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itsrobert6,439 posts since 23 Mar 2001
Granada North West Today
As expected, the Oscars special wasn’t particularly popular with viewers, around 100k down on standard levels I think.

Quote:
Monday’s edition of GMB, hosted by Piers Morgan and Susanna Reid, attracted an average audience of just 670,000 viewers between 6.00am – 9.00am, with an 18.8% audience share. This is down on what the ITV breakfast show had been getting in recent weeks.

BBC’s Breakfast benefited as its ratings went from the average of 1.4 million viewers to an impressive 1.64 million on Monday, taking a hefty 45% audience share.


— ATV Today

So for the additional cost involved in comparison to a normal show, the result was ultimately handing BBC Breakfast a larger audience.

I'll never understand why broadcasters think we're all so bothered about the Oscars and the likes. All it warrants is a quick mention in the entertainment slot at best. Is it just an excuse for the presenters to rub shoulders with A-list celebrities? I guess so. It doesn't seem to do them any credit though as viewing figures go down.
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Cusack58 posts since 6 Mar 2018
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
As expected, the Oscars special wasn’t particularly popular with viewers, around 100k down on standard levels I think.

Quote:
Monday’s edition of GMB, hosted by Piers Morgan and Susanna Reid, attracted an average audience of just 670,000 viewers between 6.00am – 9.00am, with an 18.8% audience share. This is down on what the ITV breakfast show had been getting in recent weeks.

BBC’s Breakfast benefited as its ratings went from the average of 1.4 million viewers to an impressive 1.64 million on Monday, taking a hefty 45% audience share.


— ATV Today

So for the additional cost involved in comparison to a normal show, the result was ultimately handing BBC Breakfast a larger audience.

I'll never understand why broadcasters think we're all so bothered about the Oscars and the likes. All it warrants is a quick mention in the entertainment slot at best. Is it just an excuse for the presenters to rub shoulders with A-list celebrities? I guess so. It doesn't seem to do them any credit though as viewing figures go down.


It seemed a misguided idea when it was announced, but even more so after the weather dominated weekend that went before it, for the show to be mostly about The Oscars was silly.
JCB2,077 posts since 21 Sep 2004
"Sorry I'm late... Piers Morgan was ranting"

said nobody ever.

Except the presenters of the regional news opts. Rolling Eyes


My point stands that at in the mornings a lot of people do rely on TV and radio for their routine. That's why programmes traditionally have very regular timings. The Big Breakfast was a very good example of this, same features at the same time every day.

You can't do that with GMB


Apparently people are fine at every other time of the day but in the mornings we're all idiots who need to be told what to do and when via the running order of a tv or radio show. How did non radio listeners cope before 1983 with absolutely no way of knowing what the hell time it was between 6 and 9 am? It Just goes to show how far technology has advanced in such a relatively short period of time. Now on a morning, rather than curling up in a ball on the floor and sobbing uncontrollably because I don't know what to do next, I can just look at may wall and bam! 7:10 time to get dressed. Thankyou magical time telling device.
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Steve Williams2,973 posts since 1 Aug 2008
My point stands that at in the mornings a lot of people do rely on TV and radio for their routine. That's why programmes traditionally have very regular timings. The Big Breakfast was a very good example of this, same features at the same time every day.

You can't do that with GMB


That's true enough. You simply can't expect people to sit around waiting for the things they're interested in to appear at that time of the morning. When I get up I know I can see the regional news (specifically the travel), the headlines and the sport on Breakfast, which I what I want to see. If they don't happen in the time I'm watching, I can't wait for them - I'm leaving the house. And if that happens all the time, I'm going to stop watching because it's not giving me what I want.

It's funny you should mention The Big Breakfast because in Morning Glory Ruth Wrigley, one of the Editors, talks about Johnny Vaughan, who she hired. She says that in Vaughan's early days when she was there, Johnny would do pretty much what he was told, but as Vaughan became more famous and she left to be replaced by a string of more junior producers, he would increasingly do what he wanted and derail the running order for a flight of whimsy. She says it made for irritating viewing, because you'd see big stars in the house waiting to be interviewed, but you wouldn't be able to see the interviews themselves because Johnny had been talking too much and they were massively overrunning, and by the time they got to them you'd already left the house.

There is the opportunity for some flexibility in the morning but the vast majority of the audience only watch it for a short while and if stuff is continually being deferred, they'll stop watching it because they're not being given what they want.

It seemed a misguided idea when it was announced, but even more so after the weather dominated weekend that went before it, for the show to be mostly about The Oscars was silly.


Yes, unfortunate for them that probably one of the biggest human interest news stories happened that weekend. Things like bad weather are always going to be valuable for breakfast telly because it's at times like that people who don't regularly watch breakfast TV tend to tune in, either because people are stuck at home or because it personally affects them in a way most news stories don't, so they're the bread and butter of shows like this. Hence Breakfast's figures skyrocketing. And of course Good Morning Britain were totally unable to take advantage of this because they were committed to doing it all from LA.

I mean, it's bad luck and they presumably didn't want to waste the OB and all the planning they'd done for it, plus they had their main presenters there and only a skeleton team in the studio. But that's the chance you take when you decide to do the entire show as an OB, you can get overtaken by events.
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Inspector Sands14,312 posts since 25 Aug 2004

Apparently people are fine at every other time of the day but in the mornings we're all idiots who need to be told what to do and when via the running order of a tv or radio show. How did non radio listeners cope before 1983 with absolutely no way of knowing what the hell time it was between 6 and 9 am?

