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VMPhil9,777 posts since 31 Mar 2005
Granada North West Today
Countdown Masters was notable for being the point where Carol started putting up the letters rather than just doing the numbers round.

Am I missing something? What happened before that?


From the Countdown Wiki:
Quote:
In early episodes she was only called upon to provide the occasional numbers solution, alternating with Dr. Linda Barrett. When Linda left at the end of Series 2, Carol took on the role of solving unsolved numbers games full-time. After the departure of Lucy Summers in 1989, she began putting up the letters and numbers as well.

http://wiki.apterous.org/Carol_Vorderman
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Steve Williams2,781 posts since 1 Aug 2008
There was another TV show I can't remember what it was that pushed out exclusive episodes or material on home video, only for it to air on TV a few months later. There was quite an uproar about it, ironically enough.


That was Coronation Street: The Cruise in 1995, it was sold as an exclusive-to-video episode and ITV then showed it on telly three months later, as you say to much uproar and people appearing on Right to Reply and in the papers asking for their money back. They carried on with these straight-to-video things - for Corrie, Emmerdale and Heartbeat - but after that they would never say they were exclusive to video, but that they wouldn't be shown on TV for X months. And ITV did show most of them in the end, even though they presumably seemed a bit out of date by the time they did.

The Gavin and Stacey thing was an absolute storm in a teacup, the series was delayed by a few weeks so it would finish at Christmas which meant the DVD - which presumably they wanted out for the Christmas market - came out before the series finished, and there was a hoo-haa over the money-grabbing Beeb demanding money to see it first. Which affected about 0.0001% of the audience.

A decade earlier, the second series of Harry Enfield and Chums was rescheduled quite late in the day from autumn 1996 to January 1997, but the VHS release came out for Christmas 1996, so it was renamed "Harry Enfield and Chums 1997" and sold as a preview of the new series. Nobody seemed that bothered about that one, mind.
whoiam989873 posts since 22 Dec 2007
BBC World News
Since some people in the age of the likes of Netflix and Amazon Prime Video may not get it...

Let's suppose the (upcoming) UK version of premium streaming service BritBox releases a special episode of certain ITV drama, which is billed as a "BritBox Exclusive", and then ITV airs it on one of its free-to-air channels just few weeks later. How will people (especially the premium subscribers of BritBox) react then?
Neil Jones5,421 posts since 23 Dec 2001
Central (West) Midlands Today
Could it be argued its carelessness, accident or deliberate marketing ploy when these things happen?

Family Guy did the "Stewie Griffin: The Untold Story" as a direct to DVD release which Fox decided to eventually air anyway the following year so its probably safe to say that was a deliberate decision to do that. However IIRC it never said on the packaging that it was never going to be seen on TV.

The Mr Bean video just said that episode had never been seen on TV, didn't say it was never going to be on TV, surprised it lasted 11 years actually. The later DVD release just paints it as a normal episode. However a lot of water had gone under the bridge between 1995 and 2006 and its entirely plausible I suppose somebody wasn't aware that had been a home exclusive when ITV decided they wanted to rerun Bean.

And of course sometimes the issue is out of their hands anyway like the Gavin & Stacey thing. Not the distributor's fault the show was pushed back though I suppose the logistics meant it was easier just to let it go as planned rather than miss out on the Christmas sales.
Xilla213 posts since 29 Nov 2003
With the Family Guy DVD, IIRC there was some wraparound material in it that wasn't part of the TV airing, and some risque jokes that got axed so I guess they could have gotten away with saying you'd never see it on TV Wink
IndigoTucker507 posts since 4 Jan 2003


That was Coronation Street: The Cruise in 1995, it was sold as an exclusive-to-video episode and ITV then showed it on telly three months later, as you say to much uproar and people appearing on Right to Reply and in the papers asking for their money back. They carried on with these straight-to-video things - for Corrie, Emmerdale and Heartbeat - but after that they would never say they were exclusive to video, but that they wouldn't be shown on TV for X months. And ITV did show most of them in the end, even though they presumably seemed a bit out of date by the time they did.


Indeed it was - those who complained got a free copy of Daran Little's 'The Coronation Street Story' and a replacement VHS sleeve, minus the exclusive to video label.
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Jonwo (previously Jonwo87) 635 posts since 20 Sep 2007
Since some people in the age of the likes of Netflix and Amazon Prime Video may not get it...

Let's suppose the (upcoming) UK version of premium streaming service BritBox releases a special episode of certain ITV drama, which is billed as a "BritBox Exclusive", and then ITV airs it on one of its free-to-air channels just few weeks later. How will people (especially the premium subscribers of BritBox) react then?


Good Omens is going to air on BBC Two later this year after airing on Amazon Prime but I would guess no one will bat an eyelid.

I imagine ITV wouldn't air Britbox originals a few weeks after transmission, a few months maybe but not weeks.
Neil Jones5,421 posts since 23 Dec 2001
Central (West) Midlands Today
Good Omens is a co-production between BBC Studios and Amazon Studios. The latter have done a few things with Sky and ITV, Vanity Fair and The Widow were co-productions between ITV Studios and Amazon Studios.

I don't know how the finances work on these co-productions, presumably ITV and Amazon split the production costs between them and then ITV keeps the ad revenue when it airs it, and Amazon Studios handles the syndications and makes its money back that way? Its probably safe to say nobody loses out.

Supposedly working with Amazon increases ITV's indie quota for its programmes.
RDJ2,717 posts since 25 Oct 2003
Central (South) Midlands Today
Remember ITV's Day of Promise? It's a frequent topic that crops up on the forum of a telethon like day that wasn't actually a telethon on a May Bank Holiday in the year 2000.

You can head up more of this here: https://tvforum.uk/tvhome/itvs-day-promise-memories-39712/

A sizeable 20 minute chunk of the end of coverage has been recently posted on YouTube.

Central News South
January 9th 1989 - December 3rd 2006
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