. It certainly wasn't sitting around for 10 years and they hadn't been using a tape based workflow from the 90s
Inspector Sands13,691 posts since 25 Aug 2004

BBC regional news - Now with added Reith


Maybe get the regions with the most viewers in HD first like Look North Yorkshire?

When it's done, once they've decided what system to buy, I'd have thought it would be done in order of need. Those regions limping along with their old kit will go first. That said when they did the last big refresh in the early 2000's Leeds was one of the first along with Norwich and Birmingham. Nottingham have recently had a new system to try out, they've always been the odd one out as last time round it wasn't that old so went to the back of the queue


That's what's more important, how well the technology is performing
Last edited by Inspector Sands on 19 August 2019 11:38am
Inspector Sands13,691 posts since 25 Aug 2004

BBC regional news - Now with added Reith


The whole English regions thing is a joke, but the argument is would HD improve the content, probably not. 15 or so times the cost of Plymouth’s Tech upgrade - is it worth it when the corporation is trying to save money?

As has been pointed out her several times the main barrier is not the cost of upgrading the regions themselves it's the creation and distribution of lots of versions of BBC One HD. If that was in place there'd be nothing to stop them up converting any regions still producing in SD.


The regions are long due a refit so the cost of upgrading them is just part of the regular refresh cycle. I believe they're looking into what technology they should have. It probably won't be what Plymouth got
1
Lou Scannon gave kudos
Inspector Sands13,691 posts since 25 Aug 2004

CBS and Viacom Merge becomes VIACOMCBS

I managed to just about keep up, but yes the voiceover was a bit fast.

It does seem to be the YouTube style these days to edit every pause out and even the tiniest silence out to make it really really tight and fast and so there are absolutely no gaps at all its what Steve Wright does to his interviews on Radio 2 and it's really annoying... *deep breath*

Oh and its compulsory to start your video 'hey guys'
Last edited by Inspector Sands on 19 August 2019 8:21am
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Steve in Pudsey gave kudos
Inspector Sands13,691 posts since 25 Aug 2004

40th anniversary of the ITV strike

I believe that the ITCA (Independent Television Companies Association) proposed to the IBA that the transmitters be shut down in mid September rather than continue with the caption. This suggestion was denied by the IBA primarily due to fears that post strike some wouldn’t come back on line properly resulting in more expense and delay in re-establishment of service.

Would that have been an issue in 1979? The transmitters were switched off every night and always came back on. Probably more of a issue with the older 405 line ones too

It was an issue years later once things went 24 hours. I remember being told that when the original BBC UHF transmitters were replaced they had trouble turning the outgoing ones off as the switches that once were used every night hadn't been used for years and wouldn't turn off. They had to turn the main breakers off instead
Inspector Sands13,691 posts since 25 Aug 2004

Power outage at BBC Wales

UPS have become much more manageable these days, so essential kit can be kept running, although the kit itself is now more power hungry than the old line recieve and line send amplifiers back in the 1980s.
What sort of site vere you working in ( an island site for example)?

It was part of a fibre ring, so all that was needed was to keep the traffic moving around that. Doesn't take much power
Inspector Sands13,691 posts since 25 Aug 2004

Power outage at BBC Wales

At a place I worked a while back we had a rather limited UPS backup which would only keep us up and running for half hour (depending on how much load we were drawing), just enough to (hopefully) be able to de-power everything essential. But our broadcast network was a loop around sites so it passed through us and had it's own seperate battery back up UPS which, as it was just powering a few bits of kit.

Maybe that's the same in this case, there's a seperate backup power just enough to maintain distribution circuits into and back out of the building?
Inspector Sands13,691 posts since 25 Aug 2004

40th anniversary of the ITV strike

Did this strike might ITV stockpile more programmes? Have a bigger buffer between production finishing and broadcasting?

The ITV companies wouldn't have been making any programmes so they'd have ended the strike with as many as they started it with

Were ITV companies making any shows for the BBC around 1978 or is that something that came later. If they were presumably any shows not in the can would have been replaced on the BBC.

Making programmes for the other side!?!? Heresy in those days
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Brekkie gave kudos