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JKDerry1,805 posts since 15 Oct 2016
UTV Newsline

No, that does not count. It means the Channel Islands as a whole entity was the last place to receive UHF television, whereas Northern Ireland first got UHF television in 1967 when BBC Two launched, followed in 1970 by BBC One and Ulster Television. My home town of Londonderry got UHF in December 1975.


BBC Two launched in 625 B&W on UHF in 1964, not 1967. 1967 was the year that BBC Two started regularly broadcasting PAL colour content.

Or do you mean that 1967 was the year that BBC Two transmissions started in Northern Ireland (3 years after the channel launched)?

BBC Two in Northern Ireland launched in 1967. Remember BBC Two started in London and the South East, and then gradually moved out to other regions by the end of the 1960s into the 1970s.
noggin14,440 posts since 26 Jun 2001
Whoops sorry my bad - my mistake - I meant 1966 was when BBC Two Northern Ireland launched on Saturday 11th June 1966. I apologise for my previous error stating 1967.


To be very pedantic BBC 2 (and it was 2 and not TWO back then) was the national UK version, national/regional versions of BBC 2 didn't appear until the 80s ? Cool


Presumably running national operations in dual standards (405 for BBC One, 625 for BBC Two) was a complication best avoided? (Plus BBC Two was still very new - and I doubt there was any great push to regionalise it)
Markymark6,959 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
Whoops sorry my bad - my mistake - I meant 1966 was when BBC Two Northern Ireland launched on Saturday 11th June 1966. I apologise for my previous error stating 1967.


To be very pedantic BBC 2 (and it was 2 and not TWO back then) was the national UK version, national/regional versions of BBC 2 didn't appear until the 80s ? Cool


Presumably running national operations in dual standards (405 for BBC One, 625 for BBC Two) was a complication best avoided? (Plus BBC Two was still very new - and I doubt there was any great push to regionalise it)


I think there was also a distribution problem, in North Wales Moel-y-Parc and Llandonna sourced their BBC 2 feeds from Winter Hill for some years into the 70s, and therefore had no feed available from Cardiff. As it was the BBC 1/625 feed from Cardiff was tortious enough, so it was not duplicated for BBC 2 until there was an imperative for BBC 2 Wales to be created
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noggin14,440 posts since 26 Jun 2001

To be very pedantic BBC 2 (and it was 2 and not TWO back then) was the national UK version, national/regional versions of BBC 2 didn't appear until the 80s ? Cool


Presumably running national operations in dual standards (405 for BBC One, 625 for BBC Two) was a complication best avoided? (Plus BBC Two was still very new - and I doubt there was any great push to regionalise it)


I think there was also a distribution problem, in North Wales Moel-y-Parc and Llandonna sourced their BBC 2 feeds from Winter Hill for some years into the 70s, and therefore had no feed available from Cardiff. As it was the BBC 1/625 feed from Cardiff was tortious enough, so it was not duplicated for BBC 2 until there was an imperative for BBC 2 Wales to be created


Yes - that makes sense.
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