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dosxuk4,472 posts since 22 Oct 2005
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
Does anyone know how it works for broadcasters if events they have the rights for get cancelled. Do they get a refund on the rights.

Why would they get a refund? They'd have the rights for when the event is rescheduled. Given the detail in rights deals I'd expect there to be a clause that covers events being postponed due to circumstances outside the organisers control.

What about if they not and are simply cancelled and never held.


How often does a standalone event with broadcasters paying rights for it actually get cancelled though? I suspect it's rare enough that there isn't a single policy.

I'm not counting individual events as part of a package, or repeating events, as that opens many other avenues of compensation. Take the Chinese GP for instance - firstly, it's not cancelled, just postponed (even though it'll be impossible to put back in the calendar as it's already too full), but F1 have loads of additional things they can do to compensate a broadcaster - give additional access, give additional resources at other events, or give access to promo events that aren't normally included. Plus the broadcaster probably only pays for the season rather than xx race weekends.
Neil Jones6,192 posts since 23 Dec 2001
Central (West) Midlands Today
There will probably be a force majeure/act of God condition that basically boils down to not their problem should an event not run due to conditions beyond their control. If they'd gone off and deliberately spread a virus so that the F1 race couldn't run, that's a entirely different thing.

Most events that get called off will eventually go ahead. Football matches get rescheduled (although the advent of undersoil heating negates but doesn't exclude the possibility), horse races get rescheduled (as infamously happened with the Grand National in 1993) and music concerts where the singer has lost their voice gets rescheduled too.

Must admit I can't really think of any standalone event that was due to be televised and then never went ahead. The closest example to the principle was when Michael Jackson died in 2009 about two weeks before he was due to start his 'This Is It' tour, tooted as the music event to end all music events. And it never happened.
BM11
London London
There will probably be a force majeure/act of God condition that basically boils down to not their problem should an event not run due to conditions beyond their control. If they'd gone off and deliberately spread a virus so that the F1 race couldn't run, that's a entirely different thing.

Most events that get called off will eventually go ahead. Football matches get rescheduled (although the advent of undersoil heating negates but doesn't exclude the possibility), horse races get rescheduled (as infamously happened with the Grand National in 1993) and music concerts where the singer has lost their voice gets rescheduled too.

Must admit I can't really think of any standalone event that was due to be televised and then never went ahead. The closest example to the principle was when Michael Jackson died in 2009 about two weeks before he was due to start his 'This Is It' tour, tooted as the music event to end all music events. And it never happened.

I don't expect the chinese grand prix to go ahead this year.
dosxuk4,472 posts since 22 Oct 2005
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
There will probably be a force majeure/act of God condition that basically boils down to not their problem should an event not run due to conditions beyond their control. If they'd gone off and deliberately spread a virus so that the F1 race couldn't run, that's a entirely different thing.

Most events that get called off will eventually go ahead. Football matches get rescheduled (although the advent of undersoil heating negates but doesn't exclude the possibility), horse races get rescheduled (as infamously happened with the Grand National in 1993) and music concerts where the singer has lost their voice gets rescheduled too.

Must admit I can't really think of any standalone event that was due to be televised and then never went ahead. The closest example to the principle was when Michael Jackson died in 2009 about two weeks before he was due to start his 'This Is It' tour, tooted as the music event to end all music events. And it never happened.

I don't expect the chinese grand prix to go ahead this year.


Nobody does. There's no time left in the season to slot it in.

But broadcasters have rights to the whole season, not an individual race, and I'd be surprised if the contact is worded such that they get a specific number of races. And even then, a race weekend can be cancelled all the way up till the race start.
BM11
London London
There will probably be a force majeure/act of God condition that basically boils down to not their problem should an event not run due to conditions beyond their control. If they'd gone off and deliberately spread a virus so that the F1 race couldn't run, that's a entirely different thing.

Most events that get called off will eventually go ahead. Football matches get rescheduled (although the advent of undersoil heating negates but doesn't exclude the possibility), horse races get rescheduled (as infamously happened with the Grand National in 1993) and music concerts where the singer has lost their voice gets rescheduled too.

Must admit I can't really think of any standalone event that was due to be televised and then never went ahead. The closest example to the principle was when Michael Jackson died in 2009 about two weeks before he was due to start his 'This Is It' tour, tooted as the music event to end all music events. And it never happened.

I don't expect the chinese grand prix to go ahead this year.


Nobody does. There's no time left in the season to slot it in.

But broadcasters have rights to the whole season, not an individual race, and I'd be surprised if the contact is worded such that they get a specific number of races. And even then, a race weekend can be cancelled all the way up till the race start.

With the news that a village in Vietnam is in lockdown over the virus the Vietnamese grand prix looks in real danger as well.
robertclark1251,509 posts since 13 Jan 2009
STV Central Reporting Scotland
Two events on the world sevens rugby series, Singapore, and Hong Kong, have been moved to October from April. This means a three month gap between the USA event, and the event in London. In terms of TV coverage, not a great problem for Sky, as these were, in the main, overnight or early morning, and at least they will still take place.
Brekkie33,944 posts since 4 Jan 2003
HTV Wales Wales Today
Eurosport or nowhere I imagine. Other than the Fiamond League meetings most of their events are low down the pecking order now - the British Champs tend to be more of a red button affair now.
Stay Home. Protect the NHS. Save Lives.
BM11
London London
This is the result of the IOC sellout. Without guaranteed wall to wall athletics on BBC ONE for the latter days of the Olympics the whole product is diminished.

Athletics will still get wall to wall olympics coverage - i doubt much will not be shown on bbc one or the red button channel live - its everything else that misses out more.

Through with how cornovirus is spreading who knows if they will be a 2020 olympics or if team GB compete in it.
Last edited by BM11 on 13 February 2020 7:17pm - 4 times in total