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40 years since itv extended hours: 16th Oct 1972

Started with rainbow a british Revolution in better Kids TV (October 2012)

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:-(
A former member
P.S. I found an interesting article on Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sesame_Street_in_the_U.K.

It seems that elitism and anti-Americanism were among the major reasons for the hostility.


I created that. Someone else copied edited it, your be glad to hear Very Happy
RJ
RJG
It wasn't just the kids shows that started on 16/10/72 it was the start of ITV's extended hours, pushing the schools back to a noon finish time and the launch of programmes like Crown Court and the forerunner to the lunchtime news


Not all ITV regions carried the full extended programme schedule from the start. Border, for instance, and a few of the other "smaller" regions, still had schools programmes split between morning and afternoon for some time after broadcasting hours restrictions were relaxed.
:-(
A former member
RJG posted:
It wasn't just the kids shows that started on 16/10/72 it was the start of ITV's extended hours, pushing the schools back to a noon finish time and the launch of programmes like Crown Court and the forerunner to the lunchtime news


Not all ITV regions carried the full extended programme schedule from the start. Border, for instance, and a few of the other "smaller" regions, still had schools programmes split between morning and afternoon for some time after broadcasting hours restrictions were relaxed.


I wonder why it took a year ( Sept/oct 73) for the smaller stations to catch up.
BH
BillyH Founding member
This is probably one of the oddest questions I've ever asked on this forum, but how far behind episode-wise were Channel 4 in showing Sesame Street than in the US?

I ask because apparently the original opening theme was replaced by a more modern remix on the show in 1992, which seems far too early for me to remember the original theme but I'm sure I do. Certainly around about 2000 I remember catching the end of a few episodes before The Big Breakfast started, and they were copyrighted about 1997/8...
WW
WW Update
P.S. I found an interesting article on Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sesame_Street_in_the_U.K.

It seems that elitism and anti-Americanism were among the major reasons for the hostility.


I created that. Someone else copied edited it, your be glad to hear Very Happy


It's a very interesting article. Thanks, 623058!
RJ
RJG
RJG posted:
It wasn't just the kids shows that started on 16/10/72 it was the start of ITV's extended hours, pushing the schools back to a noon finish time and the launch of programmes like Crown Court and the forerunner to the lunchtime news


Not all ITV regions carried the full extended programme schedule from the start. Border, for instance, and a few of the other "smaller" regions, still had schools programmes split between morning and afternoon for some time after broadcasting hours restrictions were relaxed.


I wonder why it took a year ( Sept/oct 73) for the smaller stations to catch up.


I think it was financial....schools programmes were "free" but other shows had to be bought in or made locally....maybe Border, and others, felt there wouldn''t be enough advertising sold to support a full daytime schedule.
:-(
A former member
RJG posted:
RJG posted:
It wasn't just the kids shows that started on 16/10/72 it was the start of ITV's extended hours, pushing the schools back to a noon finish time and the launch of programmes like Crown Court and the forerunner to the lunchtime news


Not all ITV regions carried the full extended programme schedule from the start. Border, for instance, and a few of the other "smaller" regions, still had schools programmes split between morning and afternoon for some time after broadcasting hours restrictions were relaxed.


I wonder why it took a year ( Sept/oct 73) for the smaller stations to catch up.


I think it was financial....schools programmes were "free" but other shows had to be bought in or made locally....maybe Border, and others, felt there wouldn''t be enough advertising sold to support a full daytime schedule.


I have looked at nov 72, and utv, border, GTV start the schoosl at 10.50 most of the time broadcast the kids shows at 12pm - 12.40, then first report. 30mins show, then back to schools at 1.40- 3pm.
MK
Mr Kite
It seems that elitism and anti-Americanism were among the major reasons for the hostility.


It was most likely because it was supposed to be an educational show which was brought to us by the letter 'zee' and the words 'color', 'jello' and 'potato chips'. UK TV companies can hardly be described as anti-American. Indeed, both the BBC and ITV have relied on US TV shows to compliment their schedules for decades. It's far from true the other way around.
JA
JAS84
It seems that elitism and anti-Americanism were among the major reasons for the hostility.


It was most likely because it was supposed to be an educational show which was brought to us by the letter 'zee' and the words 'color', 'jello' and 'potato chips'. UK TV companies can hardly be described as anti-American. Indeed, both the BBC and ITV have relied on US TV shows to compliment their schedules for decades. It's far from true the other way around.
Separated by a common language indeed. Both chips and jelly mean different things in the UK and US. Color is just a different spelling though and thus not really an issue, as the word would usually be spoken instead of spelt out.
WW
WW Update
It seems that elitism and anti-Americanism were among the major reasons for the hostility.


It was most likely because it was supposed to be an educational show which was brought to us by the letter 'zee' and the words 'color', 'jello' and 'potato chips'. UK TV companies can hardly be described as anti-American. Indeed, both the BBC and ITV have relied on US TV shows to compliment their schedules for decades. It's far from true the other way around.


Perhaps, but having grown up in a small country, I think it's perfectly natural that children -- even young children -- are exposed to programming from other countries. It makes them realize just how diverse the world is. In the article cited, many people were faulting Sesame Street primarily for being American. I consider that a weak argument.

If the few linguistic differences were really such a big deal, the BBC could have launched a UK version of Sesame Street . Broadcasters in many other European countries did just that (France's TF1 with 1, rue SÚsame , for instance).

There was also a fair deal of elitism on display. The article mentions that children and their parents rather liked Sesame Street , and that most of the opposition came from educators, some of whom considered it "vulgar" (a world popular among cultural elitists of that era). Surely the decision of whether the show was appropriate should have been made by parents and their children?
:-(
A former member
Other shows which started to appear included:

* Houseparty
* Scotch Corner
* Good Afternoon
* woman only
* Farmhouse Kitchen
* LOOKS FAMILIAR

It should be noted not all stations took the, as seen here: http://www.tvforum.co.uk/tvhome/networked-itv-1990s-31327/ you may have to read a good bit.
Last edited by A former member on 16 October 2012 6:01pm
JJ
jjne
Interesting thread -- I'd never even heard of Sesame Street until 1982, since both stations we received -- YTV and TTTV -- hadn't shown it. I'm assuming that the reason for that was the Trident thing.

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