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Inspector Sands14,142 posts since 25 Aug 2004
I wish other ITV companies put their archive oddities online in the way Channel do.

Thing is that there aren't really any other ITV companies and within England and Wales the main archives have long been merged into ITV Archive. The only people in the regions who will deal with archive footage will be doing so for the daily news programmes


I suppose Channel being late to the ITV party, being quite remote and not having any network archive as such means they've kept some autonomy. Plus having recently moved premises and presumably streamlined their holdings they probably uncovered some forgotten stuff in the process.


As mentioned, STV put some interesting stuff up on YouTube, as do Thames. The latter do a lot of topical posting, for example they recently had a clip of a 1970s Thomas Cook shop
Whataday10,453 posts since 13 Sep 2001
HTV Wales Wales Today
I wish other ITV companies put their archive oddities online in the way Channel do.

Thing is that there aren't really any other ITV companies and within England and Wales the main archives have long been merged into ITV Archive. The only people in the regions who will deal with archive footage will be doing so for the daily news programmes


Actually ITV Wales donated its archive (including TWW and HTV) to the National Library of Wales in order to preserve it. The Library is in the process of restoring and digitising 250,000 items (funded by a Welsh Assembly grant). The aim is to have a fully digitised library accessible to the public (but ITV retains commercial rights).

The ITV Wales archive has a YouTube channel which uploads footage of a similar ilk to the Thames one:



They also occasionally upload clips showing the results of restoration:



Quote:
The HTV Wales archive is a significant record of Welsh popular culture, politics and history captured on both film and video and it constitutes a large part of the Screen and Sound Archive. An archive of that size and age will have an assortment of conservation challenges, especially in the area of restoration. By far the most common problem with old tape is Sticky-shed syndrome (SSS) or hydrolysis. SSS is symptomatic of the breakdown of the tapes’ polyester binder due to absorption of moisture.

The tell-tale squealing of the tape as it passes over the playhead and the accumulation of dirty deposits upon the guide and playhead indicate a tape has SSS. A tape with SSS will, amongst other issues, exhibit ‘crabbing’, i.e. the moving from side to side of the moving image, and if not treated continued playback could further damage the tape.

So how do we restore that believed lost episode of ‘Gwesty Gwirion’? The answer may surprise you! The standard practice is to bake the tape at low temperatures for relatively long periods of time, such as 130 °F to 140 °F (54 to 60 °C). Strictly speaking we don’t ’bake’ our tapes but instead use a commercial food dehydrator that removes all moisture from the tape pack. How long we do this to the tape will depend on the severity of the SSS; up to a week we’ve discovered is time enough. We have been successful with the majority of the tapes that have undergone the process, with many lost gems brought back from the brink of oblivion.


I found that interesting as I previously thought that sort of tape damage was irreversible.

The relative ease with which ITV Wales can access its archive means we get some very good archive-based programmes. Most recently Wales at War which draws on archive interviews with WWII survivors along with new footage.
Last edited by Whataday on 27 September 2019 7:57am - 2 times in total
Markymark7,469 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today


By 1984 the move to 1" C-format was almost complete.


Although I think Quad was still being used to playout stuff that was originally mastered on Quad?

I remember 1985 watching a episode of Spike Milligan's Q series fall off the air, with characteristic Quad style artefacts. They attempted to restore the broadcast from the point of failure twice before CA David Allen said 'we' re going to have throw in the towel on Spike'

As James mentioned, you'd often see TK failures in the 80s too
Last edited by Markymark on 27 September 2019 8:06am
bluecortina890 posts since 26 Jul 2012


By 1984 the move to 1" C-format was almost complete.


Although I think Quad was still being used to playout stuff that was originally mastered on Quad?

I remember 1985 watching a episode of Spike Milligan's Q series fall off the air, with characteristic Quad style artefacts. They attempted to restore the broadcast from the point of failure twice before CA David Allen said 'we' re going to have throw in the towel on Spike'

As James mentioned, you'd often see TK failures in the 80s too


Yes. And even later if you consider things like ACR machines. I can still remember Quad being used certainly in 1985 but by that date things were moving forward with great speed.
noggin14,679 posts since 26 Jun 2001


By 1984 the move to 1" C-format was almost complete.


Although I think Quad was still being used to playout stuff that was originally mastered on Quad?


Yes - and until relatively recently for transfers.

AIUI the BBC no longer own a single Quad 2" VTR (at least one that works) - and their 2" archive is now at the BFI?
bluecortina890 posts since 26 Jul 2012


By 1984 the move to 1" C-format was almost complete.


Although I think Quad was still being used to playout stuff that was originally mastered on Quad?


Yes - and until relatively recently for transfers.

AIUI the BBC no longer own a single Quad 2" VTR (at least one that works) - and their 2" archive is now at the BFI?


I gave Windmill Road an AVR2 headwheel panel to hopefully help them out. Didn’t get any sort of thank you. Very rude.
AidanLunn9 posts since 17 Oct 2017
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)


By 1984 the move to 1" C-format was almost complete.


Although I think Quad was still being used to playout stuff that was originally mastered on Quad?

I remember 1985 watching a episode of Spike Milligan's Q series fall off the air, with characteristic Quad style artefacts. They attempted to restore the broadcast from the point of failure twice before CA David Allen said 'we' re going to have throw in the towel on Spike'

As James mentioned, you'd often see TK failures in the 80s too


I think a fair few ITV companies went through a project of dubbing/transferring their entire Quad archive to 1" C VT in the late 80s, then disposing of the Quad VTs, therefore leaving copies of programmes made on Quad only survivng as 1" C-type copies once the time came for digitisation.
james-20015,626 posts since 13 Sep 2015
Central (East) East Midlands Today
As James mentioned, you'd often see TK failures in the 80s too


There's a quite infamous one on YouTube from around Jan/Feb 1985 of the film from an episode of Star Trek snapping on air!

The Meldrum Private Parts had one from even later, as it was preceeded by the COW ident, of a Jimmy Savile PIF beginning with a telecine fault (with the frame line in the middle of the screen, and a lot of jittering).
Markymark7,469 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
As James mentioned, you'd often see TK failures in the 80s too


There's a quite infamous one on YouTube from around Jan/Feb 1985 of the film from an episode of Star Trek snapping on air!

The Meldrum Private Parts had one from even later, as it was preceeded by the COW ident, of a Jimmy Savile PIF beginning with a telecine fault (with the frame line in the middle of the screen, and a lot of jittering).


There was one on You Tube from TSW of a bit of fluff getting in the film gate of an episode of Space 1999, and Judy Spiers making a joke that they would attempt to remove the giant branch that was obscuring the image. All done very slickly without the ums and ahs and stating the bleeding obvious every 15 seconds like we get today. Unfortunately it seems to have been removed due to copyright issues