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BBC World | 30 Years Anniversary - Page 127 (October 2019)

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UN
Universal_r
Looks like it was more than the autocue as they went outside source style with just the 1 locked camera shot Until about quarter past.
MA
Markymark
I

I'm trying to remember if Droitwich 200 (as it was until Feb 88. ) was switched off overnight when Radio 2 was carried? R2 up until 1979 closed down between 2am and 5am. It's possible it carried the WS back as far as then?


If you could get your hands on a copy of the World Radio and TV Handbook from the 70's it would probably tell you. I remember that it listed the BBC World Service in it and included the hours of MW and LW broadcasts. But those were copies from the 80's that I saw and I haven't seen a copy of the book for decades at this stage.


By proxy I can confirm the 1977 WRTH lists 200 kHz as in use by the BBC External Services. The memory of the book's owner is that the frequency was used 'ad hoc' very early on. Possibly back into the 60s
ST
Ste Founding member



The World Service would be carried overnight on Droitwich 198 from 2am to 5.30am (I think) Radio 4 closed down at 12.25 appox, and then there was usually silence until a few minutes before 2am when you'd hear church bells.


Was it these bells - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gOPKk78qAjk ? That is a recording from the 1920s I think and is still used as the BBC World Service interval signal on shortwave (played for a few minutes before a frequency starts up to help tuning into the correct frequency).
Last edited by Ste on 16 February 2021 10:36am
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JA
james-2001
The World Service would be carried overnight on Droitwich 198 from 2am to 5.30am (I think) Radio 4 closed down at 12.25 appox, and then there was usually silence until a few minutes before 2am when you'd hear church bells..


Yep, that's the Bow Bells interval signal, they used to use it before many Short Wave broadcasts in English too (they used different ones for non-English broadcasts). Maybe they still do use it sometimes, they were around 10 years ago. The scary thing is it's a recording which apparently dates back to 1926, and it's been in use into the 21st century!

Edit: I notice the post above me mentioned this too!
ST
Ste Founding member
The World Service would be carried overnight on Droitwich 198 from 2am to 5.30am (I think) Radio 4 closed down at 12.25 appox, and then there was usually silence until a few minutes before 2am when you'd hear church bells..


Yep, that's the Bow Bells interval signal, they used to use it before many Short Wave broadcasts in English too (they used different ones for non-English broadcasts). Maybe they still do use it sometimes, they were around 10 years ago. The scary thing is it's a recording which apparently dates back to 1926, and it's been in use into the 21st century!

Edit: I notice the post above me mentioned this too!


No problem Smile

Yes it is still used on shortwave, the non-English language broadcasts use this one - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cuVAv0DNu-w which is three notes, pitched B–B-C. There is also morse code for V (for victory from 1941) which as far as I know isn't used anymore.
MA
Markymark
I

I'm trying to remember if Droitwich 200 (as it was until Feb 88. ) was switched off overnight when Radio 2 was carried? R2 up until 1979 closed down between 2am and 5am. It's possible it carried the WS back as far as then?


If you could get your hands on a copy of the World Radio and TV Handbook from the 70's it would probably tell you. I remember that it listed the BBC World Service in it and included the hours of MW and LW broadcasts. But those were copies from the 80's that I saw and I haven't seen a copy of the book for decades at this stage.


By proxy I can confirm the 1977 WRTH lists 200 kHz as in use by the BBC External Services. The memory of the book's owner is that the frequency was used 'ad hoc' very early on. Possibly back into the 60s


More info unearthed, the practice dates back to 1950.
UKnews and Night Thoughts gave kudos
JA
james-2001
Ste posted:
There is also morse code for V (for victory from 1941) which as far as I know isn't used anymore.


It was still in use into the mid-00s, but it was only used I think on European language services, which have all been closed down. Shortwave broadcasts have been decimated in the last 20 or so years which is a shame... even though it is understandable with so many easier (and cheaper) ways to get the services to people.
JA
james-2001

If you could get your hands on a copy of the World Radio and TV Handbook from the 70's it would probably tell you. I remember that it listed the BBC World Service in it and included the hours of MW and LW broadcasts. But those were copies from the 80's that I saw and I haven't seen a copy of the book for decades at this stage.


By proxy I can confirm the 1977 WRTH lists 200 kHz as in use by the BBC External Services. The memory of the book's owner is that the frequency was used 'ad hoc' very early on. Possibly back into the 60s


More info unearthed, the practice dates back to 1950.


This artcle says February 1953, moved from a transmitter near Hull:

http://www.bbceng.info/Operations/transmitter_ops/Reminiscences/Droitwich/droitwich_calling.htm
MA
Markymark

By proxy I can confirm the 1977 WRTH lists 200 kHz as in use by the BBC External Services. The memory of the book's owner is that the frequency was used 'ad hoc' very early on. Possibly back into the 60s


More info unearthed, the practice dates back to 1950.


This artcle says February 1953, moved from a transmitter near Hull:

http://www.bbceng.info/Operations/transmitter_ops/Reminiscences/Droitwich/droitwich_calling.htm


Yes, the article I've been shown was the Copenhagen Plan that came into effect in 1950, allowed a power increase for Droitwich 200 kHz, but removed from BBC use 167 kHz (Daventry ?). There's an implication that the BBC started using Droitwich overnight for broadcasts into Europe just three months later. Anyway, 1950 or 1953, it's still over 40 years before the night-time WS broadcasts became part of an 'advertised' UK schedule
HB
HarryB
Ben Bland rebrands:

http://www.benbland.com/name-change
JA
james-2001

More info unearthed, the practice dates back to 1950.


This artcle says February 1953, moved from a transmitter near Hull:

http://www.bbceng.info/Operations/transmitter_ops/Reminiscences/Droitwich/droitwich_calling.htm


Yes, the article I've been shown was the Copenhagen Plan that came into effect in 1950, allowed a power increase for Droitwich 200 kHz, but removed from BBC use 167 kHz (Daventry ?). There's an implication that the BBC started using Droitwich overnight for broadcasts into Europe just three months later. Anyway, 1950 or 1953, it's still over 40 years before the night-time WS broadcasts became part of an 'advertised' UK schedule


I guess it's possible broadcasts on 1500m/200kHz overnight did start in 1950, albeit from Ottringham rather than Droitwich, and it was 1953 when they started coming from Droitwich instead. I imagine we could spend ages trying to find out details and never really knowing though, so few records from that era.
JA
james-2001
Speaking of the World Service, or the "Empire Service" as it was back then, I find it amusing that the launch consisted of a speech by lord Reith which included "the programmes will be neither very interesting or very good". What a way to talk up the service and encourage people to listen 🤣
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