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davidhorman2,366 posts since 8 Mar 2005
Channel Channel Islands
I miss the days of Blackadder and the like where no-one cared if you could hear the audience coughing between jokes or that the actors sometimes had to wait for the laughter to die down before they could finish their line. They do too much editing these days. I remember one reviewer lamenting that that sitcom with Simon Farnaby was great when he watched it live, but was awful and flat after the editors had got their hands on it.
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Rich Tea690 posts since 16 Apr 2017
Anglia (West) Look East
I miss the days of Blackadder and the like where no-one cared if you could hear the audience coughing between jokes or that the actors sometimes had to wait for the laughter to die down before they could finish their line. They do too much editing these days. I remember one reviewer lamenting that that sitcom with Simon Farnaby was great when he watched it live, but was awful and flat after the editors had got their hands on it.


Yes, there are comedies from way back where you can actually hear one specific person in the audience guffawing loudly above everyone else and that actually adds to the overall mirth in itself. What is the point of any studio audience in attendance if those that edit afterwards simply turn their reaction, or lack of reaction, into nothing more than a generic laughter soundtrack that might as well have been out of the can in the first place.
Steve Williams2,997 posts since 1 Aug 2008
One thought that went through my mind on the afternoon of Sept 11 2001, was surely disaster movies
will never been shown again, never mind made !


Well, this is true enough - BBC1 showed Deep Impact at Christmas 2000 and then showed it again in primetime about a week before 9/11, and I remember my friend saying that at least they'd got their money's worth out of it given they'd never show it again. And they showed it in primetime again within about six months.

They really loved Deep Impact at the time actually, four primetime screenings within two and a half years on BBC1 - https://genome.ch.bbc.co.uk/search/0/20?order=asc&q=%22deep+impact%22#search
davidhorman2,366 posts since 8 Mar 2005
Channel Channel Islands

Yes, there are comedies from way back where you can actually hear one specific person in the audience guffawing loudly above everyone else and that actually adds to the overall mirth in itself.


That often seemed to happen to Tony Hancock. There's one episode where there's an absolute screecher in the audience, and at one point he stops to say, "Madam, please." (in good humour). In fact there are quite a few wall-breaking moments in Hancock's Half Hour, which I had previously thought was a modern phenomenon (e.g. Mrs Brown's Boys ).

The other one I'm reminded of is an Eddie Izzard gig where someone starts hooting with laughter and he has to ask "Where were you in the first half?!"
Hatton Cross3,430 posts since 4 Jan 2003
Central (West) Midlands Today
Bill Maher has the same occasional problem.
There is a woman who is in his audience of Real Time, seemingly every few weeks, and has this really noticable squeeling loud giggly laugh.

Co-incidentally, she laughs at some gags that don't really land with the rest of the audience - and, probably believing it's done deliberatly, once Bill once called her out by looking at her and said in a semi-serious manner "This lady needs to settle down - this is a comdy programme"
Readers are warned that this post contains some flash photography
Inspector Sands14,483 posts since 25 Aug 2004
Seth Myers has an item called A Closer Look which has its own title sting, there's a a very distinctive female laugh on that. Always wondered if that was on the sting itself and blow me when he did an episode without an audience the other week she was still there!

The Radio 4 panel show The Unbelievable Truth has the same thing on its title music too
Inspector Sands14,483 posts since 25 Aug 2004

Yes, there are comedies from way back where you can actually hear one specific person in the audience guffawing loudly above everyone else and that actually adds to the overall mirth in itself.

Probably to do with where the audience mics are positioned. Reminds me of a thing I heard about Crackerjack where some scouts in the audience worked out where the mic was near them and started loudly swearing into it.


Back to Blackadder, the worst thing about it is the shrieking laughter during the Flash heart scenes in series 4. So cringy I can't bear to watch it
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Hatton Cross3,430 posts since 4 Jan 2003
Central (West) Midlands Today
Isn't the Flasheart 'audience roar' a cross series 'in-joke' though?

IIRC In series 2, a scene with Rik took a lot of takes, and by the end of it the audience were getting naturally bored of hearing the same line and were told to put on false laughter until the actors nailed it - leading to the overreactional sheriks and gaffaws from the studio audience (one presumed egged on by Rik himself).

It seems that overblow audience reaction to his 'jokes' and appearences then followed Flasheart across the series generational divides.
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JasonB5,287 posts since 20 Sep 2003
London London

Yes, there are comedies from way back where you can actually hear one specific person in the audience guffawing loudly above everyone else


Philip Schofield loves boasting to Friends actors when they appear on this morning that you can hear his laugh in one episode he attended.

From 5:50
Have you washed your hands?