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Juicy Joe1,553 posts since 25 Dec 2001
Central (West) Midlands Today
Didn't the old graphics simply have a gradient fade in the same spot so that the cut-off was less noticeable?

The cloud overlay does appear in full with the MeteroGroup graphics when doing the forecast for something like more than 48 hours in the future, so it could just be a case that the more-accurate weather modelling stops at that cut-off point when doing the coming day etc, and there's less of an effort to cover it up than before? I agree that it doesn't look fantastic, although on the whole the graphics have certainly grown on me since their launch.


The old graphics had no cloud overlay - merely darker shading on the map - similar to ITV now - which made it much easier to see what was going on and where the cloud actually was. Now, it is extremely difficult to judge cloud from snow from fog from ice/frost. I thought by now that the BBC would have been removing elements from their map such as the cloud overlay to make it more understandable, rather than adding to them by sticking "Liverpool" on the map.

I agree, the vertical line cut off of the cloud overlay by the weather presenter does look poor.
chris4,289 posts since 6 Jul 2005
Granada North West Today
Didn't the old graphics simply have a gradient fade in the same spot so that the cut-off was less noticeable?

The cloud overlay does appear in full with the MeteroGroup graphics when doing the forecast for something like more than 48 hours in the future, so it could just be a case that the more-accurate weather modelling stops at that cut-off point when doing the coming day etc, and there's less of an effort to cover it up than before? I agree that it doesn't look fantastic, although on the whole the graphics have certainly grown on me since their launch.


The old graphics had no cloud overlay - merely darker shading on the map - similar to ITV now - which made it much easier to see what was going on and where the cloud actually was. Now, it is extremely difficult to judge cloud from snow from fog from ice/frost. I thought by now that the BBC would have been removing elements from their map such as the cloud overlay to make it more understandable, rather than adding to them by sticking "Liverpool" on the map.

I agree, the vertical line cut off of the cloud overlay by the weather presenter does look poor.


Without a doubt ITV’s forecasts are clearer.
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scottishtv1,788 posts since 6 Nov 2001
STV Central Reporting Scotland
He left the BBC in 2016 and joined the Met Office as an onscreen forecaster. As far as I know, he is not contracted anywhere else other than the Met Office.

His appearance online isn't new. He's been a regular on the Met Office YouTube forecasts (updated multiple times a day) since late 2016. The Met Office presenters also do good "10 Day Trend" videos, and a relaxed, interactive weekly live stream called "The Weather Studio" too.


The Met Office YouTube channel is worth a sub. Scotland also gets it's own YouTube channel and forecasts too, for some reason.
Rich Tea608 posts since 16 Apr 2017
Anglia (West) Look East
BBC Weather now has "Liverpool" labelled on their National map - just in case we didn't know where it was. This is new since the start of 2020. This means that Northern Ireland is now mostly covered by "Belfast", as is most of Wales by "Birmingham". How this improves the clarity of the weather presentation, is questionable



I don't want an atlas, I want a forecast.

Please tell me there aren't people so ignorant that they cannot work out where they are living on a map of the UK without being told like children every time.
Inspector Sands14,274 posts since 25 Aug 2004
Surely the city names are mostly there for when there's weather obscuring the map?

Last weekend for example the forecasts were one big blob of rain and wind covering the UK, pointless without labels pointing out what's underneath