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LTSC1980341 posts since 14 Nov 2009
BBC World News
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7DsNE-ktwGs
The first teaser for the soon to be re-launched Mega Channel in Greece.
The slogan MEGA όπως πάντα! (or Mega - as always)

Mega was the first private TV channel to launch in Greece way back in 1989 however after financial issues, they went out of business and left a lot of their employees unpaid.

The owner of ONE TV in Greece bought the branding, logo and programme library last year and is preparing for a re-launch.

Looks like Mega reused "Mega Mou" branding after relaunch.
Ident:

Promo:

"Stay At Home" bumper:
@ltsc1980
elmarko1,131 posts since 27 Jul 2010
STV Central Reporting Scotland
I had no idea where to post this question/some comments, but since I've watched a lot of videos and fallen in love with German TV presentation recently it can all go here.

I'm a bit obsessed with the German third channels. The idea that those areas can maintain a full schedule every day and do some really good stuff while contributing to ARD as well is pretty cool. And I'll wager the system's overall budget is less than the BBC's. Which leads to a question: How does this style of broadcasting go so well there, whereas here we don't really have regional channels covering larger areas? We went for the city-style option which was always going to fail here, or we have regional inserts on the national channels.

But like, this seems to me to be comparable to BBC North West or Granada running their own channel and I'm just fascinated by how that works there. The larger area makes it work, I guess? If you were broadcasting to all of Manchester, Cumbria, Lancashire etc, would that work? Or is this a case of a system that has just developed naturally in these countries and "emulating" just wouldn't work?

Also: How come the idea of having the presenters in the studio before the news and a clock etc come to be so prevalent there (and in other European countries) but we never went for it.

Lockdown does funny things to your brain and this is the result.
TheMike158 posts since 12 Jan 2019
Central (East) East Midlands Today
I had no idea where to post this question/some comments, but since I've watched a lot of videos and fallen in love with German TV presentation recently it can all go here.

I'm a bit obsessed with the German third channels. The idea that those areas can maintain a full schedule every day and do some really good stuff while contributing to ARD as well is pretty cool. And I'll wager the system's overall budget is less than the BBC's. Which leads to a question: How does this style of broadcasting go so well there, whereas here we don't really have regional channels covering larger areas? We went for the city-style option which was always going to fail here, or we have regional inserts on the national channels.

But like, this seems to me to be comparable to BBC North West or Granada running their own channel and I'm just fascinated by how that works there. The larger area makes it work, I guess? If you were broadcasting to all of Manchester, Cumbria, Lancashire etc, would that work? Or is this a case of a system that has just developed naturally in these countries and "emulating" just wouldn't work?

Also: How come the idea of having the presenters in the studio before the news and a clock etc come to be so prevalent there (and in other European countries) but we never went for it.

Lockdown does funny things to your brain and this is the result.

Germany is a federal nation with the third channels serving the federal states (Bundesländer) with news and information relevant to local viewers.

As a result of the Government structure, some issues relating to politics, health, education, infrastructure, even aspects of consumer law are done at a state level rather than national level, meaning these channels are best placed to report on them. Some states also have very distinct customs and culture as well as dialect that can not be fully reflected on a national channel.

In some ways, it may be better to compare them with the TV services in devolved administrations of the UK rather than the English regions.
rdd3,535 posts since 21 Jun 2001
It has a lot to do with the system as it evolved post WW2. Germany was divided into zones by the Allied powers and each zone started its own broadcaster, which was the beginning of the process. In West Germany after 1949 there was then a desire then not to have a centralised State broadcaster and so Broadcasting was made a competency of the states, the federal government having no responsibility. The states, including all of them, can jointly create public broadcasters which is why there are some broadcasters covering more than one state. ZDF and Deutschlandradio were created by all of the states collectively (but not by the federal government), while ARD is the trade association of the regional public broadcasters.

East Germany had a more conventional state broadcaster (DFF) but they moved over to the Western devolved system after unification (and a shortish transitional period when DFF acted as the ARD member for the eastern states until new regional broadcasters were established)