The Newsroom

BBC NEWS CUTS

Cuts reactivated - P43 onwards

BR
Brekkie Wales Wales Today

I don't think that's the case in the UK at all. Maybe in America, but in the UK, this event did not have the cultural resonance that it had in the US. Just because we know something, doesn't mean everybody or even the vast majority does.

Did you not go to school? If there are two names you should remember from being taught about the civil rights movement it would be Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks?
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I was at school in the 70s, I don't recall being taught anything about civil rights etc, such things were kept brushed under the carpet

By the time I made it to school in the 90s it was considered history. Going way off topic but we seemed to learn far more about American political history than British political history. I think the UK history I was taught was basically 1066, Tudors and Stewarts, Queen Victoria and the two World Wars.
Stay Local. Stay Safe. Stay Alive.
MA
Markymark Meridian (Thames Valley) South Today
Did you not go to school? If there are two names you should remember from being taught about the civil rights movement it would be Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks?
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I was at school in the 70s, I don't recall being taught anything about civil rights etc, such things were kept brushed under the carpet

By the time I made it to school in the 90s it was considered history. Going way off topic but we seemed to learn far more about American political history than British political history. I think the UK history I was taught was basically 1066, Tudors and Stewarts, Queen Victoria and the two World Wars.


WWII was within living adult memory of many of my teachers, I was born 18 years after it ended, but I grew up in an environment of it being talked about routinely on a daily basis. I also recall a German girl being viscously taunted at school, familiar behaviour, different victims.
AndrewPSSP, London Lite and Brekkie gave kudos
TR
trevormon London London

Even before the over-75 licence changes there has been a large drop in licences bought by the rest of the population. The most recent figures showed a drop of 82,000 licences in 5 months which equates to 200,000 a year. Not long ago the number of licences was increasing due to population growth and better enforcement.


OK, (a URL would be useful ?)


You can get the yearly numbers of TV licences held going back several years from here;
https://www.tvlicensing.co.uk/about/our-performance-AB6

The last BBC Annual report which contains licence fee numbers/income and how it is spent can be found on page 209 (not recommended as a bedtime read) https://downloads.bbc.co.uk/aboutthebbc/reports/annualreport/2018-19.pdf

The detailed figures for that recent 5 month period are a result of an FOI request:
https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/82-000-ditch-tv-licence-as-streaming-grows-m0v2hw5hg
CI
cityprod West Country (West) Spotlight
Vast majority


I don't think that's the case in the UK at all. Maybe in America, but in the UK, this event did not have the cultural resonance that it had in the US. Just because we know something, doesn't mean everybody or even the vast majority does.

Did you not go to school? If there are two names you should remember from being taught about the civil rights movement it would be Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks?

That said the point still stands - drama can be a very effective way of reaching an audience factual programmes wouldn't and informing an audience who may not be aware of the story of someone like Rosa Parks of her story. And beyond the content, filming across the UK can literally bring money to the regions too - not just from money spent during filming but also in future tourism.


I'm old enough for the civil rights movement to still have been fresh enough to not be considered history at that point. I was never taught about the civil rights movement in school, I learned about it outside of school. If it's been taught in schools more recently, then that's a good thing.
radiolistener and Ghost gave kudos
MA
Markymark Meridian (Thames Valley) South Today

Even before the over-75 licence changes there has been a large drop in licences bought by the rest of the population. The most recent figures showed a drop of 82,000 licences in 5 months which equates to 200,000 a year. Not long ago the number of licences was increasing due to population growth and better enforcement.


OK, (a URL would be useful ?)


You can get the yearly numbers of TV licences held going back several years from here;
https://www.tvlicensing.co.uk/about/our-performance-AB6

The last BBC Annual report which contains licence fee numbers/income and how it is spent can be found on page 209 (not recommended as a bedtime read) https://downloads.bbc.co.uk/aboutthebbc/reports/annualreport/2018-19.pdf

The detailed figures for that recent 5 month period are a result of an FOI request:
https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/82-000-ditch-tv-licence-as-streaming-grows-m0v2hw5hg


Thank you, I'll take a read. I'd assumed when the BBC said they had lost £120m because of CV19, they were referring to revenue, and not increased costs ? There might end up being a loss of revenue due to programme sales, but I wouldn't have expected that to decline sharply from day one of the lockdown ?

120m equates to 750k annual TV licence payments, but if we're only talking about since lockdown then are there 2 million plus extra non payments ? That's often the problem with Amol Rajan, he talks at a million miles an hour, without giving any meaningful context or detail.
RA
radiolistener
Vast majority


I don't think that's the case in the UK at all. Maybe in America, but in the UK, this event did not have the cultural resonance that it had in the US. Just because we know something, doesn't mean everybody or even the vast majority does.

Did you not go to school? If there are two names you should remember from being taught about the civil rights movement it would be Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks?

That said the point still stands - drama can be a very effective way of reaching an audience factual programmes wouldn't and informing an audience who may not be aware of the story of someone like Rosa Parks of her story. And beyond the content, filming across the UK can literally bring money to the regions too - not just from money spent during filming but also in future tourism.


