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Brekkie32,016 posts since 4 Jan 2003
HTV Wales Wales Today
I have seen it described more than once on the news this morning as the "worst case scenario" without any reference to the serious doubts about this, which is disappointing.

Also no definition of what the"worse case" actually is. Surely the position we're in now isn't the "best case".
I preferred the internet when it had a sense of humour.
cityprod1,982 posts since 3 Oct 2005
Westcountry Spotlight
I have seen it described more than once on the news this morning as the "worst case scenario" without any reference to the serious doubts about this, which is disappointing.

Also no definition of what the"worse case" actually is. Surely the position we're in now isn't the "best case".


The so-called "clean brexit", otherwise known as the no-deal brexit, is always gonna be the worst case scenario. The position were in now is bad, continued uncertainty is never good for an economy, but the no-deal brexit is going to tank everything for a long time, and we've seen from Japan just how long it can take for an economy to actually recover from a serious tanking.

When it comes to this whole situation, some of the best coverage I've seen of this has come from non-UK news sources. RTE in Ireland and ABC in Australia in particular have come out with some of the better pieces overall, and previously, RTE's News2Day had a wonderful explainer of Brexit which explained it much better than 3 years of coverage on BBC News ever has.
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Inspector Sands13,831 posts since 25 Aug 2004
Yep, foreign takes on the subject have been both the most honest and concise. Looking in from the outside is always good, but they don't have to worry about balance or offending supporters of one 'side'. They also explain the background and current situation assuming their readers are coming from a position of total ignorance on the subject

However because they;re honest they're often the most bleak in outlook. I remember the term 'economic suicide' being used by Stephen Colbert the week after the vote

John Oliver's done a couple of Brexit explainers which are excellent : https://youtu.be/fyVz5vgqBhE
and his explainer about Boris Johnson was also great https://youtu.be/dXyO_MC9g3k
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Mr Q714 posts since 17 Apr 2003
BBC World News
When it comes to this whole situation, some of the best coverage I've seen of this has come from non-UK news sources. RTE in Ireland and ABC in Australia in particular have come out with some of the better pieces overall, and previously, RTE's News2Day had a wonderful explainer of Brexit which explained it much better than 3 years of coverage on BBC News ever has.

I'm responding with some trepidation here -- acknowledging this isn't strictly about presentation, but about news media coverage.

My observation is that British media tends to treat Brexit principally as a domestic political drama - the dynamics of what is happening on the EU side is of less interest than what is happening in Westminster. And thinking about the day-to-day news cycle, I can see why: there is considerable turmult and volatility in British politics (within parties, between the government and the parliament, comings and goings in cabinet), which provides a surfeit of content for media outlets. By comparison, there are far fewer shocks and controversies on a day-to-day basis in Brussels. Against the backdrop of Westminster, the EU side of things seems boring.

Outside the UK, the media is (naturally) less absorbed by the daily twists and turns of Brexit and the internal machinations of British politics. Thus the coverage tends to focus more on trends rather than specific events. In addition, non-UK media is more likely to view Brexit as a European question: what it means for the EU as a whole and for the EU27 member states (while still covering events on the ground in the UK). There are simply different priorities in terms of the news agenda.

On a personal level, I would agree that some non-UK sources provide richer analysis of Brexit than what British media generally offers. But I can also understand why, in a highly charged political debate, British media outlets would be nervous about giving greater space to the European perspective on things -- there is a loud and sizable segment of the population that would call that biased.
Ne1L C1,115 posts since 11 Sep 2011
I have seen it described more than once on the news this morning as the "worst case scenario" without any reference to the serious doubts about this, which is disappointing.

Also no definition of what the"worse case" actually is. Surely the position we're in now isn't the "best case".


The so-called "clean brexit", otherwise known as the no-deal brexit, is always gonna be the worst case scenario. The position were in now is bad, continued uncertainty is never good for an economy, but the no-deal brexit is going to tank everything for a long time, and we've seen from Japan just how long it can take for an economy to actually recover from a serious tanking.

When it comes to this whole situation, some of the best coverage I've seen of this has come from non-UK news sources. RTE in Ireland and ABC in Australia in particular have come out with some of the better pieces overall, and previously, RTE's News2Day had a wonderful explainer of Brexit which explained it much better than 3 years of coverage on BBC News ever has.


Precisely. The UK Media's coverage of politics is more focused on personalities and not the principles.
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Newsroom1,720 posts since 2 Mar 2005 Recently warned
Why oh why does the ruling from the Supreme Court this morning have to happen during Victoria Derbyshire. Crying or Very sad
Formerly News Room
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GMc gave kudos
Newsroom1,720 posts since 2 Mar 2005 Recently warned
VD branding dropped from News Channel, now a BBC News Special according to iPlayer.
Last edited by Newsroom on 24 September 2019 10:47am
Formerly News Room
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