The Newsroom

BBC News (UK) presentation - Reith launch onwards

From Monday 15th July 2019

RN
Rolling News Central (East) East Midlands Today
Who did 16:00-19:00 BST on BBC World today?
FI
Fitzer
Who did 16:00-19:00 BST on BBC World today?

Matthew Amroliwala
IT
itsrobert Founding member Granada North West Today


Mmmmmm that 2001 overnight headline bed. But does anyone know why it was pitched up slightly compared to everything else? It's not even a full semi-tone, but the News 24 and World beds are all at the correct pitch (of B♭ for those playing at home)


I've been wondering this for 20 years. I make no apologies for essentially bumping this post, as it's a mystery up there with Lord Lucan.

I've also wondered why for a long time. I recall asking someone who worked at BBC News in 2001 and he didn't exactly say but I got the impression he wasn't too impressed with it. The only guess that I can make is that it was decided to use the regular World vamp but with an extended front (that was to mask the opt in overnight - World could crash into News 24 and it wouldn't sound too bad). Maybe the extended front sounded a bit too slow so they sped up the vamp, altering the pitch in the process?

It's the only suggestion I can come up with. Unless it was some kind of dubbing error when making a copy of the World vamp to edit? I'm not exactly sure of how they would have achieved something like that in 2001. I wonder if they were editing audio on PCs by that time? Another friend who worked at BBC News in the 1990s told me that after 1/4" tape had made its exit, audio editing was done on something called SADiE. I get the impression it was some kind of fairly primitive digital editing kit. Around the same time over at ITN they used to edit audio on a piece of kit called the Shortcut '99 by 360 Systems:

*

This was the companion audio editor to the Instant Replay that was used for TX:

*

This particular example was the workhorse that serviced the ITN/ITV News Channel for its entire run!
AS
Asa Admin Meridian (South East) South East Today
Who did 16:00-19:00 BST on BBC World today?

Please remember this is not a rota thread - there’s a pinned announcement - https://tvforum.uk/thenewsroom/presenter-rota-40301 for what is acceptable.

It’s extremely frustrating for members who want to read and discuss presentation aspects of the news channel to have to wade through messages about a particular presenter or who presented when.

It’s crept in from a number of members lately and has to stop.
RN
Rolling News Central (East) East Midlands Today
My apologies - posted in the wrong thread by accident Sad
FF
FactorFiles World News

Mmmmmm that 2001 overnight headline bed. But does anyone know why it was pitched up slightly compared to everything else? It's not even a full semi-tone, but the News 24 and World beds are all at the correct pitch (of B♭ for those playing at home)


I've been wondering this for 20 years. I make no apologies for essentially bumping this post, as it's a mystery up there with Lord Lucan.

I've also wondered why for a long time. I recall asking someone who worked at BBC News in 2001 and he didn't exactly say but I got the impression he wasn't too impressed with it. The only guess that I can make is that it was decided to use the regular World vamp but with an extended front (that was to mask the opt in overnight - World could crash into News 24 and it wouldn't sound too bad). Maybe the extended front sounded a bit too slow so they sped up the vamp, altering the pitch in the process?

It's the only suggestion I can come up with. Unless it was some kind of dubbing error when making a copy of the World vamp to edit? I'm not exactly sure of how they would have achieved something like that in 2001. I wonder if they were editing audio on PCs by that time? Another friend who worked at BBC News in the 1990s told me that after 1/4" tape had made its exit, audio editing was done on something called SADiE. I get the impression it was some kind of fairly primitive digital editing kit. Around the same time over at ITN they used to edit audio on a piece of kit called the Shortcut '99 by 360 Systems:

*

This was the companion audio editor to the Instant Replay that was used for TX:

*

This particular example was the workhorse that serviced the ITN/ITV News Channel for its entire run!