Not at my school.
GeekyJames and Cusack gave kudos
CU
Cusack Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)

I don't think that's the case in the UK at all. Maybe in America, but in the UK, this event did not have the cultural resonance that it had in the US. Just because we know something, doesn't mean everybody or even the vast majority does.

Did you not go to school? If there are two names you should remember from being taught about the civil rights movement it would be Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks?

That said the point still stands - drama can be a very effective way of reaching an audience factual programmes wouldn't and informing an audience who may not be aware of the story of someone like Rosa Parks of her story. And beyond the content, filming across the UK can literally bring money to the regions too - not just from money spent during filming but also in future tourism.


Not at my school.


Nor mine in the mid 80s.
TR
trevormon London London

OK, (a URL would be useful ?)


You can get the yearly numbers of TV licences held going back several years from here;
https://www.tvlicensing.co.uk/about/our-performance-AB6

The last BBC Annual report which contains licence fee numbers/income and how it is spent can be found on page 209 (not recommended as a bedtime read) https://downloads.bbc.co.uk/aboutthebbc/reports/annualreport/2018-19.pdf

The detailed figures for that recent 5 month period are a result of an FOI request:
https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/82-000-ditch-tv-licence-as-streaming-grows-m0v2hw5hg


Thank you, I'll take a read. I'd assumed when the BBC said they had lost £120m because of CV19, they were referring to revenue, and not increased costs ? There might end up being a loss of revenue due to programme sales, but I wouldn't have expected that to decline sharply from day one of the lockdown ?

120m equates to 750k annual TV licence payments, but if we're only talking about since lockdown then are there 2 million plus extra non payments ? That's often the problem with Amol Rajan, he talks at a million miles an hour, without giving any meaningful context or detail.


Two thirds of the £120m was lost revenue from the 2 month postponement of charging for around 3 million over-75 licences. The remaining amount hasn't been broken down but includes foreign sales of BBC programmes that have been delayed, buying in extra programmes to fill the gaps etc.
AN
another_beauty
The Daily Mail states that many more job cuts are to be announced in news, however Politics Live will be saved, with one episode a week being cut. It also claims a high number of staff want to take voluntary redundancy.
NE
News96 Look North (Yorkshire)
An Announcement is due to land at 2:00pm.



MF
Matthew_Fieldhouse Central (West) Midlands Today


CM
cmthwtv West Country (East) Points West
The Andrew Neil Show dropped as BBC News unveils cuts https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-53416067

Quote:

The Andrew Neil Show will disappear from BBC schedules as part of cuts to the corporation's news operation.

The political discussion programme had already been off the air during the Covid-19 crisis and will not return. But the BBC said it was talking to Neil about a new BBC One interview show.

In total, 520 jobs will go, from a workforce of around 6,000 people.

That includes 450 job cuts that were announced as part of an £80m savings drive in January, and then put on hold.
Meanwhile, The Guardian has announced that it will cut 180 jobs, including 70 from editorial teams.

What next for Andrew Neil?

Neil has been one of the BBC's top political broadcasters over the past two decades on shows like This Week and Daily Politics.
The Andrew Neil Show began in autumn 2019 in the run-up to the general election and the UK's departure from the European Union. It included interviews with most party leaders, but Prime Minister Boris Johnson did not appear - leading the host to controversially deliver an on-air ultimatum.

Announcing the latest cuts, the BBC said: "We remain committed to Andrew Neil's in-depth interviews (as well as the Budget, US Election and other Specials).
"The Andrew Neil Show will not be returning but we're in discussions about a new interview series on BBC One."

Neil had previously told the Radio Times he feared he would become "surplus to requirements" as the BBC made cutbacks.
BBC media editor Amol Rajan said the former Sunday Times editor has been talking to other broadcasters.

One of Neil's former programmes, lunchtime TV show Politics Live, will return four days a week after being rested during the pandemic.

More than 100 MPs and peers recently wrote to the BBC, arguing that axing it permanently would "seriously harm the ability of the BBC to scrutinise and explain" politics.

Why are the cuts being made?

The BBC announced in 2016 that it needed to save £800m, with around £80m of that figure coming from News.

Just over £40m - around half of the savings required - has been found over the past four years.

In January, the corporation announced plans to close 450 jobs, as well as programmes like BBC Two's highly-regarded Victoria Derbyshire show.

The cuts were later postponed as the newsroom faced the demands of covering the coronavirus pandemic.

At the same time, the BBC delayed a decision to end free TV licences for the over-75s. That contributed to a further budget shortfall, meaning that the number of proposed job losses in news has increased by 70 posts.

A separate decision to cut 450 jobs in the BBC's regional newsrooms was announced earlier this month.

Which other programmes will be affected?

Most of the changes will take place behind the scenes.

The corporation's head of news, Fran Unsworth, said the BBC would concentrate on fewer stories, with journalists pooled in centralised teams, rather than working for specific programmes.

The BBC News Channel and BBC World will continue to share some output, as they have done during the Covid-19 crisis, although they will remain separate channels.

Radio 4 programme In Business will close, as will the Business Live page on the BBC News Website, while bespoke business news bulletins on the BBC News channel will be reduced.
Last edited by cmthwtv on 15 July 2020 2:33pm - 2 times in total

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