It Just goes to show how far technology has advanced in such a relatively short period of time. Now on a morning, rather than curling up in a ball on the floor and sobbing uncontrollably because I don't know what to do next, I can just look at may wall and bam! 7:10 time to get dressed. Thankyou magical time telling device.

You're embarrassing yourself by not understanding the very simple concept.


Of course there are clocks, but if you've got the TV or radio on in the morning it's the background and soundtrack to your morning routine. Most of the time you're not really concentrating on it - you're getting yourself ready, getting the kids ready, shoving food and coffee in your mouth. You hear or see the same features at the same time and they become part of your routine.


I started a new job a few years ago and started listening to Chris Evans on my commute, after a few days I noticed that when he did the on this day feature I was usually always at a certain traffic lights and when he spoke to a child I was always approaching a certain roundabout. That became my guide as to how late I was, if he was speaking to a child and I hadn't got to that roundabout I was late. If Moria had finished the news I was very late. I didn't care about the actual time, didn't need to

When I was at 6th form college I knew I had to be out the house to catch the bus when the showbiz news ('The Crunch'?) started on The Big Breakfast

These days it's the end of Baby Jake... Rolling Eyes
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DJGM2,707 posts since 4 Jan 2003
Granada North West Today

When I was at 6th form college I knew I had to be out the house to catch the bus when the showbiz news ('The Crunch'?)
started on The Big Breakfast


"Snap Cackle & Pop" was the showbiz news segment at (IIRC) about 07:45-07:50-ish. While "The Crunch" was Zig & Zag's segment.
"The Not-So-Late-Show with Greg Mitchell" will hopefully return in some form somewhere soon ... but it seems, not on Roch Valley Radio.

Stay tuned . . .
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Brekkie33,406 posts since 4 Jan 2003 Recently warned
HTV Wales Wales Today

Yes, unfortunate for them that probably one of the biggest human interest news stories happened that weekend. Things like bad weather are always going to be valuable for breakfast telly because it's at times like that people who don't regularly watch breakfast TV tend to tune in, either because people are stuck at home or because it personally affects them in a way most news stories don't, so they're the bread and butter of shows like this. Hence Breakfast's figures skyrocketing. And of course Good Morning Britain were totally unable to take advantage of this because they were committed to doing it all from LA.

I mean, it's bad luck and they presumably didn't want to waste the OB and all the planning they'd done for it, plus they had their main presenters there and only a skeleton team in the studio. But that's the chance you take when you decide to do the entire show as an OB, you can get overtaken by events.

Nothing wrong with choice though - the Oscar's were a bit uneventful this year but usually the breakfast coverage is sufficient to most and the way most people consume it. Agree though little value in hosting the show out there, but if they've got the budget why not.
It's great that everybody gets sarcasm.
Steve Williams2,973 posts since 1 Aug 2008
Nothing wrong with choice though - the Oscar's were a bit uneventful this year but usually the breakfast coverage is sufficient to most and the way most people consume it. Agree though little value in hosting the show out there, but if they've got the budget why not.


Well, of course Breakfast covered the Oscars as well, but third in the running order after the weather and the Coronavirus, which is probably about where it came in the interest of the audience on Monday. They had live reports from there but it didn't dominate the entire show in the way it would do on Good Morning Britain when they were anchoring it from there. I don't think it's of as much interest to the general audience as they thought it was. Fair enough it was offering choice, but the ratings suggest it was a bit of a turn-off.

This is a bit of a crass comparison maybe but I remember watching The Big Breakfast the day after Dunblane which stayed pretty much to the same running order as usual, they extended the news bulletins a bit but other than that it was the same old Big Breakfast mix. Now you can say that given the news was so grim it was quite nice to have something a bit lighter, but it just came across as really uncomfortable, there was a massive elephant in the room and everything just fell flat. It wasn't very pleasant viewing at all. I know The Big Breakfast as a whole was in a bit of a state at the time and it might have been better if the show was in better shape, but the fact is, there was a big story there dominating people's thoughts, and just ploughing on with the planned features seemingly ignoring it just looks weird.

As I say, best laid plans and all that, and if we hadn't had the bad weather then it probably would have been OK. But there was a bloody big story there and I don't think it did it any favours by just knocking it off in a few minutes in the hour and then carrying on with Oscar chat. I appreciate it was a big OB with everyone there but there is always going to be a risk when you decide to do a show like this as a OB for the entire show that something comes up. I mean you can take the flypast the other month on Breakfast as an example, when they did the whole show as an OB, I would have thought that if a major story had broken that morning they'd have been flexible enough to change plans and accommodate it fully. Whereas in this instance it looked like they had "five minutes from London on other news" in the running order and weren't prepared to deviate from that regardless of what that other news was.
natoswald122 posts since 24 Feb 2016
Did GMB have the 30 minute bulletin at 6am on Monday then covering news from the studio, or was it all done on location from 6am through to 9am?

All on location from 6-9am. They went to
Charlotte for a news bulletin at 6.10, but that was it other than headlines at the top of the hour.
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