Well that was all totally awesome. The weird thing is that the 'pitch up' exists on the MP3 packages that we all have. I guess it depends on what the original source for those MP3s was, and if they were literally transferred off the playback system at the Beeb. I always assumed they were more directly sourced from DL or L-N.
DE
deejay Oxford
SADiE wasn’t primitive, it was extremely advanced for its day. It was PC based audio editing software which was used by a lot of broadcasters for digital audio editing. I used it in my first job at a facilities house in 1992. It stored the sound on SCSI plug in hard drives, sourced from digital or analogue inputs and could output back digitally or as an analogue wave. I think BBC Radio used SADiE in some of their first digital audio editing suites.
Two minutes regions...
IT
itsrobert Founding member Granada North West Today

I've been wondering this for 20 years. I make no apologies for essentially bumping this post, as it's a mystery up there with Lord Lucan.

I've also wondered why for a long time. I recall asking someone who worked at BBC News in 2001 and he didn't exactly say but I got the impression he wasn't too impressed with it. The only guess that I can make is that it was decided to use the regular World vamp but with an extended front (that was to mask the opt in overnight - World could crash into News 24 and it wouldn't sound too bad). Maybe the extended front sounded a bit too slow so they sped up the vamp, altering the pitch in the process?

It's the only suggestion I can come up with. Unless it was some kind of dubbing error when making a copy of the World vamp to edit? I'm not exactly sure of how they would have achieved something like that in 2001. I wonder if they were editing audio on PCs by that time? Another friend who worked at BBC News in the 1990s told me that after 1/4" tape had made its exit, audio editing was done on something called SADiE. I get the impression it was some kind of fairly primitive digital editing kit. Around the same time over at ITN they used to edit audio on a piece of kit called the Shortcut '99 by 360 Systems:

*

This was the companion audio editor to the Instant Replay that was used for TX:

*

This particular example was the workhorse that serviced the ITN/ITV News Channel for its entire run!


Well that was all totally awesome. The weird thing is that the 'pitch up' exists on the MP3 packages that we all have. I guess it depends on what the original source for those MP3s was, and if they were literally transferred off the playback system at the Beeb. I always assumed they were more directly sourced from DL or L-N.

Well, I remember that the overnight vamp was high pitched on TV so the copies we have would be the same as the original source. I'm almost certain that vamp was a BBC edit rather than composed by David Lowe.

SADiE wasn’t primitive, it was extremely advanced for its day. It was PC based audio editing software which was used by a lot of broadcasters for digital audio editing. I used it in my first job at a facilities house in 1992. It stored the sound on SCSI plug in hard drives, sourced from digital or analogue inputs and could output back digitally or as an analogue wave. I think BBC Radio used SADiE in some of their first digital audio editing suites.

Thanks deejay. Sorry, I meant 'primitive' in the sense that it's primitive when compared to today's technology. The Instant Replay was, I believe, very advanced for its day too. I understand the machine in that photo above was used in a sort of semi-automated way. Apparently it contained hundreds of versions of the ITN News Channel opening music complete with different voiceovers for each presenter. The vision mixer sent some kind of signal to the Instant Replay to trigger playback of the pre-selected track. The sound mixer on duty had to make sure the correct presenter version was selected before it was required. That Instant Replay did a great deal of work in 5 years! That's a very layman's explanation but it's how I understood it as it was told to me. I'm sure someone might be able to fill in the technical details of how that was achieved.

ITN did also use the Sonifex Discart (https://www.sonifex.co.uk/technical/faq/discartfaq.shtml) as a stepping stone from 1/4" tape to Instant Replay, which I've always found very curious as it was more prevalent in radio, I believe. The Discart system used floppy disks (!) to store audio that was played by the machine. I think they were large capacity floppies but, even so, I don't think they could store much more than a minute of audio in any kind of high fidelity. It was a surprising choice for ITN television output - I believe it was used mainly in the atrium studios for ITV and C5 bulletins in the late 90s and played in a variety of stings, bed loops and voiceovers.
JF
JF World News West Country (East) Points West
Wonder why Nationwide couldn't be slotted into OS at 20:30.
RN
Rolling News Central (East) East Midlands Today
Wonder why Nationwide couldn't be slotted into OS at 20:30.

Nationwide ended 37 years ago.
IT
itsrobert Founding member Granada North West Today
Wonder why Nationwide couldn't be slotted into OS at 20:30.

Nationwide ended 37 years ago.

RN
Rolling News Central (East) East Midlands Today
Oops, my bad 🙈

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