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Nooze110 posts since 13 Mar 2007
I noticed that today... I don't like it, it was strange. Maybe it'll grow on me, though I'm rarely in in the day to watch the news anyway. At first I thought Krishnan was just pointing to the US presidential candidates but then realised it was a touch screen thing. A couple of times he pressed it and it didnt work though, so had to do it again. Why have they introduced it? - I'm not registered on Broadcast so havent read the article.
Stuart7,318 posts since 13 Oct 2003
I didn't see the programme but will certainly Sky+ it tomorrow. Seems like a nice idea, and appears to give the presenter an element of control. I doubt whether it changes the amount of instructions that are barked at him/her from the gallery through the earpiece though.

I'm sure they have to stick to the pre-arranged schedule for items. I'd really like to see how it would work in a breaking news situation though; although that isn't what C4 News at Noon is about.
grattz130 posts since 7 Mar 2006
To me this approach does not seem very professional. Instead of concentrating on the news content, it almost distracts the viewer on what the presenter is doing especially when it comes to transitions when the newsreader has to fiddle with the control on the desk. It may not seem so bad if the control was a handheld wireless device however this may not be feasible.

To be honest it really could be a PowerPoint on the screen with the simple fade animations. It just seems to operate like a Smart Board making it appear cheaper than other possible delivery methods. Maybe it will improve and become less distracting but as an above post says that the screen does not register the touch at points making the flow of the programme very jaggered at times.
Andrew13,914 posts since 27 Mar 2001
It seems very cheap. If the presenter is going to have his own buttons then at least keep them out of shot. It does look like he's doing a powerpoint presentation
noggin14,651 posts since 26 Jun 2001
Wasn't Tom Heap doing this on News 24 years ago with a touch screen plasma - possibly for the Iraq war coverage in 2003? Suddenly everyone seems to be doing it again, as if it were something new...
House3,169 posts since 13 Mar 2007
noggin posted:
Suddenly everyone seems to be doing it again, as if it were something new...
Who, other than C4, is doing this?

And what's the point? It just makes it look cheaper and that they didn't rehearse it or something! You can get away with it for something like the weather, but something that obvious!
noggin14,651 posts since 26 Jun 2001
imnogoth posted:
noggin posted:
Suddenly everyone seems to be doing it again, as if it were something new...
Who, other than C4, is doing this?

And what's the point? It just makes it look cheaper and that they didn't rehearse it or something! You can get away with it for something like the weather, but something that obvious!

Most of the US Network News operations - including CNN - have touch-plasmas or similar for "show and tell" explanations. John King was using one on the New Hampshire primaries coverage a day or two ago on CNN.
benjy1,864 posts since 4 Jan 2003
I can't really see this catching on! It's just a gimmick really - even Channel 4 admit this in their statement about it - "The new technology is a way of presenting material in a new/different way. The presenter gains more control over the system, but the production needs behind the scene are pretty much the same. "

It just makes the interviews conducted look stunted. Just saw Krishnan conducting a preliminary interview with two guests over the touch screen, faffing around with pressing on the screen after posing each question. Now he's talking to the two again via split-screen on the large screen behind him. Looked 100 times better!
Londoner7,256 posts since 4 Jan 2003
Trevor McDonald will also use a touch-screen on the new News at Ten (see NaT thread for Media Guardian link) - wonder if it's the same one C4 are using at noon?