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Araminta Kane

A member since 8 December 2015


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Araminta Kane

New BBC One North

Yes, Liverpool and Manchester have a shared history of being port cities, with access to Black American music before that was levelled out to places such as I live in in the internet era, and also a shared history of strong Irish connexions. These attributes brought about a shared wariness of the old English establishment; they are both more pro-American culturally than many other parts of England *and*, as we found out in 2016, more pro-European politically than the great majority of the North and Midlands (and several of the few other Remain areas - Harrogate, South Lakeland, Warwick & Leamington - are really more like the affluent Home Counties Remain areas).

This is a different situation from the south, where there is a clear distinction between "America-facing" (generally more working-class areas like Weymouth & Portland) and "Europe-facing" (generally more middle-class areas like Dorchester & Sherborne; I can tell you that Weymouth & Portland, even today, has a considerably stronger concentration of satellite dishes than Dorchester) although, as with Harrogate & South Lakeland, the latter areas do tend to be stronger Lib Dem areas in the south, and the former stronger Labour areas. But it is also different from north-east England which is both less politically pro-European *and* historically less aligned towards Black American music; the side of the country it is on was historically significant in the latter field, though obviously it would in theory work against the former field and it clearly doesn't. But to get this back to pres, it might well be notable and significant that Tyne Tees always used to play GSTQ whereas Granada & Yorkshire didn't - north-eastern socialism, now challenged by the post-Brexit realignment, has been less internationalist and more "patriotic" I think, with the lack of the north-west's massive Irish influence hugely important.

Highest kudoed post

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Araminta Kane

Are there too many channels?

Extraordinary that someone can claim BBC2, which has existed for over half a century, shouldn't be there.

But that's the thing about people who don't understand the wider context in which television exists: all they do is parrot names and lists, not ideas.