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Si-Co2,337 posts since 2 Oct 2003
Tyne Tees Look North (North East)
There were no official boundaries from what I can discern. An ITV company's area was determined by its transmitter footprint.


Were transmitter footprints significantly different in the VHF days? If viewers had become accustomed to one region then became officially or better served by a UHF relay of a neighbouring region, it’s possible they would prefer to stay with the original region, even if it meant retuning or repositioning their aerial.
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Riaz679 posts since 6 Jan 2016
Were transmitter footprints significantly different in the VHF days?


Yes, due to physics of radio propagation. During the years when both VHF and UHF TV broadcasting ran in parallel there were effectively two ITV regional maps - one for VHF and one for UHF.

Quote:
If viewers had become accustomed to one region then became officially or better served by a UHF relay of a neighbouring region, it’s possible they would prefer to stay with the original region, even if it meant retuning or repositioning their aerial.


Possibly. Also take into account houses with both a VHF and a UHF TV and how they could be showing ITV from two different regions.
Philheybrookbay27 posts since 5 Aug 2019
Westcountry Spotlight
Indeed. I think the Chairman of Westward, Peter Cadbury made a strong case for having the TWW/HTV West area bolted on, as at one point in the 60s, Exeter was declared part of the TWW region. Nothing came of it of course. Guess that was down the transmitter situation at the time.
Inspector Sands14,781 posts since 25 Aug 2004
Yes regions are only defined by transmitters, the priority is to cover as much of the country with as few transmitters as possible. The idea of putting different content on different transmitters is secondary.

That is reversed when it comes to satellite, because you can cover the whole country with a single transmission, but then they had to fudge the platform to match what terrestrial did
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noggin gave kudos
robertclark1251,588 posts since 13 Jan 2009
STV Central Reporting Scotland
Some regions, such as Tyne Tees, STV, and perhaps Border, were quite happy to concentrate on their own area, I think anyway. Others, most notably Yorkshire, were keen in the 1980s to expand their area, as mentioned by the fact their weather map featured Cleveland and South Durham.

If anything, STV, Border, and Tyne Tees seemed more cuddly and friendly, wheras Yorkshire were aggressive, and trying to claim what really wasn't theirs. The fact YTV didn't have in vision continuity also gives me a feeling of someone hiding behind a mask, waiting to pounce on someone elses territory.
Markymark8,195 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
There were no official boundaries from what I can discern. An ITV company's area was determined by its transmitter footprint.


Were transmitter footprints significantly different in the VHF days? If viewers had become accustomed to one region then became officially or better served by a UHF relay of a neighbouring region, it’s possible they would prefer to stay with the original region, even if it meant retuning or repositioning their aerial.


Yes, my own area (North Hampshie/West Berks) was firmly London in the VHF era, but with the advent of UHF became part of the ITV (and BBC) South region. However, as Crystal Palace UHF predated the local Hannington UHF, many remained on the weaker London UHF signals
noggin14,939 posts since 26 Jun 2001

That is reversed when it comes to satellite, because you can cover the whole country with a single transmission, but then they had to fudge the platform to match what terrestrial did


And now, with ad smart, advertisers (which, let's face it, are the prime motivator for ITV regionality on satellite these days) on Sky can target audiences without needing a channel to have multiple satellite variants - they can just pay Sky to cache their adverts and drop them in to demographically suitable homes invisibly. (Though I don't think ITV use it - C4 announced they will, as well as the BBC for customised trails?)
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Inspector Sands gave kudos
Markymark8,195 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
Wasn't it only changed once Eitshal UHF came on air, VHF never made it across to the north west of the highlands?


Yes, as discussed in here previously, NW Scotland only had BBC 1 on 405 lines until 1976 when BBC 2 and Grampian (together) finally arrived thanks to UHF

The ITA simply hadn't got round to expanding VHF coverage to that area by 1970, when the expansion of VHF was halted, to concentrate resources on UHF/625/Colour