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JKDerry1,805 posts since 15 Oct 2016
UTV Newsline
Didn't there do live week from down under and disneyland awell?

Yes, they left Camden Lock for the sunnier and peaceful Australia, to celebrate the Bicentennial in 1988. They also extended the half hour live programme to an hour special on Christmas Eve 1987, which is also online.
Steve Williams2,781 posts since 1 Aug 2008
I have a feeling with time, the management grew in confidence, and increased the amount of live programming they could do in their management run service, with less reliance on Happy Days, Batman etc - Thames had to stick mostly with repeats and imports, I am not sure if Thames News ran a full programme during the 1984 strike.


No, because the NUJ refused to cross the picket lines. They did news bulletins - which included national news, given they couldn't show anything from ITN - and the Evening Standard accused them of reading it straight out of the paper.

According to Morning Glory part of the management run GMB was a half hour interview with Anne Diamond.


A half hour interview conducted by Anne Diamond, is what it says.
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AidanLunn8 posts since 17 Oct 2017
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
BBC One, BBC Two and Channel Television in colour on the UHF 625 line service launched from Fremont Point on Saturday 24th July 1976 - the islands where the last part of the UK to receive BBC Two and colour television.


No they weren't. It was the western part of Northern Ireland, when the last main UHF transmitter - Brougher Mountain - opened in December 1978
JKDerry1,805 posts since 15 Oct 2016
UTV Newsline
BBC One, BBC Two and Channel Television in colour on the UHF 625 line service launched from Fremont Point on Saturday 24th July 1976 - the islands where the last part of the UK to receive BBC Two and colour television.


No they weren't. It was the western part of Northern Ireland, when the last main UHF transmitter - Brougher Mountain - opened in December 1978

No, that does not count. It means the Channel Islands as a whole entity was the last place to receive UHF television, whereas Northern Ireland first got UHF television in 1967 when BBC Two launched, followed in 1970 by BBC One and Ulster Television. My home town of Londonderry got UHF in December 1975.
Inspector Sands13,762 posts since 25 Aug 2004
Mainly in the countryside, right?


I think the quoted figure was something like 99.9% of the population. But that is different to 99.9% of the country. There are lots of remote parts where either inhabitable or so few people live that it's not worth providing TV reception to.

The official coverage maps have large areas without any coverage, mainly parts of the Highlands and the hilly middle bit of Wales etc

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Last edited by Inspector Sands on 7 September 2019 8:49am - 3 times in total
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Markymark6,959 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
BBC One, BBC Two and Channel Television in colour on the UHF 625 line service launched from Fremont Point on Saturday 24th July 1976 - the islands where the last part of the UK to receive BBC Two and colour television.


No they weren't. It was the western part of Northern Ireland, when the last main UHF transmitter - Brougher Mountain - opened in December 1978

No, that does not count. It means the Channel Islands as a whole entity was the last place to receive UHF television, whereas Northern Ireland first got UHF television in 1967 when BBC Two launched, followed in 1970 by BBC One and Ulster Television. My home town of Londonderry got UHF in December 1975.


Depends what you mean by entity. The Shetland Is and the Hebrides didn't get UHF until 1976 either, and for them it was their first sighting of ITV (as well as BBC2 of course )
All three extensions required innovative technical solutions to deliver the programme feeds, 76 was a landmark year for transmission engineering
noggin14,440 posts since 26 Jun 2001

No, that does not count. It means the Channel Islands as a whole entity was the last place to receive UHF television, whereas Northern Ireland first got UHF television in 1967 when BBC Two launched, followed in 1970 by BBC One and Ulster Television. My home town of Londonderry got UHF in December 1975.


BBC Two launched in 625 B&W on UHF in 1964, not 1967. 1967 was the year that BBC Two started regularly broadcasting PAL colour content.

Or do you mean that 1967 was the year that BBC Two transmissions started in Northern Ireland (3 years after the channel launched)?